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10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders

10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders

Everyone likes to hear the stories of great leaders, especially heroic leaders. Think of great people like Martin Luther King, Mandela, and Mother Teresa. These heroic leaders were common individuals who jumped into the crisis situations regardless of whether or not they were responsible for resolving the issue. We praise these characters as role models and celebrate their successes.

Here are some common qualities of heroic leaders.

1. Courage

Heroic leaders have the determination to achieve the goal, regardless of the challenging obstacles. They display confidence under stress and are courageous enough to take risks when others are looking to hide themselves.

In, 1955, Rosa Lee Parks in Tuskegee, Alabama refused to hand over her seat to a white passenger on an isolated Montgomery, Alabama bus. She was detained and penalized, but her courageous action directed a positive boycott of the Montgomery buses by African American passengers.

    2. Passion

    It might be possible to instill leaders’ qualities, but truly heroic leaders are already passionate about their work. Their passion and level of assurance inspire the team members and motivate them to perform better.

    Mohandas Gandhi was a well-known political and ideological leader of India during the Indian independence movement. Gandhi headed the powerful Salt Tax protest and was detained numerous times for his protests against British rule.

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      3. Integrity

      Leadership is the integration of external actions and internal ethics. Heroic leaders are trusted by their followers because they never change from inner values, even when it might be difficult.

      Nelson Mandela had the trust and daring to fight against the unfair structure of apartheid. Because of his political actions, he was sent to prison for 20 years, but he managed to win the trust of the people and soon he was set free to lead a free South Africa.

        4. Honesty

        Heroic leaders are always honest with everyone around them; they tell the truth and possess little tolerance for telling people what they want to hear. At the end of the communiqué, they expect honesty from others, and they don’t penalize people for doing so.

        Abraham Lincoln’s great laws of truth and honesty led people to recognize him as a judge or moderator in several cases, fights, and quarrels. People trusted implicitly upon his honesty, truthfulness, and fairness.

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          5. Confidence

          Developing self-confidence is ingrained in heroic leaders as a key to success. A leader begins to develop confidence by achieving a small accomplishment. As heroic leaders progress in their lives, they attract fellowship, use influence tactics to develop self-confidence, and shape, train, and motivate a team.

          Steve Jobs’s leadership style was multifaceted. He was strongly focused when committed and confident enough to make risky decisions to enlist legions of employees and customers in the persistent search of his goals.

            6. Patience

            One of the greatest qualities heroism possesses is a great amount of patience, an invaluable virtue, which helped them in spreading their message.

            Martin Luther King, Jr. significantly contributed to American society by eradicating isolation and hugely plummeting racism. During his movement, King’s life was in unceasing danger—his home was blown up and his companions were threatened, hassled, arrested, and detained. His impeccable quality of patience to remove racism makes King one of the most inspirational heroes of all time.

              7. Selflessness

              A great American leader John F.Kennedy once said, “Don’t ask what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.”

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              This is the attitude of truly heroic leaders. They are more concerned about group successes than with hunting their own goals. Such individuals become an inspiration for others, even as they face challenges; they will embrace success and earn respect.

              Again, the great Nelson Mandela was a selfless leader who lived his life for his people, and he has been recognized as one of the greatest leaders in the world. His willingness and enthusiasm to sacrifice for others headed a movement to unite a divided nation and bring together periods of pain and racism. Throughout his life and even after his death, he is renowned as a hero. Mandela dedicated himself to the struggle of the African people.

                8. Caring

                Apart from selflessness, Heroic Leaders care about making the world a better place; they display a sense of concern and kindness for others. They are community service leaders, who take action intentionally to improve the lives of others.

                Mother Teresa’s life-long dedication to the care of the poor, unprivileged and deprived people was one of the utmost examples of service to the humanity. She dedicated herself to humanity, forgotten and unwanted people, not only in India but all over the world.

                  9. Humility

                  Humility is the common quality of heroic leaders: nonexistence of pride or self-assertion in their personality. Heroic leader realizes their own weaknesses, and give credit to all the people behind their success. Humility is the most powerful virtue that is needed within every leader to achieve success.

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                  Jim Levy, an army officer, is recalled as a humble man who served his nation and public in times of war and peace and always kept his sense of service. After the war, when he came back to Montgomery, Levy switched from combat services to community responsibilities and set an example of leadership by playing key roles in various public activities.

                    10. Supportive

                    We conclude from this point that heroic leaders display a supportive leadership behavior. They make it a habit to guide others and are welcoming, approachable, and supportive. Truly heroic leaders lean toward the welfare and requirements of their subordinates.

                    Malala Yousafzai, 15 years old, is the world’s most famous advocate for girls’ right to education; she was shot in the head for protecting every girls’ right to an education in Pakistan’s Swat valley.

                      Featured photo credit: blog.ishafoundation.org via b.isha.ws

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                      Tayyab Babar

                      Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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                      1 2 Transformational Ways to Spark Your Creative Energy 2 How To Become Indistractable: 4 Powerful Tactics 3 The Pros and Cons of Being Self-Critical (And How to Strike a Balance) 4 How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day 5 How to Start Delegating Tasks Effectively (Step-by-Step Guide)

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                      Last Updated on October 22, 2020

                      2 Transformational Ways to Spark Your Creative Energy

                      2 Transformational Ways to Spark Your Creative Energy

                      Good things come in twos: Peanut butter and jelly, Day and night, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. The same is true for what sparks our creative energy: our thoughts and actions.

                      Creativity is an inside job as much as it is about a conducive schedule, physical environment, and supportive behaviors. By establishing the right internal and external landscape, creativity can blossom from the abstract to the concrete and we can have fun along the way.

                      Sparking creativity is all about setting up the right conditions so a spark is ignited and sustained. The sparks don’t fizzle out. They are allowed to grow and ripen.

                      Think of a garden. Intention alone will not produce the delicious red tomato nor will the readiest seed. That seed needs attention at its nascent stage and as it grows a stalk and produces fruit. If we want to enjoy more than one fruit, we keep at it, cultivating the plant and reaping multiple harvests.

                      Creativity lives in each of us like seeds in the earth or encapsulated in a nut. Seeds of ideas, concepts, designs, stories, images, and even ways of communicating that surprise and delight await activation.

                      By sparking our creative energy, we activate these unique seeds. Like snowflakes, they are of a moment and always without a match. The smallest sparks encourage even the smallest, most dormant seeds to sprout.

                      The good news is that our creative energy wishes to be sparked—to be invited to play. It wants to be our regular playmate.

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                      1. Be Childlike in Your Thoughts, Attitudes, and Approach

                      Being childlike in our thoughts, attitudes, and approach is an easy way to internally have our thoughts be gracious prolific gardeners to our creative energy. If we want it to come out and play and hang around as our regular companion, then let’s return to our 5-year-old selves.

                      Our childhood selves are naturally curious. We still have that curiosity! All we have to do is remind ourselves to get curious. We can do that by simply observing and being with what is in front of us instead of making up a story about what won’t work or why something can’t be done. So, it’s about cultivating curiosity instead of jumping into judgment.

                      Move Your Inner Judge to the Sidelines

                      When we get curious, creativity percolates and, ultimately, takes its place in the world. To give a hand in choosing curiosity over judgment, we can move the judge that also lives inside us to the sidelines. The judge squashes our creative urges, even when they are as small as sharing a point of view. It’s that pesky voice that causes us to doubt ourselves or worry about what others will think.

                      The judge is also risk-averse. The judge likes things to stay the same. Change makes the judge nervous.

                      Creativity is all about risk and changing things up. It needs risk, even failure, to be its naturally innovative, dynamic, impactful self. The judge likes to convince us failure is something to be avoided at all costs.

                      To move the judge to the sidelines and let curiosity reign, we can pay attention to who we are in conversation with and who is calling the shots.

                      Is it the voice of fear, doubt, or anxiety (the inner-critic—the judge’s boss)? Or is it the voice of wisdom, courage, strength, and non-attachment, and of course curiosity (the inner-leader)?

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                      We can easily tell the difference by how each makes us feel. The inner-critic depletes and slows us down, putting roadblocks in the way. The inner-leader energizes and a natural rhythm develops.

                      It’s all about who we spend time with. If we wish to exercise, we will seek out our friends who go to the gym or hike. If we want to lose some weight, we will opt to eat dinner with someone who prefers a healthy spot over fast food.

                      After getting curious, we can honor what our curiosity prompts us to do. The spark can do its job and a fire starts to glow when commitment enters. Our childhood selves were fully committed to being creative. That level of commitment is still something we are very capable of exercising!!

                      Again, we need to let go of the judge. We can ask ourselves, what do we want to commit to—negativity that depletes our creative energy, depth, and output, or the understanding that our thoughts and attitudes matter and that right thoughts and attitudes are the sparks that really let our creativity come alive?

                      Learn to Recall Your Childhood Self

                      To get in touch with that unabashedly committed childhood self, recall your childhood self. If you have a picture, pull one out. Keep it around so you can remember to activate that innate creative nature that was prominent then and wants to be prominent now and always.

                      Soak in the essence of that being. Commit to their commitment to brave and dogged trial and error because it is yours as well. You are that person.

                      Remember how tenacious you were when you wanted to build that sandcastle. You kept at it as the waves came in. You built with fury or reconfigured the walls. Also, remember that there was a willingness to fail since you were as invested in the process as well as the outcome—but less with the outcome. You were willing to experiment and start again. There was vitality—the main lifeline of your creative energy—instead of a rigid attachment.

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                      When you notice you are in conversation with your inner-critic or being held back by it, simply acknowledge, name it, and then switch to your inner-leader by taking a few good deep belly breaths, rubbing two fingertips together, or listening to ambient sounds in the background.

                      Physical movements shift our negative thoughts over to the positive domain of the inner-leader. As our judge continues to sit on the sidelines, our ability to quiet the inner-critic becomes stronger. We taste freedom. A simple taste emboldens us to say no again to the judge and yes to what makes our hearts and spirits sing—our creativity.

                      We begin to spark creativity to the point it no longer needs to be invited to play. It becomes our regular playmate—the younger sibling or the kid next door ready to have some fun, maybe even make some mischief by shaking things up.

                      When we align with our inner-leader and think and act from its promptings, creativity flows up and out with ease, as it needs to!

                      Letting those initial sparks generate a creativity fire that keeps burning is something we can all do! That’s the inside job.

                      2. Listen to Your Inner Leaders of Creative Energy

                      If we listen, our inner-leaders will let us know just what we need to set-up and do in our physical world to maximize that gorgeous, hungry creativity we now have flowing freely in us.

                      The seed has been unlocked! So, now what?

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                      To enable our creative energy to take its form and place outside of us, there needs to be spaciousness! Spaciousness in our physical worlds impacts our internal one. It lets the voice of the inner-leader be heard. It lets creativity have room to be sparked and acted upon.

                      With a little discipline, we can easily create spaciousness in our daily lives—spaciousness that will spark our creativity and let it take shape.

                      So, no matter who you are and what conditions help your creativity thrive, check-out these easy-to-implement basic suggestions:

                      • Reduce or eliminate multi-tasking.
                      • Say yes to what matters and what aligns with your big values and goals.
                      • Say no to all else.
                      • Say no again.
                      • Schedule time in your calendar as you do with other things in your life to just be, to ponder, to let ideas percolate, and to create.
                      • Spend time doing the things that bring out your creative energy. It could be walking, singing, or simply looking out the window.
                      • Meditate.
                      • Breathe—long breaths in and long breaths out through the nose.
                      • Invite your body and heart into your experiences so your mind is a part of you and not all of you.
                      • Try a new thing to spark your creativity. If you spend time running, try a different route. If running feels stale, cruise around a museum, or go for a bike ride.
                      • Play a game. Indoors out or outside. Think of what makes you happy that you haven’t done in a while. Is it a physical game like badminton or cards? Maybe it’s storytelling? Play is creative, and it sparks the creative energy, too.
                      • Spend time in the places that bring out your creativity. What spot in your home could be your spot for entering into that mode? Do you need to get out? Maybe a park bench is the right spot, with a book of poetry, or even nothing at all.
                      • Spend time in nature. Nature brings us to a place of calm and awe and through that our creativity is easily sparked.

                      Final Thoughts

                      These are all habits—habits of mind and habits of doing. Experiment with what works for you. Have fun. If you give even 50% to altering your thoughts and actions, then you will begin to spark your creativity. It takes a lot of curiosity and commitment, but it can definitely be done.

                      Our innate creative energy is a deep source of all that we seek—joy, connection, renewal. It deserves and looks forward to the changes you will make that will let sparks fly and ignite!

                      More Tips to Spark Your Creative Energy

                      Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

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