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4 Reasons Why Working For Someone Else Won’t Get You Rich

4 Reasons Why Working For Someone Else Won’t Get You Rich

A lot of people have big dreams of running their own business and being their own boss, especially in this economy where small businesses are flourishing. Do you have an idea for a business, store, or service you’d like to start? I’ve had many ideas, but something always keeps me from acting on them. Usually, it’s initial capital. I always feel like I need to bide my time working at my current job, saving up as much as I can, then try to launch my own business once I have my savings built up.

This seems like a practical approach, right? So why am I still not working for myself? Because I’m not taking risks. To get rich, I have to be my own boss. And to be my own boss, I have to take a risk, put myself out there, and make my money work for me.

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Bill Gates dropped out of Harvard to start a software company. He was in school, learning technology without a definite study or career plan, until his friend wanted to open a business with him. So Bill became a partner in a company; then… well, you know the rest. You know what happened because he became one of the richest, most successful people in the world, all because he took a risk. He left one of the best universities in the world to start a business, and look how that paid off!

Amanda Hocking wrote novels in her free time, and had 17 written by 2010. Instead of just letting these idle on her hard drive, she started self-publishing them as e-books. In just a year, she had sold over one million copies of nine books, and had made over two million dollars. This was unheard of for a self-published author! She sold an average of 9,000 books a day, which caught the attention of a big publishing house, who signed her. All of this happened because she just decided to take a risk and put her writing out there. Pretty inspirational, right? What can you do to make this type of success happen for you?

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1. You become too comfortable to take risks.

My main problem is that I have a job, which means I have income. I can pay my bills. I have a little left at the end of each month to put into savings. It’s comfortable! I don’t need to change anything. Which means I haven’t. You have to push yourself to make a change in a comfortable lifestyle. If I lost my job, I’d have no choice but to kick-start my dream in order to have a job and income! So do something to shake up your life, and see how one change can push you to take charge and change everything.

2. You’re building someone else’s assets.

When you’re working for someone else, you’re helping them. This is well and good if you believe in the cause and just want to get by in life; but if you want to get rich, you’re only hurting yourself. You’re spending at least forty hours a week focusing on someone else. What about you, and what you want to do? Imagine if you have 40 free hours to work on something for yourself. It’s a lot of time, right? Once you get out of your comfortable career rut, you’ll have those forty hours to dedicate to yourself and your own assets. Everything you put into yourself and your business will come right back to you. The money you spend for the business can be deducted from your taxes, and any income is yours alone!

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3. Time is more valuable than money.

Money is something you can save, something you can get more of (if you know how). But time is fleeting. You’ll never be able to make up time you’ve already spent. And, as we just mentioned, when you spend time working for someone else, you’re not able to use that for yourself. Sure, you’re making money while you work, but what if you finish your duties before lunch? You’re wasting the other hours of the day doing nothing, just to get that paycheck. Or, if you’re on salary, you might be working way more than forty hours, and not getting paid what you’re worth. The company you work for is in charge of your time. They dictate your schedule, they tell you when you can leave early or have to stay late, and they tell you if you can take vacation time. When you work for yourself, you might have to work harder, but you’re working for yourself, in charge of your own time.

4. You grow too focused on saving for a rainy day.

Saving is smart. We’ve all learned that, and it makes sense. But saving money isn’t helping you make money. Skipping Starbucks and making coffee at home might save you 5 bucks, but did it earn you 5 bucks? If it did, I want your coffee maker! You’re making a fixed income, and just putting money aside. Invest your money in your business, instead! Or if you’re not ready yet, invest in the stock market to watch your money grow.

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Yes, it’s hard to get something started, but you have to take the chance! And maybe it won’t take off immediately, but that doesn’t mean you’re a failure. Be patient, let your business find its footing and and follow through on things that will help you grow. Don’t expect everything to happen all at once, and don’t get discouraged — you can do it!

Featured photo credit: Nick Ares via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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