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10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders

10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders

Everyone likes to hear the stories of great leaders, especially heroic leaders. Think of great people like Martin Luther King, Mandela, and Mother Teresa. These heroic leaders were common individuals who jumped into the crisis situations regardless of whether or not they were responsible for resolving the issue. We praise these characters as role models and celebrate their successes.

Here are some common qualities of heroic leaders.

1. Courage

Heroic leaders have the determination to achieve the goal, regardless of the challenging obstacles. They display confidence under stress and are courageous enough to take risks when others are looking to hide themselves.

In, 1955, Rosa Lee Parks in Tuskegee, Alabama refused to hand over her seat to a white passenger on an isolated Montgomery, Alabama bus. She was detained and penalized, but her courageous action directed a positive boycott of the Montgomery buses by African American passengers.

    2. Passion

    It might be possible to instill leaders’ qualities, but truly heroic leaders are already passionate about their work. Their passion and level of assurance inspire the team members and motivate them to perform better.

    Mohandas Gandhi was a well-known political and ideological leader of India during the Indian independence movement. Gandhi headed the powerful Salt Tax protest and was detained numerous times for his protests against British rule.

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      3. Integrity

      Leadership is the integration of external actions and internal ethics. Heroic leaders are trusted by their followers because they never change from inner values, even when it might be difficult.

      Nelson Mandela had the trust and daring to fight against the unfair structure of apartheid. Because of his political actions, he was sent to prison for 20 years, but he managed to win the trust of the people and soon he was set free to lead a free South Africa.

        4. Honesty

        Heroic leaders are always honest with everyone around them; they tell the truth and possess little tolerance for telling people what they want to hear. At the end of the communiqué, they expect honesty from others, and they don’t penalize people for doing so.

        Abraham Lincoln’s great laws of truth and honesty led people to recognize him as a judge or moderator in several cases, fights, and quarrels. People trusted implicitly upon his honesty, truthfulness, and fairness.

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          5. Confidence

          Developing self-confidence is ingrained in heroic leaders as a key to success. A leader begins to develop confidence by achieving a small accomplishment. As heroic leaders progress in their lives, they attract fellowship, use influence tactics to develop self-confidence, and shape, train, and motivate a team.

          Steve Jobs’s leadership style was multifaceted. He was strongly focused when committed and confident enough to make risky decisions to enlist legions of employees and customers in the persistent search of his goals.

            6. Patience

            One of the greatest qualities heroism possesses is a great amount of patience, an invaluable virtue, which helped them in spreading their message.

            Martin Luther King, Jr. significantly contributed to American society by eradicating isolation and hugely plummeting racism. During his movement, King’s life was in unceasing danger—his home was blown up and his companions were threatened, hassled, arrested, and detained. His impeccable quality of patience to remove racism makes King one of the most inspirational heroes of all time.

              7. Selflessness

              A great American leader John F.Kennedy once said, “Don’t ask what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.”

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              This is the attitude of truly heroic leaders. They are more concerned about group successes than with hunting their own goals. Such individuals become an inspiration for others, even as they face challenges; they will embrace success and earn respect.

              Again, the great Nelson Mandela was a selfless leader who lived his life for his people, and he has been recognized as one of the greatest leaders in the world. His willingness and enthusiasm to sacrifice for others headed a movement to unite a divided nation and bring together periods of pain and racism. Throughout his life and even after his death, he is renowned as a hero. Mandela dedicated himself to the struggle of the African people.

                8. Caring

                Apart from selflessness, Heroic Leaders care about making the world a better place; they display a sense of concern and kindness for others. They are community service leaders, who take action intentionally to improve the lives of others.

                Mother Teresa’s life-long dedication to the care of the poor, unprivileged and deprived people was one of the utmost examples of service to the humanity. She dedicated herself to humanity, forgotten and unwanted people, not only in India but all over the world.

                  9. Humility

                  Humility is the common quality of heroic leaders: nonexistence of pride or self-assertion in their personality. Heroic leader realizes their own weaknesses, and give credit to all the people behind their success. Humility is the most powerful virtue that is needed within every leader to achieve success.

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                  Jim Levy, an army officer, is recalled as a humble man who served his nation and public in times of war and peace and always kept his sense of service. After the war, when he came back to Montgomery, Levy switched from combat services to community responsibilities and set an example of leadership by playing key roles in various public activities.

                    10. Supportive

                    We conclude from this point that heroic leaders display a supportive leadership behavior. They make it a habit to guide others and are welcoming, approachable, and supportive. Truly heroic leaders lean toward the welfare and requirements of their subordinates.

                    Malala Yousafzai, 15 years old, is the world’s most famous advocate for girls’ right to education; she was shot in the head for protecting every girls’ right to an education in Pakistan’s Swat valley.

                      Featured photo credit: blog.ishafoundation.org via b.isha.ws

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                      Tayyab Babar

                      Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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                      Last Updated on October 16, 2019

                      Invaluable Lessons You Can Learn From Your Mistakes

                      Invaluable Lessons You Can Learn From Your Mistakes

                      Do you like making mistakes?

                      I certainly don’t.

                      Making mistakes is inevitable. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could be at ease with them?

                      Perhaps there is a way to think of them differently and see their benefits.

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                      Why Mistakes Feel Dangerous

                      Mistakes often feel dangerous. Throughout human history, our errors have often been treated as dangerous for a variety of reasons:

                      • Our vulnerability. We have limited and fragile support systems. When those systems fail, people often lose their lives.
                      • Real dangers. Nature can be dangerous, and making mistakes can put us at the mercy of nature and its animal residents seeking a meal.
                      • Ignorance. Many cultures scapegoats someone whenever there is a failure of some kind. Scapegoating can be serious and deadly.
                      • Order. Many societies punish those who do not conform to the prevailing orthodoxy and treat difference and non-conformity as a mistake. Even our brains flash an error message whenever we go against prevailing social norms.

                      We have a history of handling mistakes and failure in an unpleasant way. Since each of us carries our human history with us, it can be a challenge to overcome the fear of making mistakes.

                      If we can embrace the reality of mistakes, we can free ourselves to be more creative in our lives and dig up some interesting insights.

                      Why We Can’t Avoid Making Mistakes

                      Many people operate under the notion that making mistakes is an aberration, a mistake if you will. You can call it perfectionism but it is a more substantial problem. It is really a demand for order and continuity.

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                      When we think we can eliminate mistakes, we are often working from a perspective that sees the world as a fixed place. The world, however, is not so obliging. Like it or not, the world, and everything in it, is constantly changing.

                      Change is more constant and pervasive than we can see with our own eyes which is why we often miss it. Our bodies are constantly changing. The natural conditions of the earth change constantly as well. Everything, including economic and cultural systems have life cycles. Everything is in a constant state of flux.

                      We cannot see all of the changes going on around us since rates of change vary. Unfortunately, when we try to create a feeling of certainty and solidity in our lives or operate from the illusion of stability and order, we are fighting reality and our natural evolution which is built on adapting to change.

                      It is better to continually bend into this reality rather than fight every change we experience. Fighting it can cause us to make more mistakes. Finding the benefits in change can be useful and help us minimize unnecessary mistakes.

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                      Lessons Learned from Making Mistakes

                      Life has so many uncertainties and variables that mistakes are inevitable. Fortunately, there are many things you can learn from making mistakes.

                      Here is a list of ways to harness the mistakes you make for your benefit.

                      1. Point us to something we did not know.
                      2. Reveal a nuance we missed.
                      3. Deepen our knowledge.
                      4. Tell us something about our skill levels.
                      5. Help us see what matters and what does not.
                      6. Inform us more about our values.
                      7. Teach us more about others.
                      8. Let us recognize changing circumstances.
                      9. Show us when someone else has changed.
                      10. Keep us connected to what works and what doesn’t work.
                      11. Remind us of our humanity.
                      12. Spur us to want to better work which helps us all.
                      13. Promote compassion for ourselves and others.
                      14. Teach us to value forgiveness.
                      15. Help us to pace ourselves better.
                      16. Invite us to better choices.
                      17. Can teach us how to experiment.
                      18. Can reveal a new insight.
                      19. Can suggest new options we had not considered.
                      20. Can serve as a warning.
                      21. Show us hidden fault lines in our lives which can lead us to more productive arrangements.
                      22. Point out structural problems in our lives.
                      23. Prompt us to learn more about ourselves.
                      24. Remind us how we are like others.
                      25. Make us more humble.
                      26. Help us rectify injustices in our lives.
                      27. Show us where to create more balance in our lives.
                      28. Tell us when the time to move on has occurred.
                      29. Reveal where our passion is and where it is not.
                      30. Expose our true feelings.
                      31. Bring out problems in a relationship.
                      32. Can be a red flag for our misjudgments.
                      33. Point us in a more creative direction.
                      34. Show us when we are not listening.
                      35. Wake us up to our authentic selves.
                      36. Can create distance with someone else.
                      37. Slow us down when we need to.
                      38. Can hasten change.
                      39. Reveal our blind spots.
                      40. Are the invisible made visible.

                      Reframe Reality to Handle Mistakes More Easily

                      The secret to handling mistakes is to:

                      • Expect them as part of the process of growth and development.
                      • Have an experimental mindset.
                      • Think in evolutional rather than fixed terms.

                      When we accept change as the natural structure of the world, our vulnerability and humanness lets us work with the ebb and flow of life.

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                      When we recognize the inevitability of mistakes as part of the ongoing experiment which life is, then we can relax more. In doing so we may make fewer of them.

                      It also helps to keep in mind that trial and error is an organic natural way of living. It is how we have evolved over time. It is better to be with our natural evolution than to fight it and make life harder.

                      When we adopt an evolutional mindset and see ourselves as part of the ongoing human experiment, we can appreciate that all that has been built up over time which includes the many mistakes our ancestors have made over thousands of years. Each one of us today is a part of that human tradition of learning and experimenting,

                      Mistakes are part of the trial and error, experimental nature of life. The more you adopt the experimental, evolutional frame, the easier it becomes to handle mistakes.

                      Handling mistakes well can help you relax and enjoy all aspects of life more.

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                      Featured photo credit: Sarah Kilian via unsplash.com

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