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The 5 Best Websites To Make Money Online

The 5 Best Websites To Make Money Online

The internet is a beautifully simple marketplace for people to make money, and get paid for their services. We’ve compiled the five best places for you to make money online, whether you want to start your own business – or just make a little extra on the side.

Site 1: Elance

elance screenshot

    Elance is the Internet’s biggest marketplace for legitimate freelance work. And, it’s my personal favourite of all the websites in this list.

    It provides a simple interface that allows you to search for jobs in any kind of niche. From Writing and Translation, to Web Design and Programming.

    Basically, people post jobs they want doing on the website, and you submit a proposal for it. It’s that simple. 

    Regardless of how much money you want to make, the possibilities are endless: there are freelancers on subscribed making $1,000 to $100,000 a year.

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    Pros: Free service. Simple to use. Easy to manage Tax Documents. Verified, trustworthy jobs.

    Cons: Can be slow to become established. Bad Freelancers willing to work for $1-$2 an hour.

    Site 2: Fiverr

    Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 08.36.25

      Fiverr is a long established freelance site where everything costs a $5 minimum. It’s a simple and easy to use website, where you post the services you can provide: and if someone needs them, they’ll pay you to work.

      It takes the traditional Freelance way of working and turns it on it’s head. It also ensures you get paid before you complete any work so that you never find yourself ripped off.

      There is also scope to earn more than your $5 per job, with different levels for different services, such as: early delivery dates, extra work or ‘bolt-on’s for your services.

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      Pros: Protected payment before work. No marketing required. Work is on your terms. Quick and Easy to set up.

      Cons: Lots of competition for work. Hard to establish a business. Have to do your own accountancy books. Not much scope to build a solid income.

      Site 3: oDesk

      Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 08.40.02

        oDesk is somewhat of a sister company to eLance, that helps freelancers find work in a wide range of areas. Out of the two sites, it’s down to your personal preference: but the oDesk’s design and Payment tracker app set it apart from the competition.

        This is a great website to get started on as a beginner as the average prices for jobs is lower, and it’s much easier to establish yourself as an up and coming freelancer.

        Pros: Good design. Simple set up. Great for beginners. Easy to use interface.

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        Cons: Prices can be too low if you’re looking to build a big business.

        Site 4: Craigslist

        Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 08.45.54

          Craigslist isn’t a site you’d think synonymous with Freelance Work – but it’s actually a hub of jobs and work to apply for.

          It’s a simple and easy to way to start to build a portfolio and make some money in the process. The normal client can vary between local businesses, college students and someone looking to get work done as quickly as possible.

          Air on the side of caution though, as sometimes you can find yourself chasing money for work you’ve done.

          Pros: Easy to get started. Low pressure environment. Constant stream of new jobs. Easy money.

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          Cons: Not always reputable clients.

          Site 5: Freelancer

          Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 08.41.55

            Freelancer is a ‘gameified’ version of the sites eLance and oDesk mentioned earlier. You have the ability to ‘level up’ by earning experience points from the projects you complete and the milestones you hit. There are no shortage of jobs on these sites and everything is channelled depending on your skills and abilities.

            Freelancer doesn’t have a free option that is as flexible as it’s competitors, and you find yourself paying to take tests and complete certain tasks.

            This plays into the hands of people posting projects, as it shows you’re committed and established, but it doesn’t really help you if you’re just getting started.

            Pros: Fun and easy to use interface. Interactive spin on normal freelancing. More reliable jobs than any other source.

            Cons: Paying for tests and membership makes it hard to access for low-budget new starters.

            Featured photo credit: Sanjay Kalyan via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on March 4, 2019

            How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

            How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

            Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

            I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

            Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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            Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

            Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

            Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

            I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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            I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

            If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

            Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

            The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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            Using Credit Cards with Rewards

            Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

            You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

            I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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            So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

            What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

            Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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