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These 10 Reasons Will Convince Anyone To Stop Giving Children Handheld Devices

These 10 Reasons Will Convince Anyone To Stop Giving Children Handheld Devices

Studies have shown that infants 0-2 years should not be exposed to any technology, children 3-5 years old should be limited to an hour a day, and ages 6-18 should be limited to two hours a day. This might sound strict – and I certainly remember watching more than two hours of TV when I was a teenager – but there are reasons these recommendations are in place.

1. Rapid Brain Growth

Rapid brain growth is affected by technology. From the ages of 0-2, infants’ brains triple in size! This rapid growth continues until you’re 21 years old. While your brain is developing, it’s important to use a wide variety of motor skills instead of just staring at a screen. It’s more important to learn how to grasp things, turn things, button buttons and zip zippers than it is to know how to poke at a graphic.

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2. Sleep Deprivation

Even as an adult, you know how hard it is to turn off the phone and go to sleep! If I can’t sleep, I pick up my phone and start playing games, and before I know it, morning’s arrived. Imagine if you’re a kid with all this technology at your fingertips. I didn’t have a computer in my room as a kid, but it was hard enough for me to get off the family computer at bedtime. If I could have stayed online all hours of the night, I know I would have. It’s too easy to deprive yourself of sleep when you think you have something better going on. Restricting usage of technology and handheld devices will help ensure your child gets enough sleep.

3. Digital Dementia

Studies show being exposed to so much media so fast increases occurrences of attention deficit disorder. Watching so much on a screen causes your brain to “prune” the neuronal tracks that run to the frontal lobe, which decreases your ability to concentrate and form memories. When you’re a child, not being able to pay attention means you won’t be able to learn and retain information.

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4. Delayed Development

If you’re just sitting around, staring and poking at a touch screen, your body isn’t using its muscles enough for development. Physical movement enhances a child’s ability to learn and pay attention, so it’s important they use a lot of their body for playing and learning as they grow.

5. Epidemic Obesity

Obesity is a logical concern if you’re talking about children sitting and staring at a screen instead of going outside to play. Studies have shown that children with a TV in their bedrooms have a 30% increased occurrence of obesity. Limiting children’s exposure to technology and encouraging them to exercise and play outside will help decrease chances of diabetes, strokes, and heart attacks later in life.

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6. Aggression

There is a lot of back and forth on the argument that violent games cause children to act violently, but it’s true that children re-enact things they see. Being exposed to violence, sexual deviance, and gore at a young age will influence them. It’s also possible that they will be more aggressive just because playing games can be frustrating at times, when you’re so close to winning and then mess up. I’ll admit to throwing a game controller or two…

7. Mental Illness

An overexposure to technology has been shown to increase childhood depression, autism, anxiety, attention deficit disorder, attachment disorders, bipolar disorder, psychosis, and problematic behavior. It’s better for children to engage in physical and social activities away from technology.

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8. Unsustainable Lifestyle

Yes, technology is unavoidable in today’s society, and everyone should know how to use it. But if it’s all children are ever exposed to, then it’s all they’ll know. It’s important for children to be well-rounded, so they’ll have more opportunities open to them as they grow.

9. Radiation Emissions

Children’s brains are still developing, so they are more sensitive to radiation emissions coming from handheld devices. The World Health Organization has classified wireless devices as emitting possible carcinogens, which means you can’t be too careful. Whether the emissions are cancerous or not, they can still affect the development of a child’s brain and immune system.

10. Addictions

As adults we are often addicted to technology, which means we are detaching from social situations around us – including being with our kids. This sets a bad example for the kids because they think it’s OK to do the same. They also aren’t being interacted with as much, so they turn to technology themselves. When playing with technology is one of the only things you have to do, it’s incredibly easy to get addicted!

Featured photo credit: tinkerbard via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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