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13 Basic Rules To Grow Your Wealth Effectively

13 Basic Rules To Grow Your Wealth Effectively

Perhaps you started this year vowing to grow personally, expand professionally, or simply grow up.  Do you also want to grow your wealth?

While no two financial pictures are exactly the same, healthy portfolios do have similarities. Follow these 13 rules to grow your wealth effectively.

Think of money as a tool.

That’s all those papers and coins are — a tool to get you what you want. They aren’t the only way, but it is a universally accepted exchange. Thinking of money as a tool empowers you to avoid many of the negative, intense emotions that can be associated with it, and to make rational, calm spending and saving decisions free of emotion. Money is a tool. That’s it.

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Accept that it takes time to expand your tool kit.

It takes time to grow wealth. Period. “Time” in this case means years, sometimes decades. This can be a frustrating concept for young folks who are rarin’ to earn that cash, accustomed to getting what they want with the click of a button and bombarded by stories of internet sensations who made it big overnight and photographs of 20-somethings with luxury cars and diamonds in their ears.

Define “wealth”…

Do you desire a fat bank account, for uses to be determined in the future? The ability to fund an expensive hobby, like horses or photography? The chance to take years off work and afford time to raise your young children? Your definition of “wealth” may, or may not, be a McMansion and six sports cars. Whatever your definition is, congratulations! You’ve established a goal that is yours. Your definition of “wealth” is the one that matters.

… then define “wealth” again.

Accept that you will end up spending vast amounts of money on unplanned expenses. Your car will break down. You will have kids before you’re financially ready. You or a loved one will incur a hefty medical bill. This is called life. Money, that tool we keep in our pockets, will help us meet life challenges. So take a deep breath, relax, and accept the fact that your financial goals will change time and time again. Staying calm during times of unexpected spending will help you keep your eye on the long-term prize; freaking out or giving up on your savings plan in the face of adversity will not.

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Acknowledge that cash is king.

If you can’t pay cash for it, you can’t afford it. Treat your credit cards like cash; this means sticking to a lifestyle that suits your income level so you don’t rack off more than you can afford, and paying them off regularly. Do your best to avoid assuming car loans — if you can’t pay the sticker price, search for a used car or take advantage of public transportation for as long as possible. If you have a take a home loan, keep it modest, and wait to look at homes until you can afford to put at least 20% down.

Save.

This is frequently repeated advice, and for good reason — the secret to growing wealth is to accumulate it. Read up on the latest from accountants and peruse personal stories online, check books out of the library, or hire a consultant through your bank to help with financial planning; however you do it, you must develop a savings plan. Once you have at least six months of living expenses for you and your family readily available, you can start to grow your wealth through different types of funds, according to the level of risk you want to assume.

Diversify your tool kit.

Talk to a certified professional about the benefits and drawbacks of savings accounts, stocks, certificates of deposit, IRAs, mutual funds, and any other number of savings and investment options. The key word here is “diversify.” You want to build a broad foundation, so that if something unfortunate happens to any one area of interest, your financial ship simply bobs along in a different direction, it doesn’t sink (and neither do you). Remember that purchasing land or a rental property, or upgrading a home you currently own are also ways to invest.

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Shop around until you find a no-fee, cash back credit card.

Avoid complicated rewards point structures, or even airfare cards unless you are a frequent traveler; it can be difficult to gauge whether you will actually use these rewards and the value back on each dollar that you spend can be minimal. Annual fees add up and mean you often end up paying for your plane ticket or hotel room yourself with the fee. Once you find a card you like, stick with it for maximum benefit to your credit score.

Shop around, period.

It is tempting to purchase what we want, when we see it. Online shopping, however, means that nearly every product can be compared to a competitor, whether in your community or across the globe. Take the time to compare prices before you buy, especially on big ticket items. Once you have a good feel for the market, don’t be shy about negotiating for a lower price from a local merchant if you find an item cheaper elsewhere.

Expand your mind.

Get creative in seeking out ways to increase income — there are a lot of ways to earn money out there. Make a list of your skills, whether learned in a professional setting or elsewhere, then hop online to do some research, and talk to everyone you meet about how to possibly leverage those skills. Your local chamber of commerce, or meet up groups advertised online, can be good places to start. It’s a freelancing nation, and you may be surprised at what and how much you can pick up on the side of conventional employment.

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Get your hands dirty.

Nothing is ever “too small” or “beneath you” in the money-growing game. Do not shirk from the hard jobs, the dirty jobs, or those that pay only a little in the beginning — pick them up, see where they go, and remember to save, save, save.

Find a good accountant.

Once you have money, you don’t want to give it away, do you? That’s exactly what you do come tax time — give your hard-earned cash back to the government. Tax codes are complicated, to say the least, so make sure you are giving exactly what you owe and not a penny more by enlisting the help of a seasoned professional. Though Certified Public Accountants are more expensive than do-it-yourself options, what they save you this year and in the years to come truly make this investment worth it.

Treat money management like a job.

Set aside time each week to review your financial accounts. If you’re starting out, this time may be as simple as going over your credit card statement to confirm that every charge is legitimate; if your financial picture is intricate and complicated, this could mean a weekly meeting with your financial planner or bank. Take time to study articles online, read a book from the library, or attend a local class that will teach you more about what all of those financial terms mean and how they apply to you.

Want to make progress today?  Find out The #1 Thing Stopping You From Becoming Rich Right Now 

Featured photo credit: Alan Cleaver via Flickr

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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