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10 Simple Rules For Good Writing

10 Simple Rules For Good Writing

Have you ever stopped and thought about the quality of your writing? Are you sure it’s considered to be good writing? Are you getting the right message across, or are your readers confused as to what you’re trying to accomplish?

Worry no more, dear writer. We have just the solution for you! Whether you’re writing fiction or non-fiction, the rules for good writing are fundamentally the same.

1. Express, not impress.

Good writing is not about the number of words you’ve produced, the quality of the adjectives you’ve written or the size of your font–it’s about the number of lives you’ve touched! It’s whether or not your reader understands you. It’s about expression, not impression.

2. Simple sentences work best.

– The only possible option in order to accelerate the growth of the food industry is to focus on the fact that the target market of this business demands convenience, competence and cost-effectiveness.

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– Better: The food industry can grow faster if food trucks focus on convenience, competence and cost-effectiveness.

3. Active, rather than passive.

– The offering price was established by the real estate vendor and the negotiation process was initiated by the real estate buyer.

– Better: The real estate vendor set the offering price, and the real estate buyer started negotiating.

4. Know who your target audience is.

Who are you writing for? Who do you expect to read your article, your book, or your blog post? Will they care about what you’re talking about? Will they understand the message that you’re trying to get across? Good writing isn’t generic; it’s specific because it’s targeted towards a group of people with something common binding them.

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5. Read it aloud.

Reading your works out loud allows you to notice something that you might not have noticed if you were just reading it silently. Go on, read them out loud now. Also, try to listen to your work objectively as you read it. Are you making sense? Or are you simply stringing a couple of words together just to fill a gap?

6. Avoid using jargon as much as possible.

Not everyone in your audience will know what a “bull market” is. Not everyone knows that “pyrexia” is basically the same thing as “a fever”. And surely you can come up with a better term for high blood pressure than “hypertension”?

7. In terms of words, size matters.

Please, don’t strain yourself by browsing the Internet, looking for complicated and fancy-sounding words. Less is always more.

– The man gave a me look so sharp that I sincerely believed it could pierce my heart and see my innermost fears.

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– Better: The man glared at me.

8. Being positive is better than being negative–even in writing!

– I did not think that the unbelievable would not occur.

– Better: I thought the unbelievable would happen.

9. Set aside time for revising and rewriting–after you’ve written the whole content.

I’m not suggesting that you should edit each time you’ve finished a paragraph–that would just be tedious. What I’m telling is that you should first give yourself some time to finish the content prior to editing. Write away. Don’t edit yet. Don’t focus on the grammar yet. Don’t worry about the syntax, the synonym, the antonym or the order that you’re using.

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Write for yourself, but mostly, write for your target audience. Write the message clearly and don’t be afraid to express your thoughts. Don’t censor yourself yet. Let the words flow. Don’t erase what you’ve written yet.

Right now, it’s all about expression, about art and about your imagination.

All the editing and the fixing will come later.

10. Write. All the time.

Good writing is simply always writing. Write when you’re sad. Write when you’re scared. Write when you don’t feel like writing.

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More by this author

Lianne Martha Maiquez Laroya

Lianne is a licensed financial advisor, Registered Financial Planner, entrepreneur and book author.

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Published on May 28, 2021

10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively

10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively

Perhaps one of the hardest things a 4-year-old kid can learn is to tie his shoes. On the contrary, for adults like us, it’s the simplest and probably the most boring activity we can think of. I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t want to register for a seminar on how to lace shoes, right!

It’s obvious, you don’t even need to use your brain when tying shoelaces. Look back up, I said most b-o-r-i-n-g a while ago when I mentioned lacing shoes up. But I will take that back. Why? Because when I saw the post from Diply featuring videos of lacing up shoes artistically, I realize how intricate, complicated, and creative it is to lace up shoes. That is if you do it like the way we do it on the featured videos.

1. Lattice

2. Hidden Knot

3. Ladder

4. Display

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYAOnCxO8To

5. Loop Back

6. Checkerboard

7. Double Back

8. Zipper

9. Sawtooth

10. Riding Bow

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