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12 Ways To Solve A Crisis

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12 Ways To Solve A Crisis

    Crisis, chaos, havoc, unleashed hell. I know you’ve been through this at least once in your lifetime. Going through such an experience is painful. But, as a person who probably hit considerably more crisis than the average, I know there is something even worse then going through a crisis. And that’s not learning something from it.

    We’re still under the effects of one of the worst economical crisis in the history of the world and many of us are still feeling the effects. Maybe you lost your job or maybe your personal partnership faded away. Whatever the case, we’re swimming on an agitated ocean. Another crisis, being it profession or personal, may hit any time.

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    Without further ado, here’s a list of possible approaches to help you raise again after you got hit by the hurricane.

    1. Accept It

    You can/t control something if you’re not accepting it. You simply don’t have handles for it. Denial is one of the most common answers to crisis and, unfortunately, one of the most toxic. As simple and dumb as it may seem, just accepting that you’re going through a crisis will clear a lot of the fog around. Just accept that things didn’t go like planned and see how you can move on.

    2. Browse Through Similar Crisis In Your Experience

    Believe it or not, we’re doing the same mistakes over and over again. We may change some of the actors and circumstances, but, generally speaking, we’re repetitive in our mistakes. So, the first thing to do when hitting a crisis is to look back in your own history: have you been there before? Why? What did you do to escape it? How is the current crisis different form the last similar one?

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    3. Browse Through Similar Crisis In Other People Experiences

    But since we’re creative individuals, we can also make new mistakes. In that case, your personal experience may not help. Luckily, chances that other people have been exposed to the same disaster that you’re going through right now are really high. So, try to find out how other people dealed with that. Read on, listen, ask questions, be curious. It will help.

    4. Step Away From It

    It’s not like running away, but more like trying to understand what you’re going through in a different way. A new “thinking hat” or the famous thinking “outside of the box”. It’s not always possible, but having this option somewhere in your bag can help. Just try to say to yourself something like “It’s obvious that my current thinking brought me here, let’s just try something else”.

    5. Ask For Help

    Reach out. Ask. Be open and honest about your situation. You’ll be surprised how many reliable persons are out there, just waiting to be pitched. Many times our crisis are erupting exactly because we try to do too much on our own, without interacting with other people. We’re social animals and not asking for help goes against our nature. Forget pride. During crisis, pride is the first thing you should throw away.

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    6. Buy More Time

    One of the most painful things during a crisis is the pressure. We have to do things (or respond to various stimuli) very fast. A strategy that seemed to work for me was to try to buy some time. Postpone responses for as long as you can. The crisis time window is usually very narrow. Eventually, things will be back on track, one way or another.

    7. Negotiate

    Nothing is set in stone. Yes, you may have lost something (your job, your house, your relationship) but that doesn’t mean you can’t react to that. Always negotiate. You have this right and you should use it. If your culture banishes negotiation for being “ungentlemanly’ just look around and evaluate. Is your crisis a ”gentlemanly“ situation? I thought so…

    8. Alleviate The Effects As Fast As Possible

    The worst thing you can do when an arsonist is putting your house on fire is to chase the guy and leave your house burning. That’s a buddhist proverb, by the way. Subsequently, during a crisis you should always try to minimize the damage as fast as you can, in order to keep yourself functional. Trying to eliminate the cause of the crisis while you’re still under its effects is useless.

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    9. Cut The Ropes

    Or just throw away anything that is useless. During a crisis, it’s vital that you move fast. Being slim takes a new meaning. Responding fast to stimulus, moving on with lightening speed may make the difference between death and survival. More often than not, crisis are arising specifically because we get too attached to habits, contexts or persons who are no longer good for us.

    10. Secure Vital Resources

    This may seem strange and passive, but many times, at the end of a personal crisis, I realized that winning or losing was merely a question of how many vital resources I had. Rationalize food, for instance, if you’re lost in the woods. Stop spending money foolishly, if you’re fired. Whatever it takes so that your resources will not dry faster than you need them.

    11. Write A Worse Case Scenario

    By far my favorite approach. Just take a sheet of paper and write down everything that may go wrong. And I mean everything. Write the worst that may happen to you. If you do this the right way, being totally honest, that is, something incredible will happen: your panic will dissolve. We fear the unknown more than anything else. If you know what to expect, everything will look manageable again.

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    12. Surrender To It

    Not the easiest option, but, sometimes, the only one we really have. Sometimes, crisis are entering our lives because we need to grow, we need to leave the old behind and embrace the new. We’re designed to evolve and improve but, somehow, we decided not to. At this moment, the only way we can become more than we are right now, is to go through a crisis. Surrender to it and go with the flow.

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

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    Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

    With all of the recent online services and companies falling under attack to hackers in the past few months, it seems only fitting to talk about password creation and management. There are a lot of resources out there discussing this, but it never hurts to revisit this topic time and again because of its importance.

    Password management isn’t necessarily a difficult thing to do, yet it does seem like a bit of an annoyance to most people. When it comes to password management, you will hear the famous line, “I don’t really care about changing my passwords regularly. I have nothing important online anyways.” Let’s see if you have nothing important online when your PayPal account gets taken over because you thought the password “password” was good enough.

    In my opinion, it is an “internet user’s” responsibility to make sure that they keep secure passwords and update them on a regular basis. In this article we will discuss how to make your online presence more secure and keep it secure.

    The easy fundamentals

    First thing is first; creating a strong password.

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    A strong password is a mixture of alpha-numeric characters and symbols, has a good length (hopefully 15 characters or longer), and doesn’t necessarily represent some word or phrase. If the service you are signing up for doesn’t allow passwords over a certain length, like 8 characters, always use the maximum length.

    Here are some examples of strong passwords:
    * i1?,2,2\1′(:-%Y
    * ZQ5t0466VC44PmJ
    * mp]K{ dCFKVplGe]PBm1mKdinLSOoa (30 characters)

    And not so good examples
    * sammy1234
    * password123
    * christopher

    You can check out PC Tools Password Generator here. This is a great way to make up some very strong passwords. Of course the more random passwords are harder to remember, but that is where password management comes into play.

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    Managing your passwords

    I know some people that keep their passwords in an unencrypted text file. That’s not a good idea. I suppose that if you aren’t doing much online and are decent at avoiding viruses and such, it could be OK, but I would never recommend it.

    So, where do you keep your strong passwords for all the services that you visit on a daily basis?

    There are a ton of password safes out there including KeePass, RoboForm, Passpack, Password Safe, LastPass, and 1Password. If and when I recommend any of these I always count on LastPass and 1Password.

    Both LastPass and 1Password offer different entry types for online services logins (PayPal, Twitter, Facebook, Gmail, etc.), credit cards and bank accounts, online identities, and other types of sensitive information. Both have excellent reviews and only differ in a few subtle ways. One of the ways that is more notable is that LastPass keeps your encrypted password Vault online where 1Password allows you to keep it locally or shared through Dropbox. Either way, you are the holder of the encryption keys and both ways are very secure.

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    LastPass and 1Password both offer cross-platform support as well as support for Android and iOS (LastPass even has BlackBerry support). 1Password is a little pricey ($39.99 for either Windows or Mac) where LastPass has free options as well as premium upgrades that allow for mobile syncing.

    Upkeep

    You should probably change your passwords for your “important” accounts at least every 6 weeks. When I say “important” accounts I am referring to ones that you just couldn’t imagine losing access to. For me that would be Gmail, PayPal, eBay, Amazon, all my FTP accounts and hosting accounts, Namecheap, etc. Basically these include any account where financial information could be lost or accessed as well as accounts that could be totally screwed up (like my webserver).

    There is no hard and fast rule to how often you should change your passwords, but 6 to 8 weeks should be pretty good.

    Alternatives

    You may think that all of this is just too much to manage on a daily basis. I will admit it is kind of annoying to have to change your passwords and use a password manager on a daily basis. For those people out there that don’t want to go through all of the hub-bub of super-secure, encrypted, password management, here are a few tips to keep you safe:

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    1. Create a unique and hard to guess “base password” and then a pattern to use for each site you logon onto. For instance a base password could be “Ih2BaSwAa” (this stands for “I have two brothers and sisters who are annoying”). Then you would add something “site specific” to the end of it. For Twitter Ih2BaSwAaTWTTR, Facebook Ih2BaSwAaFCBK, etc. This is sort of unsecure, but probably more secure than 99% of the passwords out there.
    2. Don’t write your passwords down in public places. If you want to keep track of passwords on something written, keep it on you at least. The problem is that if you get your wallet stolen you are still out of luck.
    3. Don’t use the same passwords for every service. I’m not even going to explain this; just don’t do it.

    These are just a few things that can be done rather than keeping your passwords in a management system. Personally, with over 100 entries in my password management system, I couldn’t even dream of doing any other way. But those out there with only a few passwords, having a simpler system may be beneficial.

    So, if you want to be a “responsible internet citizen” or you just don’t want to lose your precious account data, then creating and maintaining strong passwords for your online accounts is a must.

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