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Last Updated on February 9, 2018

How to Become a Vegetarian Easily (It’s not that Hard as You Thought!)

How to Become a Vegetarian Easily (It’s not that Hard as You Thought!)

No matter it’s for a diet or a cleanse, you can have your own reason to become a vegetarian. The problem is, it is not easy. Many may have tried, failed and back out from it during their journey of becoming a vegetarian.

Sometimes willpower might just not be enough. Apart from motivating yourself like keeping a list of reasons and benefits to become a vegetarian, it’s important to figure out some clever methods.

I have been there before too.

I stopped eating meat in 2006 when I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. I learned so much about how meat and animal products affect our health. Research shows that MS patients, and people dealing with other autoimmune conditions, that eat fewer saturated fats and “inflammatory foods” maintain better health (I would challenge that this goes for most everyone.). Giving up meat was one of the best ways I could really “do something” about my new diagnosis. I stopped eating meat to achieve better health.

When I started my vegetarian journey, I started reading and through experimenting with different methods, I’ve consolidated the best tips below.

Don’t cut meat all at once. Start slowly

    Instead of eliminating all meat from your diet, eliminate one animal at a time. For instance, start with beef. Don’t eat it for 30 days. Then eliminate pork in addition to beef. Continue to eliminate a category of meat every 30 days. Eventually you’ll elimate all meat and seafood, but because of the gradual approach, it won’t feel unmanageable. Adjust the timeline to better suit your needs.

    Substitute meat with veggies strategically

    To regain the nutrition we get from meat, we need some substitutes:

      Why are those great foods to replace meat?

      1. Spinach

      Spinach is packed with iron when it is cooked. And it doesn’t contain as much fat as beef!

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      2. Beans

      There are countless kinds of beans in the market, but all of them could do the same job: protein replacement. They are high in protein, and can integrated into various dishes, making it really easy to cook with.

      3. Tofu

      Another widely used choice as a meat substitute. Not only does it provide a good amount of protein, it is also a good source of iron and calcium, and is believed to help lower levels of bad cholesterol.

      4. Eggplant

      Eggplant have always been one of the most used replacement of meat. Italians have been using them to mimic meat for centuries when the price of meat is too high. It also provides similar nutrient values to other food in this list.

      5. Avocado

      Avocado provides a large amount of proteins, fats and enzymes which are all common in meat. It is considered one of the “superfood” with its high nutrients value. Most important, it taste wonderful.

      6. Dairy and eggs

      It really depends on which type of vegetarian you are, but some do consider dairy products and eggs to be out of the list. So if you are not aiming at going “complete vegan”, these two items could be great replacements for the lost of meat.

      Beware of additives! Many of them are not vegetarian

      Being vegan meant that you will have to start learning how to read labels on products. Many additives and thickeners like gelatin are animal products which you should avoid. Sometimes products might specify they are for vegan, but for most of them you will need to read the allergen label or the ingredient chart to find out. Remember to do some research and mark down the items that are not for vegetarian. Here are some names that you should know:

      Lists of non-vegan products

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      • Carmine/cochineal (E120) – red pigment of crushed female cochineal beetle, used as a food colouring

      • Casein – from milk (a protein)

      • Lactose – from milk (a sugar)

      • Whey – from milk. Whey powder is in many products, look out for it in crisps, bread and baked products etc.

      • Collagen – from the skin, bones, and connective tissues of animals such as cows, chickens, pigs, and fish – used in cosmetics

      • Elastin – found in the neck ligaments and aorta of bovine, similar to collagen

      • Keratin – from the skin, bones, and connective tissues of animals such as cows, chickens, pigs, and fish

      • Gelatine/gelatin – obtained by boiling skin, tendons, ligaments, and/or bones and is usually from cows or pigs. Used in jelly, chewy sweets, cakes, and in vitamins; as coating/capsules

      • Aspic – industry alternative to gelatine; made from clarified meat, fish or vegetable stocks and gelatine

      • Lard/tallow – animal fat

      • Shellac – obtained from the bodies of the female scale insect Tachardia lacca

      • Honey – food for bees, made by bees

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      • Beeswax (E901) – made from the honeycomb of bees, found in lipsticks, mascaras, candles, crayons etc.

      • Propolis – used by bees in the construction of their hives

      • Royal Jelly – secretion of the throat gland of the honeybee

      • Vitamin D3 – from fish-liver oil; in creams, lotions and other cosmetics

      • Lanolin (E913) – from the oil glands of sheep, extracted from their wool – in many skin care products and cosmetics

      • Albumen/albumin – from egg (typically)

      • Isinglass – a substance obtained from the dried swim bladders of fish, and is used mainly for the clarification of wine and beer

      • Cod liver oil – in lubricating creams and lotions, vitamins and supplements

      • Pepsin – from the stomachs of pigs, a clotting agent used in vitamins

      Veganuary: Vegan Label Reading Guide

      Look for appealing vegan recipes to make it funnier

      When you got into the vegetarian lifestyle, you also opened the gate to a paradise of new food. There are many recipes out there catering to vegetarians which are filled with creativity and uniqueness. You can have a wide range of food for you to explore and experience. Here are some recipe made with the food mentioned above, you might just find the one for your dinner tonight:

      Spinach and Mozzarella Egg Bake 

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        Creamy Avocado and Spinach Pasta

           

          Vegan Buffalo Wings

             

            Eggplant Cacciatore

              Read and educate yourself with more reasons to stay off the meat

              While you are making the switch to becoming a vegetarian, read vegetarian blogs, Vegetarian Times magazine and books like

              These would reinforce your determination to become a vegetarian!

              Just answer meat eaters’ questions kindly and don’t expect them to join you

              You may experience resistance and questions about becoming a vegetarian, especially from close friends and family that don’t want to change. Be kind when answering questions and don’t expect anyone to join you. Share great vegetarian meals. Say “no thank you” when offered meat, and focus on your own commitment instead of what other people say or think.

              More by this author

              Courtney Carver

              Courtney Carver is a speaker, author, productivity expert and founder of Be More with Less.

              How to Become a Vegetarian Easily (It’s not that Hard as You Thought!) How Living Clutter-free Will Make You a Better Decision Maker How to Love the Unlovable 3 Strategies to Generate Creative Energy

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              Last Updated on November 20, 2018

              10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

              10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

              A new year beautifully symbolizes a new chapter opening in the book that is your life. But while so many people like you aspire to achieve ambitious goals, only 12% of you will ever experience the taste of victory. Sound bad? It is. 156 million people (that’s 156,000,000) will probably give up on their resolution before you can say “confetti.” Keep on reading to learn why New Year’s resolutions fail (and how to succeed).

              Note: Since losing weight is the most common New Year’s resolution, I chose to focus on weight loss (but these principles can be applied to just about any goal you think of — make it work for you!).

              1. You’re treating a marathon like a sprint.

              Slow and steady habit change might not be sexy, but it’s a lot more effective than the “I want it ALL and I want it NOW!” mentality. Small changes stick better because they aren’t intimidating (if you do it right, you’ll barely even notice them!).

              If you have a lot of bad habits today, the last thing you need to do is remodel your entire life overnight. Want to lose weight? Stop it with the crash diets and excessive exercise plans. Instead of following a super restrictive plan that bans anything fun, add one positive habit per week. For example, you could start with something easy like drinking more water during your first week. The following week, you could move on to eating 3 fruits and veggies every day. And the next week, you could aim to eat a fistful of protein at every meal.

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              2. You put the cart before the horse.

              “Supplementing” a crappy diet is stupid, so don’t even think about it. Focus on the actions that produce the overwhelming amount of results. If it’s not important, don’t worry about it.

              3. You don’t believe in yourself.

              A failure to act can cripple you before you leave the starting line. If you’ve tried (and failed) to set a New Year’s resolution (or several) in the past, I know it might be hard to believe in yourself. Doubt is a nagging voice in your head that will resist personal growth with every ounce of its being. The only way to defeat doubt is to believe in yourself. Who cares if you’ve failed a time or two? This year, you can try again (but better this time).

              4. Too much thinking, not enough doing.

              The best self-help book in the world can’t save you if you fail to take action. Yes, seek inspiration and knowledge, but only as much as you can realistically apply to your life. If you can put just one thing you learn from every book or article you read into practice, you’ll be on the fast track to success.

              5. You’re in too much of a hurry.

              If it was quick-and-easy, everybody would do it, so it’s in your best interest to exercise your patience muscles.

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              6. You don’t enjoy the process.

              Is it any wonder people struggle with their weight when they see eating as a chore and exercise as a dreadful bore? The best fitness plan is one that causes the least interruption to your daily life. The goal isn’t to add stress to your life, but rather to remove it.

              The best of us couldn’t bring ourselves to do something we hate consistently, so make getting in shape fun, however you’ve gotta do it. That could be participating in a sport you love, exercising with a good friend or two, joining a group exercise class so you can meet new people, or giving yourself one “free day” per week where you forget about your training plan and exercise in any way you please.

              7. You’re trying too hard.

              Unless you want to experience some nasty cravings, don’t deprive your body of pleasure. The more you tell yourself you can’t have a food, the more you’re going to want it. As long as you’re making positive choices 80-90% of the time, don’t sweat the occasional indulgence.

              8. You don’t track your progress.

              Keeping a written record of your training progress will help you sustain an “I CAN do this” attitude. All you need is a notebook and a pen. For every workout, record what exercises you do, the number of repetitions performed, and how much weight you used if applicable. Your goal? Do better next time. Improving your best performance on a regular basis offers positive feedback that will encourage you to keep going.

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              9. You have no social support.

              It can be hard to stay motivated when you feel alone. The good news? You’re not alone: far from it. Post a status on Facebook asking your friends if anybody would like to be your gym or accountability buddy. If you know a co-worker who shares your goal, try to coordinate your lunch time and go out together so you’ll be more likely to make positive decisions. Join a support group of like-minded folks on Facebook, LinkedIn, or elsewhere on the internet. Strength in numbers is powerful, so use it to your advantage.

              10. You know your what but not your why.

              The biggest reason why most New Year’s resolutions fail: you know what you want but you not why you want it.

              Yes: you want to get fit, lose weight, or be healthy… but why is your goal important to you? For example:

              Do you want to be fit so you can be a positive example that your children can admire and look up to?

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              Do you want to lose fat so you’ll feel more confident and sexy in your body than ever before?

              Do you want to be healthy so you’ll have increased clarity, energy, and focus that would carry over into every single aspect of your life?

              Whether you’re getting in shape because you want to live longer, be a good example, boost your energy, feel confident, have an excuse to buy hot new clothes, or increase your likelihood of getting laid (hey, I’m not here to judge) is up to you. Forget about any preconceived notions and be true to yourself.

              • The more specific you can make your goal,
              • The more vivid it will be in your imagination,
              • The more encouraged you’ll be,
              • The more likely it is you will succeed (because yes, you CAN do this!).

              I hope this guide to why New Year’s resolutions fail helps you achieve your goals this year. If you found this helpful, please pass it along to some friends so they can be successful just like you. What do you hope to accomplish next year?

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