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10 Reasons Why People Who Like Drawing Are More Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons Why People Who Like Drawing Are More Likely To Be Successful

Drawing dates back to pre-historic era when it was the only form of communication between humans. Hence, it is through drawings that we study our history. These drawings have been found everywhere. From vases to walls of tombs, to walls of houses, pots, anything! And now, in the present time, this medium of drawing is more polished, more advanced and more intelligent.

We are presenting 10 beneficial factors that indicate why people who like drawing are more likely to be successful.

1. They have active brain cells

Now when I say drawing is intelligent, I literally mean intelligent. It is not only an art that certain talented people, named artists, do, but studies have found the impact drawing has in one’s brain. The right hemisphere of our brain is responsible for creativity and imagination. While the left hemisphere is involved in logical task. Now, as you draw, 80% of your right hemisphere gets activated. Therefore, when we are drawing, not only do both our hemispheres work simultaneously but develop its capacity as well.

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2. They have sharp memory.

Did you know that drawing and art are used in therapies as well? Dr. Arnold Bresky, a physician, has created a program, “Brain Tune Up“, where he uses art as a therapy for Alzheimer and dementia patients. And the result has been amazingly successful with 70% improvement in his patients’ memories. He believes that drawing and painting helps growing new brain cells. This is not only applicable to patients but in a normal person, drawing actually adds synapses to the brain’s transmitters. This means that the memories and experiences reserved in your brain are stronger, more striking, and more accessible.

memory
    Photo Source: Margin Doodle by Peach Jelly

    3. They are more observant and can concentrate better.

    Artists need all the concentration in the world while they are drawing. And this helps into building concentration power, making them focus totally on one thing only.

    As Leonardo da Vinci once said,

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    “Painting embraces all the ten functions of the eyes, that is to say, darkness, light, body and color, shape and location, distance and closeness, motion and rest.”

    Through such concentration, you can “see” details around you, your surroundings, your environment.

    4. They can communicate finer.

    Through drawing you can express various emotions, train of thoughts, and collective feelings. Drawing expands the option of an assorted communication field. Through drawing you can express what you feel, what you want, your perception, etc. Shy people, or people with verbal disabilities find drawing a better communication to enunciate with others.

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    5. They can release depression through drawing.

    Drawing is an art with a healing power. As I have mentioned before drawing has been used as a therapy to patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s, it can also be used as a therapy for depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. Because drawing produces positive brain chemistry like Serotonin, Endorphins, Dopamine, and Norepinephrine.

    6. They have strong motor skills.

    Parents introduce children to drawing at a very tender age, even before they can hold pencils properly. That is why researchers believe that children develop stronger motor skills because manipulating and gripping of the different devices like pencils, charcoals or brushes with the hands go impeccably with this median. The working capacity improves, therefore, for the adults, their motor skills increases a lot!

    7. They have improved self-esteem.

    How does drawing boost your confidence? Say, your child drew a piece of art, however gibberish it is, you will still put it up on your fridge, or attach it to the wall in your child’s room. This lifts up the self-esteem. It encourages to draw more, and thus, gradually improve. The same applies to adults as well. If you draw something and you like it, you will definitely hang the art on the wall. This gives out satisfaction that stimulates you to move forward.

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    8. They can easily reduce their stress through drawing.

    You are thoroughly stressed out at the office. And the next thing you know is you are drawing something on a piece of paper. Does this help? Of course it does! I know a mum of two toddlers who paints whenever her children are sleeping, even if it is only for a short time. Painting, sculpting, drawing, these are relaxing and fruitful distractions from your everyday hectic chores.

    9. They can express themselves in a unique manner.

    An important benefit of drawing is to express oneself in a unique manner. Sketching out your thoughts and ideas, or oozing out your imagination on paper can make you explore yourself into a deeper trance. When you are painting a portrait, the colors you choose express your feelings for that person. Or even when you are composing a landscape, the exaggeration of colors indicate your emotions, your take on the world. It is something truly beautiful!

    10. They can have FUN!

    This goes without saying. Drawing is fun regardless of you being an adult or a child. Especially when you are in company. Painting builds a bridge towards a stronger friendship. It is a way of unwinding yourself in the company of others. Imagine you and your gang of friends, spending a lazy weekend afternoon at a park, painting and sharing jokes, laughing away to your heart’s content! Absolutely picture perfect!

    You don’t have to be Van Gogh or Pablo Picasso. All you need is a paper, a pencil, colors and some brushes. Go and draw something, unwrap yourself, stimulate your brain cells and boost your energy! Have fun!

    Featured photo credit: monika strataki via flickr.com

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    Last Updated on July 17, 2019

    The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

    The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

    What happens in our heads when we set goals?

    Apparently a lot more than you’d think.

    Goal setting isn’t quite so simple as deciding on the things you’d like to accomplish and working towards them.

    According to the research of psychologists, neurologists, and other scientists, setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it. That is, by setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are – setting up the conditions that drive us to work towards the goals to fulfill the brain’s self-image.

    Apparently, the brain cannot distinguish between things we want and things we have. Neurologically, then, our brains treat the failure to achieve our goal the same way as it treats the loss of a valued possession. And up until the moment, the goal is achieved, we have failed to achieve it, setting up a constant tension that the brain seeks to resolve.

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    Ideally, this tension is resolved by driving us towards accomplishment. In many cases, though, the brain simply responds to the loss, causing us to feel fear, anxiety, even anguish, depending on the value of the as-yet-unattained goal.

    Love, Loss, Dopamine, and Our Dreams

    The brains functions are carried out by a stew of chemicals called neurotransmitters. You’ve probably heard of serotonin, which plays a key role in our emotional life – most of the effective anti-depressant medications on the market are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, meaning they regulate serotonin levels in the brain leading to more stable moods.

    Somewhat less well-known is another neurotransmitter, dopamine. Among other things, dopamine acts as a motivator, creating a sensation of pleasure when the brain is stimulated by achievement. Dopamine is also involved in maintaining attention – some forms of ADHD are linked to irregular responses to dopamine.[1]

    So dopamine plays a key role in keeping us focused on our goals and motivating us to attain them, rewarding our attention and achievement by elevating our mood. That is, we feel good when we work towards our goals.

    Dopamine is related to wanting – to desire. The attainment of the object of our desire releases dopamine into our brains and we feel good. Conversely, the frustration of our desires starves us of dopamine, causing anxiety and fear.

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    One of the greatest desires is romantic love – the long-lasting, “till death do us part” kind. It’s no surprise, then, that romantic love is sustained, at least in part, through the constant flow of dopamine released in the presence – real or imagined – of our true love. Loss of romantic love cuts off that supply of dopamine, which is why it feels like you’re dying – your brain responds by triggering all sorts of anxiety-related responses.

    Herein lies obsession, as we go to ever-increasing lengths in search of that dopamine reward. Stalking specialists warn against any kind of contact with a stalker, positive or negative, because any response at all triggers that reward mechanism. If you let the phone ring 50 times and finally pick up on the 51st ring to tell your stalker off, your stalker gets his or her reward, and learns that all s/he has to do is wait for the phone to ring 51 times.

    Romantic love isn’t the only kind of desire that can create this kind of dopamine addiction, though – as Captain Ahab (from Moby Dick) knew well, any suitably important goal can become an obsession once the mind has established ownership.

    The Neurology of Ownership

    Ownership turns out to be about a lot more than just legal rights. When we own something, we invest a part of ourselves into it – it becomes an extension of ourselves.

    In a famous experiment at Cornell University, researchers gave students school logo coffee mugs, and then offered to trade them chocolate bars for the mugs. Very few were willing to make the trade, no matter how much they professed to like chocolate. Big deal, right? Maybe they just really liked those mugs![2]

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    But when they reversed the experiment, handing out chocolate and then offering to trade mugs for the candy, they found that now, few students were all that interested in the mugs. Apparently the key thing about the mugs or the chocolate wasn’t whether students valued whatever they had in their possession, but simply that they had it in their possession.

    This phenomenon is called the “endowment effect”. In a nutshell, the endowment effect occurs when we take ownership of an object (or idea, or person); in becoming “ours” it becomes integrated with our sense of identity, making us reluctant to part with it (losing it is seen as a loss, which triggers that dopamine shut-off I discussed above).

    Interestingly, researchers have found that the endowment effect doesn’t require actual ownership or even possession to come into play. In fact, it’s enough to have a reasonable expectation of future possession for us to start thinking of something as a part of us – as jilted lovers, gambling losers, and 7-year olds denied a toy at the store have all experienced.

    The Upshot for Goal-Setters

    So what does all this mean for would-be achievers?

    On one hand, it’s a warning against setting unreasonable goals. The bigger the potential for positive growth a goal has, the more anxiety and stress your brain is going to create around it’s non-achievement.

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    It also suggests that the common wisdom to limit your goals to a small number of reasonable, attainable objectives is good advice. The more goals you have, the more ends your brain thinks it “owns” and therefore the more grief and fear the absence of those ends is going to cause you.

    On a more positive note, the fact that the brain rewards our attentiveness by releasing dopamine means that our brain is working with us to direct us to achievement. Paying attention to your goals feels good, encouraging us to spend more time doing it. This may be why outcome visualization — a favorite technique of self-help gurus involving imagining yourself having completed your objectives — has such a poor track record in clinical studies. It effectively tricks our brain into rewarding us for achieving our goals even though we haven’t done it yet!

    But ultimately, our brain wants us to achieve our goals, so that it’s a sense of who we are that can be fulfilled. And that’s pretty good news!

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    Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

    Reference

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