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7 Effective Ways to Get Amazing Sleep

7 Effective Ways to Get Amazing Sleep

Life seems to get more and more hectic. Our days seem to be more and more packed with demands on our time. And the one area of life where we often feel we should improve (but seldom do) is that of sleep. Nobody is still quite sure of the optimum amount of sleep, or even if such a thing exists. But one thing is for certain – there’s nothing that beats feeling refreshed after a night’s rest. So what are the ways to get the best out of a night’s sleep? Let’s take a look at some of the most effective methods:

1. Sleep hygiene

The term “sleep hygiene” might sound like it refers (somehow) to either washing or staying clean during sleep. But actually it refers to the conditions that are most conducive towards good sleep. The single most important thing you can do when addressing quality of sleep is to look at not just the physical factors (e.g. light levels in the room) but also the non-physical ones such as sleep cycles and bedtimes. Think of sleep hygiene as the overarching strategy towards a better night’s sleep, with everything else mentioned in this list as a series of actions in support of it.

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2. Respect your internal clock

To an extent, nature made us all creatures of habit. This is why, when after crossing time zones, we’re prone to jet-lag. Our habitual waking and sleeping cycles suddenly go up against a clock that seems to have its hour hand perpetually in the wrong place. You can work with your internal clock to help aid restful sleep by nit going against it. Many of us are apt to do this – and I am as guilty as anyone. The most familiar scenario is the average Friday or Saturday night. After a long week at work, you find yourself staying up later. And getting up later the next morning. By the time Monday morning rolls around, what do we have?  Yes, an out-of-sync body clock. What works for me is to ensure getting up at the same time every day (regardless of what time I went to sleep).

3. Gear up the right habits for optimum sleep

Much of what you do in the evening will likely have an effect on your night’s sleep. So – this goes without saying, really – plates of rich food, vigorous exercise, caffeine – all of these are to be avoided during the time prior to going to bed.  Chances are that after a certain time in the evening you wouldn’t feel like eating rich food or firing up the espresso maker anyway. But it’s good to be aware of the things that can boost sleep, such as being in a quiet place, being hydrated and avoiding too much ‘blue light’ (e.g. from computer screens) before bed.

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4. Ritualize and make associations

It’s amazing what the power of ritual can do to help sleep. It may be down to the fact that if you carry out a series of actions every night (say, setting the alarm clock, filling the hot water bottle, reading a few pages of a favourite book) you are sending signals to the brain that bedtime is near. It’s almost as if the subconscious starts to prepare your body for the sleep ahead. Some people use a ‘sleep aroma’ that they associate with sleep – and you can even buy dispensers that give off a calming lavender type smell. These won’t (of course) have any medical effect making you drowsy, but they really can make the bedroom smell very pleasant, and nothing wrong in that when you close your eyes at night.

5. Leverage the power of light

Our brains are actually programmed to sleep when we’re in darkness – hence presumably why as a species we tend to sleep at night (unless working shifts). So obviously it’s best to sleep in dark or near dark. But what about waking? Well, the opposite is true. Bright light aids alertness. So when the morning comes, if it’s dark outside and in the room, the sound of the alarm may be intrusive enough to make you groan. Using a dawn simulation clock can really help wake you up by degrees in much the same way as you would if sunlight started streaming in through the window.

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6. Embrace the Zen aspect of the Zzz

I used to sleep in a cluttered room. The floor was (I am embarrassed to admit) strewn with clothes. The surfaces crowded with books, empty soft drink cans, and all manner of random detritus. Then I read about de-cluttering. So I de-cluttered the room. The effect was so powerful that I could hardly believe it. The room felt calmer and it suddenly seemed to contain more space. What this made me realise is that an untidy room is like a three-dimensional to-do list – it’s a whole litany of things that need done. “Wash this garment.” “Put away this no longer required novel.” And so on. The reason you feel calmer in a tidy, ordered, Zen-like room is that it doesn’t require any action other than for you to enjoy being there.

7. Build your day around your night’s sleep

This may sound counterintuitive, as if day is somehow subservient to the night time hours. But this is not what I mean at all. If you look at all the healthy behaviours that we’re enjoined to include in our day, many of them are also very good sleep boosters. The following in particular are definitely a great help in preparing the path from wakefulness to sound sleep:

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Exercise. By getting the recommended amount of exercise you’re likely to have lower stress levels, and find that bedtime and good quality sleeping are synonymous.

Varied diet. By eating the right things (like plenty of fruit and vegetables) while avoiding the nasties (large amounts of processed, additive-loaded food) you will be less likely to spend the evening snacking and be more likely to feel calmer and happier of an evening.

No smoking, and low levels of alcohol consumption. Smoking is a no-no anyway. And those who have given up often remark on how much better they feel in the mornings. In terms of alcohol, it’s a well known fact that it impedes quality sleep. Swap that glass of wine for a cup of chamomile tea, put on some calm music, and feel the tension ease away.

Featured photo credit: peridotmaize via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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