Advertising
Advertising

4 Reasons Swimming is Sensational for Your Kids

4 Reasons Swimming is Sensational for Your Kids

We’ve all been at that pool party where our one friend won’t leave the steps of the shallow end. Mortified and chagrined, that lonesome kid always has some kind of story why he or she doesn’t know how to swim. So instead of having your kids become the one who won’t leave the steps, consider why teaching them to swim is more helpful than just learning how not to drown.

Swimming Builds Self-Esteem

The article Developing Self-Esteem, published by the Seattle Children’s Hospital, March 2012,  Michelle New, Phd, expresses the wisdom in developing self-esteem early.

“It’s wise to think about developing and promoting self-esteem during childhood. As kids try, fail, try again, fail again, and then finally succeed, they develop ideas about their own capabilities. At the same time, they’re creating a self-concept based on interactions with other people. This is why parental involvement is key to helping kids form accurate, healthy self-perceptions,”

Red Cross Water Safety Instructor, Colleen Hammon — who has taught many children in her 30 years of instruction — also feels swimming is a great for self-esteem.

Advertising

“When the children learn that they can swim and float by themselves, they develop great pride and a wonderful feeling of accomplishment,” Hammon says. “As their skills improve, their successes also improve providing more feelings of self worth. There is something very special in bringing a child from ‘I can’t’ to ‘I did it!'”

Swimming Teaches Sportsmanship

USA Swimming states “swimming teaches the life lessons of sport and sportsmanship which include learning to deal with winning and losing, as well as working with officials, teammates and coaches.”

The idea of participating in sports is not for everyone to receive a feel-good-trophy, but for children to create positive attitudes and experiences for themselves and everyone around them. This concept is so important in life and athletics, the Nemours Foundation for Kids Health has dedicated many publications to the topic.

Hammon, who has attended many swim meets in her tenure, says, “If you have ever been to a swim meet, you see the swimmers cheering each other on to do their best. There is a sense of pride for the team even if you are not the winner of a race.”

Advertising

Swimming Helps to Conduce Coordination

It is commonly known kids who lack coordination have a difficult time with basic skills such as catching balls, riding bikes, writing letters and learning to read.

In some cases, children may have Developmental Coordination Disorder.

“Development Coordination Disorder is diagnosed when children do not develop normal motor coordination (coordination of movements involving the voluntary muscles),” according to the Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders. “The disorder can, however, lead to social or academic problems for children. Because of their underdeveloped coordination, they may choose not to participate in activities on the playground. This avoidance can lead to conflicts with or rejection by their peers. Also, children who have problems forming letters when they write by hand, or drawing pictures, may become discouraged and give up      academic or artistic pursuits even though they have normal intelligence.”

There is no one set therapy to help children who lack coordination, but sports such as swimming can help.

Advertising

“Swimming requires a lot of coordination,” Hammons says. “The arms are doing one motion while the legs do another. Coordinating the breathing with the arms and body motion is an important part of the whole stroke. Even moving the arms at a speed different from the legs requires a great amount of coordination.”

Aqua therapies — such as swimming — have been used to enhance the lives of children with autism, wounded warriors, and those with balance coordination disorders.

Swimming Promotes Socialization

“When children become swimmers, it opens a whole new playground for them, ” Hammon says. “They can play freely in the pool with their friends without having to be afraid of the water. I love seeing their joy when they are just having a great time in the water — diving down for toys, jumping from the side of the pool into the water, racing each other, or just clowning around.”

The friendships made during childhood years can have the ability to grow into life long, loving relationships if we teach our children how to interact with each other appropriately and respectfully.

Advertising

“In a few years, the medals and ribbons will be laid aside and best times will be a hazy memory. The friendships that will develop and the life skills learned will carry on for a lifetime,” USA Swimming.

Swimming not only provides kids with life skills which help to achieve success, but it also provides them with the ability to make a pool or ocean into a playground.

“My greatest joy is being able to take a child who is fearful of the water and turning them into swimmers who can enjoy the water where ever they are,” Hammon says.

To find out more about swimming check out USA Swimming.

Featured photo credit: Kid Swimming/Marin Resnick via flickr.com

More by this author

10 Best Marketing Books Of 2014 5 Fantastic Spiritual Sayings From 5 Successful Everyday People 20 Amazing Life Lessons Nature Has Taught Us 10 Ways to Work Meditation Into Your Day 35 Amazing Picture Books For Adults That Will Warm Your Heart

Trending in Lifestyle

1 How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck 2 How to Find Weight Loss Meal Plans That Work for You 3 14 Healthy Easy Recipes for People on the Go 4 How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries 5 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next