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How Much to Spend on an Engagement Ring

How Much to Spend on an Engagement Ring

The marriage proposal is probably the pinnacle of romantic planning. Every detail, from rose petals to candlelight kisses, revolves around that one special ring. Typically, the guys are expected to pick out the perfect ring. That’s a lot of pressure to put on men who, often, are not experts on buying women’s jewelry in the first place.

So what’s a guy to do?

Well, it all depends on if this proposal will be expected or not.

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The Surprise Proposal

This is a tough scenario. If you are completely in the dark about what her tastes and expectations are in a ring, finding the right one can be daunting. How much should you spend? That really depends on your budget and your bride.

According to weddingstats.org, the average cost of an engagement ring for 2013 is just under $5,000.

However, people spend on both sides of the spectrum. It really comes down to what you can afford, and what you feel will fit your lady’s personality and taste.

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The Planned Proposal

While I didn’t know when my man would drop to one knee, I knew it was coming. We had been talking about our future lives together from very early in our dating relationship. We actually went ring shopping in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and enjoyed being pampered by the jewelers with cushy seats and sparkling bubbly while I tried on all types of dazzling gemstones. He observed my choices and learned my taste.

Then, he took this information and found the perfect ring on his own. It made my ring much more special than if I had picked it out. It also added an element of surprise, as I didn’t know when he bought the ring or when he would pop the question.

Here are 3 things to consider when looking at the cost of the ring. (My husband did!)

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1. What price range is affordable?

While the last thing you want to do is go too cheap, you also don’t want to start off your marriage saddled with a huge debt. It’s the man, not the ring, that she is marrying. The guy who stays within a discussed budget will be laying the groundwork to trust him in other important financial matters later in the relationship. I was happy my husband was smart about his purchase and didn’t spend outside of our comfort zone. I have heard that two-month’s salary is a good indicator; but like all societal antidotal ideas, not necessarily worth following.

Before going ring shopping, ask yourself:

  • What is the earning potential of both people in the relationship?
  • Can you pay for the ring upfront from savings or do you have to finance it?
  • If you need to finance, what type of financing is available at what interest rate?
  • How fast can the debt be paid off?
  • What other expenses (wedding, house purchase, honeymoon) will you face going forward, and how will additional debt affect them?
  • How will purchasing an expensive luxury item affect pre-existing financial commitments?

While it’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of emotion buying an engagement ring, make sure you put serious thought into these questions and develop an existing price range before you let a smooth salesman turn your head.

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2. What type of ring best represents the woman?

Again, my husband knocked this one out of the park. Not only did he study my jewelry preferences, he went a step further and found a princess-cut setting for a beautiful single diamond. Since the translation of my name means Princess, I found that particularly romantic. He also knew that I wasn’t into flashy jewelry. I liked simple, elegant rings without a lot of extra gems. He found one single, gorgeous stone in a graceful platinum setting. Since I work with my hands a lot, my ring needed to be easy to clean and durable. He accounted for this. His ring choice fit me better than any other ring I ever tried on. Now, after eleven years, it hasn’t needed one repair and looks as new as the day he gave it to me.

Choosing the right ring means fitting it to the woman behind the ring. It means not just knowing her ring size, but knowing her heart. I am a tomboy. Rings equivalent to a mortgage downpayment make me nervous. I’m always afraid I will damage or lose them. I am more comfortable with a more practically-priced offering. Other women love to be frosted with expensive jewelry. The woman’s tastes affect the price.

3. What’s the best way to get the biggest bang for your buck?

My husband drove over two hours from our town to get to a large jewelry supplier. This supplier was able to offer him a ring without the retail markup of regular jewelry stores. Therefore, in cutting out the middle man, my ring was appraised at double the cost he actually spent on it. He stretched his dollar as far as it could go, so when he got on one knee and opened the box (complete with tiny light to make the ring extra sparkly), he knew he was giving me his best representation of his love for me without causing extra debt grief.

Buying the perfect engagement ring can be a difficult decision, but with a bit of planning, it doesn’t have to cause anxiety. Instead, the experience can be enjoyed as the centerpiece of a beautiful memory. I want to stress, a relationship doesn’t rise or fall on the cost of the ring. If it does, it certainly isn’t built on a deep enough foundation to last during the ups and downs of marriage. Whether you spend $1,000 or $10,000, the priceless part of the relationship is the love found as two hearts become one, not in the hardware. The ring is just the symbol—not the sum —of a successful marriage.

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Sarah Hansen

A corporate-sales professional turned entrepreneur

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Published on November 20, 2018

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The truth is, there are many “money saving guides” online, but most don’t cover the root issue for not saving.

Once I’d discovered a few key factors that allowed me to save 10k in one year, I realized why most articles couldn’t help me. The problem is that even with the right strategies you can still fail to save money. You need to have the right systems in place and the right mindset.

In this guide, I’ll cover the best ways to save money — practical yet powerful steps you can take to start saving more. It won’t be easy but with hard work, I’m confident you’ll be able to save more money–even if you’re an impulsive spender.

Why Your Past Prevents You from Saving Money

Are you constantly thinking about your financial mistakes?

If so, these thoughts are holding you back from saving.

I get it, you wish you could go back in time to avoid your financial downfalls. But dwelling over your past will only rob you from your future. Instead, reflect on your mistakes and ask yourself what lessons you can learn from them.

It wasn’t easy for me to accept that I had accumulated thousands of dollars in credit card debt. Once I did, I started heading in the right direction. Embrace your past failures and use them as an opportunity to set new financial goals.

For example, after accepting that you’re thousands of dollars in debt create a plan to be debt free in a year or two. This way when you’ll be at peace even when you get negative thoughts about your finances. Now you can focus more time on saving and less on your past financial mistakes.

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How to Effortlessly Track Your Spending

Stop manually tracking your spending.

Leverage powerful analytic tools such as Personal Capital and these money management apps to do the work for you. This tool has worked for me and has kept me motivated to why I’m saving in the first place. Once you login to your Personal Capital dashboard, you’re able to view your net worth.

When I’d first signed up with Personal Capital, I had a negative net worth, but this motivated me to save more. With this tool, you can also view your spending patterns, expenses, and how much money you’re saving.

Use your net worth as your north star to saving more. Whenever you experience financial setbacks, view how far you’ve come along. Saving money is only half the battle, being consistent is the other half.

The Truth on Why You Keep Failing

Saving money isn’t sexy. If it was, wouldn’t everyone be doing it?

Some people are natural savers, but most are impulsive spenders. Instead of denying that you’re an impulsive spender, embrace it.

Don’t try to save 60 to 70% of your income if this means you’ll live a miserable life. Saving money isn’t a race but a marathon. You’re saving for retirement and for large purchases.

If you’re currently having a hard time saving, start spending more money on nice things. This may sound counterintuitive but hear me out. Wouldn’t it be better to save $200 each month for 12 months instead of $500 for 3 months?

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Most people run into trouble because they create budgets that set them up for failure. This system won’t work for those who are frugal, but chances are they don’t need help saving. This system is for those who can’t save money and need to be rewarded for their hard work.

Only because you’re buying nice things doesn’t mean that you’ll save less. Here are some rules you should have in place:

  1. Save more than 50% of your available money (after expenses)
  2. Only buy nice things after saving
  3. Automate your savings with automatic bank transfers

These are the same rules that helped me save thousands each year while buying the latest iPhone. Focus only on items that are important to you. Remember, you can afford anything but not everything.

How to Foolproof Yourself out of Debt

Personal finance is a game. On one end, you’re earning money; and on the to other, you’re saving. But what ends up counting in the end isn’t how much you earn but how much you save. Research shows that about 60% of Americans spend more than they save.[1]

So how can you separate yourself from the 60%?

By not accumulating more debt. This way you’ll have more money to save and avoid having more financial obligations. A great way to stop accumulating debt is using cash to pay for all your transactions.

This will be challenging, depending on how reliant you are with your credit card, but it’s worth the effort. Not only will you stop accruing debt, but you’ll also be more conscious with what you buy.

For example, you’ll think twice about purchasing a new $200 headphone despite having the cash to buy them. According to a poll conducted by The CreditCards.com, 5 out of 6 Americans are impulsive spenders.[2]

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Telling yourself that you’ll have the discipline to not buy things won’t cut it. This is equal to having junk food in your fridge while trying to eat healthy–it’s only a matter of time before you slip. By using cash to make your purchases, you’ll spend less and save more.

A Proven Formula to Skyrocket Your Savings

Having proven systems in place to help you save more is important, but they’re not the best way to save money.

You can search for dozens of ways to save money, but there’ll always be a limit. Instead of spending the majority of your effort saving, look for ways to increase your income. The truth is that once you have the right systems in place, saving is easy.

What’s challenging is earning more money. There are many routes you can take to achieve this. For example, you can work long and hard at your current job to earn a raise. But there’s one problem–you’re depending on someone else to give you a raise.

Your company will have to have the budget, and you’ll have to know how to toot your own horn to get this raise. This isn’t to say that earning a raise is impossible, but things are better when you’re in control right? That’s why building a side-hustle is the best way to increase your income.

Think of your side-hustle as a part-time job doing something you enjoy. You can sell items on eBay for a profit, or design websites for small businesses. Building a side-hustle will be on the hardest things you’ll do, be too stubborn to quit.

During the early stages, you won’t be making money and that’s okay. Since you already have a source of income, you won’t be dependent on your side-hustle to pay for your expenses. Depending on how much time you invest in your side-hustle, it can one day replace your current income.

Whatever route you take, focus more on earning and save as much as possible. You have more control than you give yourself credit for.

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Transform Yourself into a Saving Money Machine

Saving money isn’t complicated but it’s one of the hardest things you’ll do.

By learning from your mistakes and rewarding yourself after saving you’ll save more. What would you do with an extra $200 or $500 each month? To some, this is life-changing money that can improve the quality of their lives.

The truth is saving money is an art. Save too much and you’ll quit, but save too little and you’ll pay for the consequences in the future. Saving money takes effort and having the right systems in place.

Imagine if you’d started saving an extra $100 this next month? Or, saved $20K in one year? Although it’s hard to imagine, this can be your reality if you follow the principles covered in this guide.

Take a moment to brainstorm which goals you’d be able to reach if you had extra money each month. Use these goals as motivation to help you stay on track on your journey to saving more. If I was able to save thousands of dollars with little guidance, imagine what you’ll be able to do.

What are you waiting for? Go and start saving money, the sky is your limit.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

Reference

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