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10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders

10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders
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Everyone likes to hear the stories of great leaders, especially heroic leaders. Think of great people like Martin Luther King, Mandela, and Mother Teresa. These heroic leaders were common individuals who jumped into the crisis situations regardless of whether or not they were responsible for resolving the issue. We praise these characters as role models and celebrate their successes.

Here are some common qualities of heroic leaders.

1. Courage

Heroic leaders have the determination to achieve the goal, regardless of the challenging obstacles. They display confidence under stress and are courageous enough to take risks when others are looking to hide themselves.

In, 1955, Rosa Lee Parks in Tuskegee, Alabama refused to hand over her seat to a white passenger on an isolated Montgomery, Alabama bus. She was detained and penalized, but her courageous action directed a positive boycott of the Montgomery buses by African American passengers.

    2. Passion

    It might be possible to instill leaders’ qualities, but truly heroic leaders are already passionate about their work. Their passion and level of assurance inspire the team members and motivate them to perform better.

    Mohandas Gandhi was a well-known political and ideological leader of India during the Indian independence movement. Gandhi headed the powerful Salt Tax protest and was detained numerous times for his protests against British rule.

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      3. Integrity

      Leadership is the integration of external actions and internal ethics. Heroic leaders are trusted by their followers because they never change from inner values, even when it might be difficult.

      Nelson Mandela had the trust and daring to fight against the unfair structure of apartheid. Because of his political actions, he was sent to prison for 20 years, but he managed to win the trust of the people and soon he was set free to lead a free South Africa.

        4. Honesty

        Heroic leaders are always honest with everyone around them; they tell the truth and possess little tolerance for telling people what they want to hear. At the end of the communiqué, they expect honesty from others, and they don’t penalize people for doing so.

        Abraham Lincoln’s great laws of truth and honesty led people to recognize him as a judge or moderator in several cases, fights, and quarrels. People trusted implicitly upon his honesty, truthfulness, and fairness.

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          5. Confidence

          Developing self-confidence is ingrained in heroic leaders as a key to success. A leader begins to develop confidence by achieving a small accomplishment. As heroic leaders progress in their lives, they attract fellowship, use influence tactics to develop self-confidence, and shape, train, and motivate a team.

          Steve Jobs’s leadership style was multifaceted. He was strongly focused when committed and confident enough to make risky decisions to enlist legions of employees and customers in the persistent search of his goals.

            6. Patience

            One of the greatest qualities heroism possesses is a great amount of patience, an invaluable virtue, which helped them in spreading their message.

            Martin Luther King, Jr. significantly contributed to American society by eradicating isolation and hugely plummeting racism. During his movement, King’s life was in unceasing danger—his home was blown up and his companions were threatened, hassled, arrested, and detained. His impeccable quality of patience to remove racism makes King one of the most inspirational heroes of all time.

              7. Selflessness

              A great American leader John F.Kennedy once said, “Don’t ask what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.”

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              This is the attitude of truly heroic leaders. They are more concerned about group successes than with hunting their own goals. Such individuals become an inspiration for others, even as they face challenges; they will embrace success and earn respect.

              Again, the great Nelson Mandela was a selfless leader who lived his life for his people, and he has been recognized as one of the greatest leaders in the world. His willingness and enthusiasm to sacrifice for others headed a movement to unite a divided nation and bring together periods of pain and racism. Throughout his life and even after his death, he is renowned as a hero. Mandela dedicated himself to the struggle of the African people.

                8. Caring

                Apart from selflessness, Heroic Leaders care about making the world a better place; they display a sense of concern and kindness for others. They are community service leaders, who take action intentionally to improve the lives of others.

                Mother Teresa’s life-long dedication to the care of the poor, unprivileged and deprived people was one of the utmost examples of service to the humanity. She dedicated herself to humanity, forgotten and unwanted people, not only in India but all over the world.

                  9. Humility

                  Humility is the common quality of heroic leaders: nonexistence of pride or self-assertion in their personality. Heroic leader realizes their own weaknesses, and give credit to all the people behind their success. Humility is the most powerful virtue that is needed within every leader to achieve success.

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                  Jim Levy, an army officer, is recalled as a humble man who served his nation and public in times of war and peace and always kept his sense of service. After the war, when he came back to Montgomery, Levy switched from combat services to community responsibilities and set an example of leadership by playing key roles in various public activities.

                    10. Supportive

                    We conclude from this point that heroic leaders display a supportive leadership behavior. They make it a habit to guide others and are welcoming, approachable, and supportive. Truly heroic leaders lean toward the welfare and requirements of their subordinates.

                    Malala Yousafzai, 15 years old, is the world’s most famous advocate for girls’ right to education; she was shot in the head for protecting every girls’ right to an education in Pakistan’s Swat valley.

                      Featured photo credit: blog.ishafoundation.org via b.isha.ws

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                      Tayyab Babar

                      Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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                      1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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