Advertising

8 Fun, Must Read Books for Kids That Teach Valuable Money Lessons

Advertising
8 Fun, Must Read Books for Kids That Teach Valuable Money Lessons

It’s a popular complaint among young adults these days that their schools never taught them personal finances. How to balance a check book, how to do taxes, and the value of money. Since its less and less likely for schools to change their curriculum, that means it is up to parents to teach their kids how money works. Here are a collection of books to help teach your kids about money.

1. Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money by Emily Jenkins

Money Lessons

    One of the earliest experiences a child has in becoming an entrepreneur is opening a lemonade stand. In this book, two kids open a lemonade stand in the middle of winter. It teaches some basic math and entrepreneurship and it also teaches kids that something may not be a good idea even if it sounds like one. If there is anything kids should learn early, it’s how to deal with disappointment so they can bounce back and try again.

    2. Bunny Money (Max and Ruby) by Rosemary Wells

    Advertising

    Money Lessons

      Learning how to budget money is an important skill to learn. In Bunny Money, Max and Ruby have saved up $100 to buy gifts for their grandparents. Unfortunately, some things happen and they have to spend some of it. It’s a great book to teach kids how to budget and save money. There are also some math skills involved and it teaches kids that emergencies can drain your wallet unexpectedly. It’s some life lessons definitely worth learning.

      3. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat by Simms Taback

      Money Lessons

        What happens when a kid breaks something? They immediately ask for another one! In Simms Taback’s Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, a child can see a story that shows the value of re-using things. In the story, Joseph’s overcoat is really nice but it starts to get worn. Joseph continuously re-uses the material from the coat to make other items until it becomes a cloth button. The book is great for teaching kids how to be frugal and the importance of re-using things. Until they grow up and get a good job, they may end up having to find creative uses for things they thought were ruined.

        4. Annie’s Adventures (The Sisters 8) by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

        Advertising

        Money Lessons

          The jungle of nonsense that is adult finances is tough enough to get a hold of even if you know what you’re doing. In Annie’s Adventures (The Sisters 8), Annie is put in charge of her parents finances. She has to figure out how to write checks, pay the bills, and balance a budget. It’s a delightfully lighthearted adventure that puts a fun spin on the basics of adult finance management. There are even elements of entrepreneurship and frugality. It’s a really great choice and it’s especially great for girls.

          5. The Lemonade War by Jacqueline Davies

          Money Lessons

            The Lemonade War is a humorous and fun adventure about two siblings who open two lemonade stands. They use some simple ideas to take their lemonade war to ridiculous heights and it’s a truly fun read for kids. The book teaches entrepreneurship, money management skills, how to implement ideas to challenge the competition, and other business-oriented lessons that are essential for tomorrow’s business leaders.

            6. Junior’s Adventures: The Boxed Set by Dave Ramsey

            Advertising

            Money Lessons

              Okay so this is actually a series of books rather than a single one but all of the books revolve around a central premise. In these books, Junior learns the value of working, saving money, spending money, and the pleasure of giving to others. They teach selflessness and how intelligent money decisions can allow you to have nicer things. Kids definitely need to learn the value of the dollar and this is a good series of books to do it!

              7. One Hen: How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference by Katie Smith Milway

              Money Lessons

                One thing that no one really learns before graduation high school is how to manage a loan. Or what you need a loan for. In this story, a boy from Ghana named Kojo takes out a loan and uses it to start a farm to feed and provide for his family. It’s based on true events and it’s a heart warming story of a boy who learns the value of money, how loans work, and how to start a business with very little.

                8. The Federal Reserve comics by The Federal Reserve

                Advertising

                Money Lessons

                  Yes friends, this is a real thing. The Federal Reserve has a host of comics that illustrate lessons about money. It is a comic and the situations are a little more mature than these other ones so we recommend either reading these to your kids or waiting until they’re old enough to understand them. The link above goes to the search page where you can download the PDFs of each comic for free.

                  Wrap up

                  There are a whole bunch of children’s books out there that teach a great number of things. A lot of them will come through personal experience or through school. However, money management is something that rests almost solely on parents. It’s tough to do but with books like these you can teach your child the value of a dollar and the value of work.

                  Featured photo credit: Indiana Public Media via indianapublicmedia.org

                  More by this author

                  Joseph Hindy

                  A writer, editor, and YouTuber who likes to share about technology and lifestyle tips.

                  9 Best Apartment Search Websites You Need To Know 15 Most Scenic Train Routes On Earth You Must Visit 12 Inspirational Speeches That Teach You the Most Valuable Life Lessons 10 Benefits of Sleeping Naked You Probably Didn’t Know 15 Most Effective Cool Down Exercises For Every Workout

                  Trending in Money

                  1 33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now 2 How To Achieve Financial Freedom With the Right Mindset 3 Financial Freedom is Not a Fantasy: 9 Secrets to Get You There 4 40 Healthy And Really Delicious Meals You Can Make Under $5 5 Life Insurance: A Secure Way To Protect Your Future.

                  Read Next

                  Advertising
                  Advertising

                  Last Updated on January 5, 2022

                  33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

                  Advertising
                  33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

                  In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

                  Some easy ways to save money:

                  Advertising

                  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
                  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
                  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
                  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
                  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
                  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
                  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
                  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
                  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
                  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
                  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
                  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
                  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
                      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
                    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
                    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
                    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
                    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
                    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
                    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
                    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
                    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
                    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
                    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
                    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
                    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
                    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
                    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
                    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
                    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
                    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
                    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
                    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
                    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

                    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

                    Advertising

                    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

                    Advertising

                    Advertising

                    Read Next