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Why Traveling Will Literally Change Your Life

Why Traveling Will Literally Change Your Life

There are few things as rewarding as traveling. It’s one of the most exciting things you can do, and it’s also something that you will remember for the rest of your life. I recently had the opportunity to live in London for four months while studying. I was lucky enough to visit several other countries while abroad, and it was one of the most enriching experiences I’ve ever had.

While it’s not always practical to pack up and leave for extended periods of time, there are a lot of opportunities to travel both domestically and overseas. Traveling is easier than ever. With the right planning, it can be done on even the tightest of budgets, and the payoff is definitely worth the investment. Here are the top 10 reasons why you should make traveling a priority.

1. It’s refreshing.

The number one reason traveling is so great? Your travel destination is not wherever you usually sleep, eat, work, and play. It’s a whole new place with endless sights and activities for you to explore. It’s really easy for life at home to get stale, so try to get out there and see more of the world. Or at least the next few towns over.

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2. It’s easy.

Okay, so it’s not always a cakewalk, but travel is becoming much simpler. Of course, I will always recommend doing a fair bit of planning just to make sure everything goes off without a hitch. Keep your travel documents together, make sure all your reservations are made and confirmed, make sure you know how to at least get to your lodging from the airport/bus station/train station/side of the road. With a few little details like this covered, though, it’s really quite easy to get going.

3. You’ll learn new things.

About yourself, about other peoples, about other foods, about the world you live in. Traveling is possibly the most fun anyone can have while learning. It’s fascinating to learn about the world outside of your small community, so embrace the option to do so.

4. It’s customizable.

As long as you’re traveling without a structured group or guide, you’re totally in control of what you do with your time. How great is it to be able to do whatever you want to do? Traveling gives you a great excuse to let loose and explore your interests.

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5. You’ll meet new people.

Traveling is a great way to meet new friends. If you’re the backpacking type, it’s often very easy to find groups of people who are heading the same way as you. Hostels, for those who are budget-conscious, are also good way to meet new people, as many travelers there are traveling alone or in very small groups. There are tons of opportunities to meet both fellow travelers and locals.

6. You’ll gain skills.

Learning new skills can be any of a number of things. It could be that you learn parts of a new language or how to tie the perfect sailor’s knot. Or maybe you gain the skill of time management simply by planning your day. A great aspect of traveling is that you often gain new skills without thinking about it as work, or even without knowing it at all.

7. It gives you something to look forward to.

Sometimes, it’s really nice to have something on your calendar to look forward to. Just a little reminder that in two weeks’ time, you’re going to be on a plane to an exciting new country or road tripping to the West coast. That anticipation and excitement is almost as nice as the trip itself.

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8. And something to look back on fondly.

Pictures, memories, memorabilia, whatever you want to remember your trip by. Traveling is great because even when the trip is over, you get to relive every moment of it again in your mind.

9. You’ll experience new things.

Traveling is a great way to experiment with new things. Whether that’s zip lining, rafting, getting pampered, or just relaxing on a far away beach, you’ll get to try things for the first time.

10. It’ll make you a better person.

Going to new places is a great way to round yourself out. Well-traveled people are more interesting, more knowledgable, and, often, more fun. Surround yourself with others who share your passion for travel and your interest in becoming a global citizen. You’ll find yourself changing for the better as a result.

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Featured photo credit: Ho John Lee via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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