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Improve Life Quality Now by Enjoying Your Sundays

Improve Life Quality Now by Enjoying Your Sundays

Try a quick exercise. Look over your past week and see how much of your time was spent on work. Work also includes house chores, grocery shopping, errands, and minding the children. If work represents one of six slices of a pie chart, how big is that slice? Quite big, I bet.

We work hard so we can afford holidays or a move to a bigger home and improve life quality.  Don’t wait for a holiday or a new home to bring balance to your life.  Reserve Sundays for doing meaningful things you don’t get to do on weekdays and improve life quality now.

1. Slow Down

Turn off the alarm. If your internal clock wakes you up at the usual hour, use the time for deep breathing exercises or read inspiring quotes and experience positive emotions.  If you wake up late, that’s great! You’ve begun to enjoy your Sunday.

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The point here is to not have a schedule. Letting the day flow will allow more leisure time for recreational activities and for doing them at a leisurely pace.

2. Disconnect Electronically

Is this hard for you to do? Look back to an instance when you felt toxic and were ready to toss your phone out the window to get 15 minutes of uninterrupted time. This will make it easier to put your phone on silent and out of sight. Now is the time to give your laptop and other devices a rest too.  You may be surprised to discover engaging things to do minus your devices.

3. Notice and Appreciate Things

No strict schedules and no electronic devices equals a space of silence and freedom to just BE. Heighten your senses and attention to find joy in the simplest things—homey kitchen smells, new grass, children’s laughter, a leisurely shower, or your relaxed breathing. To measurably improve life quality, be aware of and appreciate the things that bring quality to your life.

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4. Enhance Your Home

The spaces you move around in affect your well being. Home is where you wake up every morning. Enjoy Sunday by engaging in a hobby—art, crafts, carpentry, gardening—and decorate your home in the process.  No such hobbies? Try rearranging the furniture, adding a couple of throw pillows, and organizing your book shelf, kitchen cabinet, or wardrobe closet.  Your enhanced living space would then be a pleasant place to come home to.

5. Sit Down for a Meal

Is your weekday breakfast an on-the-go affair where you munch on a sandwich as you hurry to the subway station?  How often do you get to have dinner with your family or partner?  Sunday is when family and friends can sit down, share a meal, and chat in a relaxed atmosphere.  Have fun preparing the meal together at home or make it a restaurant treat.

Ask light questions to get conversation going.  Be positive, listen fully, and appreciate these wonderful people you share your life with.

6. Help Someone Out

It could be your child asking for your opinion on a school project, an elderly neighbor needing some company, or a request for volunteers to pack relief goods for disaster victims.  Helping others moves focus away from yourself and brings meaning to life beyond mere accomplishment.

7. Do Something Just for You

Make Sunday a day to reward yourself.  Get a haircut, buy that nice shirt you’ve been saving for, have a massage, watch a matinee or a sporting event, or stay home to read, play video games, or nap.  The only rule: it makes you happy and is good for your health.

8. Attend to a Spiritual Practice

A spiritual practice is an activity that reminds you of your connection to the divine source. It could be a full-day facilitated retreat, a Sunday service, a quiet jog in nature, a gratitude journal, insightful books, or inspiring music. Keeping a meaningful connection to the divine lightens your perspective in life.

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Sunday is a day to forget work and to rediscover other areas of your life. A consciously-spent Sunday helps you appreciate work and allows you to handle the week’s stress. You gain work-life balance that will improve life quality starting right now.

Featured photo credit: Marya Oct.Calendar via flickr

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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