Advertising
Advertising

7 Reasons You Haven’t Found Your Passion Yet

7 Reasons You Haven’t Found Your Passion Yet

Find Your Passion

    There is no clear formula for finding your passion. Some people seem to know it from the time they are born. Others seem to search for it until they die.

    One thing is clear: we all would love to spend our days doing what we love. But if you don’t quite know what direction you should head, what do you do?

    In many cases, the reason you haven’t found your true calling yet is because you’re focusing on the wrong things. With that in mind, here are 7 reasons that you haven’t found your passion yet — and what to do about it.

    1. All you think about is finding your passion.

    Once you start looking for what you were meant to do, it’s easy to get caught up in the search. Unfortunately, continually asking yourself “What am I passionate about?” usually has very little benefit.

    You can’t find your passion by searching the depths of your mind. Passions come from actions and experiences — not idle contemplation.

    Advertising

    2. You’re searching for feeling before experience.

    Passions evolve out of experiences. If you’re looking to feel passionate about something before doing it, then you’re going to be looking for a long time.

    Would you expect yourself to fall in love with an artist before ever hearing their music? Of course not. How can you be passionate about woodcarving if you’ve never done it? Or at the very least seen someone do it.

    The feeling of passion will come after you’ve had an experience, not before.

    3. You’re staying the course.

    There is nothing wrong with pursuing a long-term goal or walking the same path for awhile. But don’t let your ultimate goal blind you from the opportunities that arise along the way. Some of the most compelling options might start out as side jobs, hobbies, or a random meeting.

    Instead of becoming obsessively focused on one area, take advantage of the new opportunities that arise from time to time.

    4. You’re looking for direction and clarity.

    We often think that if we find our passion, then we will have clarity and know what to do with our lives.

    Advertising

    If only it were that simple. Life is a series of confusing situations and you’ll never have all of the answers. Regardless of the situation, we have to make the best choice at the time and continue to move forward.

    Finding your passion isn’t about know the right direction from the outset. It’s about choosing a direction, paying attention to what interests you along the way, and pursuing those interesting areas further.

    5. You’re not creating something.

    A common difference between those who are living their passion and those who are still searching for it, is that the former group has created something. Maybe that’s art for someone else. Maybe that’s a job for themselves. Maybe that a program for the community. Maybe that’s an opportunity for their career.

    The act of creating is important because it allows us to discover things about ourselves.

    It is only through the act of pushing ourselves and creating something new that we discover what is important to us, what we’re good at, and what we are willing to sacrifice for.

    No, it’s not easy to create something, but it is important to do so.

    Advertising

    6. You’re looking to live your life all at once instead of moment-by-moment.

    Searching for our passion is part of a larger goal — we want to know what to do with our lives. We want to know how to spend our time on this planet.

    The problem, of course, is that examining our lives from such a high level often prevents us from focusing on this moment.

    Discovering your passion happens in a series of small steps. You first hear about it in a book or from a friend. Then you go to a class or an event. Then you try it out yourself. Then you try it again. Then it becomes a hobby. Then you’re telling your friends about it. And before you know it, you’ve found your calling in life.

    But it didn’t happen overnight.

    Instead of worrying about what you’re going to do with the rest of your life, spend some time thinking about what you should do with the rest of today. How can you do something enjoyable in this moment?

    String enough enjoyable moments together and you’re bound to be passionate about one of them.

    Advertising

    7. You haven’t dedicated yourself to a goal.

    We all have interests, but we usually keep them as passing interests that we come back to from time to time. Rarely do we take an interest and decide to pursue a specific goal related to it.

    Reaching for a goal is important because it starts a process that brings about opportunities that we cannot predict. If you endeavor to reach a meaningful goal, then there will undoubtedly be opportunities that arise along the way that you would never have imagined when you started.

    Whether or not you reach your original goal isn’t nearly as important as the journey it takes you on and the opportunities that journey offers.

    Pursue your interests with purpose and you’ll find that your passion has a funny way of showing up.

    For more on how experiences can reveal your passion, read this article on finding your passion.

    More by this author

    James Clear

    James Clear is the author of Atomic Habits. He shares self-improvement tips based on proven scientific research.

    7 Helpful Reminders When You Want to Make Big Life Changes 7 Reasons You Haven’t Found Your Passion Yet Fast Growth Is Overrated — Here’s Why Famous Biologist Louis Agassiz On The Usefulness Of Learning Through Observation How to Fall in Love With Boredom and Unlock Your Mental Toughness

    Trending in Lifehack

    1 How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them 2 20 Time Management Tips to Super Boost Your Productivity 3 Forget Learning How to Multitask to 10X Your Productivity 4 The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness 5 What Everyone Is Wrong About Achieving Inbox Zero

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on August 12, 2020

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

    Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

    Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

    Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

    Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

    1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

    Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

    Advertising

    So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

    Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

    If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

    2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

    This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

    Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

    Advertising

    3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

    Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

    For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

    4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

    Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

    These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

    5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

    Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

    Advertising

    For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

    Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

    6. Schedule Your To-Dos

    Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

    Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

    7. Use Your Reticular Activating System to Get Your Goal

    Learn in this Lifehack’s vlog how you can hack your brain with the Reticular Activation System (RAS) and reach your goal more efficiently:

    Advertising

    8. Review Your Progress

    At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

    Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

    More Tips for Achieving Goals

    Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

    Read Next