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7 Effective Ways to Get Amazing Sleep

7 Effective Ways to Get Amazing Sleep

Life seems to get more and more hectic. Our days seem to be more and more packed with demands on our time. And the one area of life where we often feel we should improve (but seldom do) is that of sleep. Nobody is still quite sure of the optimum amount of sleep, or even if such a thing exists. But one thing is for certain – there’s nothing that beats feeling refreshed after a night’s rest. So what are the ways to get the best out of a night’s sleep? Let’s take a look at some of the most effective methods:

1. Sleep hygiene

The term “sleep hygiene” might sound like it refers (somehow) to either washing or staying clean during sleep. But actually it refers to the conditions that are most conducive towards good sleep. The single most important thing you can do when addressing quality of sleep is to look at not just the physical factors (e.g. light levels in the room) but also the non-physical ones such as sleep cycles and bedtimes. Think of sleep hygiene as the overarching strategy towards a better night’s sleep, with everything else mentioned in this list as a series of actions in support of it.

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2. Respect your internal clock

To an extent, nature made us all creatures of habit. This is why, when after crossing time zones, we’re prone to jet-lag. Our habitual waking and sleeping cycles suddenly go up against a clock that seems to have its hour hand perpetually in the wrong place. You can work with your internal clock to help aid restful sleep by nit going against it. Many of us are apt to do this – and I am as guilty as anyone. The most familiar scenario is the average Friday or Saturday night. After a long week at work, you find yourself staying up later. And getting up later the next morning. By the time Monday morning rolls around, what do we have?  Yes, an out-of-sync body clock. What works for me is to ensure getting up at the same time every day (regardless of what time I went to sleep).

3. Gear up the right habits for optimum sleep

Much of what you do in the evening will likely have an effect on your night’s sleep. So – this goes without saying, really – plates of rich food, vigorous exercise, caffeine – all of these are to be avoided during the time prior to going to bed.  Chances are that after a certain time in the evening you wouldn’t feel like eating rich food or firing up the espresso maker anyway. But it’s good to be aware of the things that can boost sleep, such as being in a quiet place, being hydrated and avoiding too much ‘blue light’ (e.g. from computer screens) before bed.

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4. Ritualize and make associations

It’s amazing what the power of ritual can do to help sleep. It may be down to the fact that if you carry out a series of actions every night (say, setting the alarm clock, filling the hot water bottle, reading a few pages of a favourite book) you are sending signals to the brain that bedtime is near. It’s almost as if the subconscious starts to prepare your body for the sleep ahead. Some people use a ‘sleep aroma’ that they associate with sleep – and you can even buy dispensers that give off a calming lavender type smell. These won’t (of course) have any medical effect making you drowsy, but they really can make the bedroom smell very pleasant, and nothing wrong in that when you close your eyes at night.

5. Leverage the power of light

Our brains are actually programmed to sleep when we’re in darkness – hence presumably why as a species we tend to sleep at night (unless working shifts). So obviously it’s best to sleep in dark or near dark. But what about waking? Well, the opposite is true. Bright light aids alertness. So when the morning comes, if it’s dark outside and in the room, the sound of the alarm may be intrusive enough to make you groan. Using a dawn simulation clock can really help wake you up by degrees in much the same way as you would if sunlight started streaming in through the window.

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6. Embrace the Zen aspect of the Zzz

I used to sleep in a cluttered room. The floor was (I am embarrassed to admit) strewn with clothes. The surfaces crowded with books, empty soft drink cans, and all manner of random detritus. Then I read about de-cluttering. So I de-cluttered the room. The effect was so powerful that I could hardly believe it. The room felt calmer and it suddenly seemed to contain more space. What this made me realise is that an untidy room is like a three-dimensional to-do list – it’s a whole litany of things that need done. “Wash this garment.” “Put away this no longer required novel.” And so on. The reason you feel calmer in a tidy, ordered, Zen-like room is that it doesn’t require any action other than for you to enjoy being there.

7. Build your day around your night’s sleep

This may sound counterintuitive, as if day is somehow subservient to the night time hours. But this is not what I mean at all. If you look at all the healthy behaviours that we’re enjoined to include in our day, many of them are also very good sleep boosters. The following in particular are definitely a great help in preparing the path from wakefulness to sound sleep:

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Exercise. By getting the recommended amount of exercise you’re likely to have lower stress levels, and find that bedtime and good quality sleeping are synonymous.

Varied diet. By eating the right things (like plenty of fruit and vegetables) while avoiding the nasties (large amounts of processed, additive-loaded food) you will be less likely to spend the evening snacking and be more likely to feel calmer and happier of an evening.

No smoking, and low levels of alcohol consumption. Smoking is a no-no anyway. And those who have given up often remark on how much better they feel in the mornings. In terms of alcohol, it’s a well known fact that it impedes quality sleep. Swap that glass of wine for a cup of chamomile tea, put on some calm music, and feel the tension ease away.

Featured photo credit: peridotmaize via pixabay.com

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Sarah Anton

Editor and founder of The Fitrepreneur, aspires to improve people's living style.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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