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20 Signs You’re A Creative Person

20 Signs You’re A Creative Person

The world would be a dreadful place without creative people. Could you even imagine life without art? The thought alone makes me tremble. Could you be the next William Shakespeare, Steven Spielberg, or J.K. Rowling? Find out with these 20 signs you’re a creative person.

1. You have an authority problem.

Creative types don’t always get along well with management because they would rather march to the beat of their own drum.

2. You have a hard time relating with people.

Most people have a strong desire to fit in, something that you don’t understand. Conformity is gross.

3. You like to solve problems.

While most people are running and hiding from problems, you purposely seek them because you love nothing more than a fresh new challenge.

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4. You are your own worst critic.

You wrote a blog many months ago and thought it was wonderful at the time you published it. But then you read it again later and wonder, “What the hell was I thinking?” You then identify approximately a thousand ways it could have been better and kick yourself for being so stupid.

Note: Coincidentally, this is why I REFUSE to read my own old blogs and articles. 

5. You ask lots of questions.

A stagnant mind devoid of curiosity doesn’t have the capacity to create.

6. You carry a notebook everywhere you go.

Because how else can you remember all those brilliant ideas that strike you on the fly?

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7. You find beauty in the ordinary.

Creatives live in the present and are in constant awe of the world around them.

8. You are numb to rejection.

Let’s face it: it’s a hard world out there. If becoming a writer or actor or artist was easy, a lot more people would do it. Getting that dreaded rejection letter stinks at first, but eventually you become able to just shrug it off and go on to the next one. 

9. You understand the power of atmosphere.

There is a reason some authors travel to a rustic cabin or sandy beach to write their novels. Some atmospheres are more conducive to creativity than others. Maybe you like to pack up your laptop and go to a coffee shop, downtown bench, or under a tree at the park. Whatever the case may be, you know the locations that boost your creative juices.

10. You think most people have poor taste.

You might find the movies and music most people enjoy to be downright terrible. I don’t know about you, but I believe a kitten dies every time someone listens to Nickelback.

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11. You are a people-watcher.

Why do people watch TV when real life is infinitely more interesting?

12. You aren’t in it for the money.

Money pays bills but it doesn’t provide happiness. There are much easier ways to make a living. This isn’t about money, it’s about passion.

13. You experience emotional highs and lows.

Your emotional life is not a straight line. Instead, it is more like the path of a roller-coaster full of dips, drops, hills, loops, and twists. Sometimes you might experience an eruption of happiness and a crash to sadness within mere moments of each other. The most painful parts usually find themselves in your art.

14. You seek inspiration.

Inspiration doesn’t happen on its own. Whether it is the opening of an art gallery, a theatrical production, or live music at a downtown bar, you search for inspiration wherever you can find it. It’s nice to know you’re not alone in your desire to create.

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15. You have an interesting sense of humor.

Off-color jokes are the best kind of jokes.

16. You evolve like a boss.

An ability to adapt to challenging scenarios is necessary for survival in the creative jungle.

17. You hate stereotypes.

You understand that human beings are way too complicated to be dumped into gender roles or stereotypes.

18. You don’t have a filter.

Don’t you think life would be much more fun if everyone just said what they were thinking with no filter? There is no such thing as TMI (Too Much Information). 

19. You take time to think.

Your brain is your greatest asset.

20. You don’t bend to pressure.

Whether it’s a hater who thinks your work of art sucks, a family member who thinks “you should get a real job,” or a friend who thinks your idea “will never work,” you don’t cave to outside pressure.

Are you a creative person? Did you find yourself in this list? If so, please feel free to say hello in the comments.

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Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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