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10 Books To Inspire You To Get Rich

10 Books To Inspire You To Get Rich
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Books are a key to success. It’d be hard to attain any kind of success without reading! Yet we are constantly flooded with so many books to read. It is important to be picky on the subject you chose to read, and if it is on being inspired to become rich with ease, here are some books I have taken my time to write about. I believe they will be really helpful in making your desire come true.

1. The Magic of Thinking Big by David Shwartz

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    From the day of its release this book became an instant success. Written by Dr. David Shwartz, renowned expert on motivation and earning more money, it follows the adage according to Donald Trump, “if you are going to be big, you might as well think big.” This book offers you a methodical approach on how you can get the most out of your job, your marriage and family. It also helps you see the bigger picture on how you can make those big dreams become attainable.

    2. Awaken the Giant Within by Anthony Robbins

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      This book is a noted production by Anthony Robbins for his spiritual approach to attaining wealth. With the guidance from this book you can take control of your mental, emotional and physical factors of achieving goals and making those smart decisions that count.

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      3. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell

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        This book illustrates that little things can really make an enormous difference in your life. It emphasizes tapping into the power of creativity and getting the best of the magic moments it offers. A small idea could ignite great things and lead to extraordinary and outstanding accomplishments.

        4. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck

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          It all starts from the mind. How we think and what we think about is what can lead us to immense success. Where we are supposed to be all starts from how we think it. According to psychologist Carol Dweck of the famous Stanford University, our mindset determines the success we can get from our business, relationships and even parenting.

          5. Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind by Al Ries, Jack Trout

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            Positioning methods could put you in the right place and distinguish from the rest of the pack. According to the authors of this book, how you position yourself could be in form of branding, management and marketing. To excel you have to understand the difference in consumer behaviors and trends. Positioning makes you seen and heard in a noisy marketplace.

            6. Thick Face, Black Heart: The Warrior Philosophy for Conquering the Challenges of Business and Life by Chin-Ning Chu

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              What this Asian author offers you is from ancient Chinese military wisdom. How you can apply these principles from the listed practices could determine how efficient you can be in your field of entrepreneurship and career. According to Success magazine, the information and material in this book could be as vital as that in Napoleon’s Hill bestseller, “Think and Grow Rich.”

              7. Helping People Win at Work: A Business Philosophy Called “Don’t Mark My Paper, Help Me Get an A” by Ken Blanchard, Garry Ridge

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                In this book the author identifies the secret of productivity and attaining more. According to them a satisfied worker will always attain more than an unsatisfied worker. It is important for business leaders and employers to help people attain more satisfaction at what they do and their success will propel your organization or career. The game plan is to help people win first and you will also win.

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                8. Rework by Jason Fried

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                  Co-founder of 37 Signals, Jason Fried talks about how you can start and be successful at owning your own business. Business ventures may be what will offer you the opportunity to get wealthy easier and exponentially. According to Jason Fried, becoming successful at your business goes beyond drafting a plan and approaching success through the conventional approach can be harmful.

                  9. How to Get Ideas by Jack Foster

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                    This book focuses on how you can develop new ideas which certainly will trigger your success and wealth. Jack Foster shares his techniques on how to generate amazing ideas and making them a part of your career and business endeavors.

                    10. Creativity Workout: 62 Exercises to Unlock Your Most Creative Ideas by Edward Bono

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                      In this book creativity is explained as an important element in career success and is discussed expansively. According to Edward Bono, creativity is not a skill for only a few people. Rather it is up to every one of us to tap into the creative juices that is actually present in every one of us.

                      To get rich with ease will not be so daunting if you take a shot at any of these books.

                      Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

                      More by this author

                      Casey Imafidon

                      Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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                      1 5 Values of an Effective Leader 2 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 3 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work) 4 30 Practical Ideas to Create Your Best Morning Routine 5 Is People Management the Right Career Path for You?

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      More on Building Habits

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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