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What Life Is Actually About: A Refreshingly New Perspective

What Life Is Actually About: A Refreshingly New Perspective

Painful memories can make us strong, teach patience, and cause us to appreciate more enjoyable, easier moments. Sure, our complete memories make us who we are but that does not mean we can’t choose an increased well being.

Various Perspectives

Traveling around the world, you uncover many ways different cultures and individuals justify the meaning of life, their individual experiences, and their personal lifestyles. Sure we’re all familiar with the notion of karma or reincarnation, but what about more obscure beliefs? For example, Pharrell William’s of N.E.R.D. fame supports his and fellow band mate’s beliefs on life by equating Eintstein’s theory that “energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only be changed from one form to another” to the band’s eponymous acronym: “No One Ever Really Dies.”

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A New Take

Another particular lifestyle that is so organic and is the practical notion to live by is the idea of life being about collecting memories. Particularly within this lifetime, these memories are to be gathered and recalled at any time. For feelings of contentedness, the aim is to collect as many good memories as possible.

The Aim

Various emotions are often tied to our different memories and recalling happier times often leads to a better well being. Reminiscent of the premise of many video games, imagine life as an aim to collect more positive experiences to recall, which can result in more life satisfaction. Learn to duck when needed and always look for bonus points.

What about Negative Memories?

Many of us have had sleepless nights regularly recalling feelings of hopelessness, shame, anger, fear and many other worrying emotions. Theories suggest that these type of feelings are better preserved than happier or neutral memories – possibly as a way to remind ourselves not to relive such a situation, similar to how we learned that fire was hot when we were young. It is important to note that we also have a higher risk for not properly recalling an incident.

In addition, scientists have discovered that anger, anxiety, and depression affect the functioning of the heart as well as increase the risk for heart disease. Atherosclerosis is a process where blood vessels supply the heart and brain, and strokes and heart attacks are caused by progressive damage to these vessels. Atherosclerosis increases when there are high levels pro-inflammatory cytokines or chemicals in the body.

A new way to deal with negative memories has been suggested by researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, led by psychology professor Florin Dolcos of the Cognitive Neuroscience Group. Their studies claim that once a negative memory enters your mind, we should recall the event holistically, which allows us to remember not only the bad, but the positives that occurred, too.

Recalling some positives surrounding our bad memories allows us to gain a more well rounded perspective on the matter. Negative memories can continue to serve as reminders as to how better to collect good memories.

Collect Good Memories

While memories that we often try to avoid can teach lessons about future choices and make good memories much better by comparison, learning to focus on our positive memories can lead to increased self confidence and self-fulfilment. If you find yourself focusing on the negatives, studies recently found that recalling something more holistically can help gain a better, general perspective on our lives. Try to aim to collect one good experience, conversation, or accomplishment per day. This might include reading something you would not normally read, extending yourself at work, school or for volunteer work, or savoring something including a tasty treat or fun event. Aim to learn and to connect good experiences with certain places. Surround yourself only with people you admire for one reason or another. As for the inevitable negative people, use those memories to learn from. Like Gaven deBecker states in his book, “the Gift of Fear, know yourself well enough to trust your instincts.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

What do I want to do with my life? It’s a question all of us think about at one point or another.

For some, the answer comes easily. For others, it takes a lifetime to figure out.

It’s easy to just go through the motions and continue to do what’s comfortable and familiar. But for those of you who seek fulfillment, who want to do more, these questions will help you paint a clearer picture of what you want to do with your life.

1. What are the things I’m most passionate about?

The first step to living a more fulfilling life is to think about the things that you’re passionate about.

What do you love? What fulfills you? What “work” do you do that doesn’t feel like work? Maybe you enjoy writing, maybe you love working with animals or maybe you have a knack for photography.

The point is, figure out what you love doing, then do more of it.

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2. What are my greatest accomplishments in life so far?

Think about your past experiences and the things in your life you’re most proud of.

How did those accomplishments make you feel? Pretty darn good, right? So why not try and emulate those experiences and feelings?

If you ran a marathon once and loved the feeling you had afterwards, start training for another one. If your child grew up to be a star athlete or musician because of your teachings, then be a coach or mentor for other kids.

Continue to do the things that have been most fulfilling for you.

3. If my life had absolutely no limits, what would I choose to have and what would I choose to do?

Here’s a cool exercise: Think about what you would do if you had no limits.

If you had all the money and time in the world, where would you go? What would you do? Who would you spend time with?

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These answers can help you figure out what you want to do with your life. It doesn’t mean you need millions of dollars to be happy though.

What it does mean is answering these questions will help you set goals to reach certain milestones and create a path toward happiness and fulfillment. Which leads to our next question …

4. What are my goals in life?

Goals are a necessary component to set you up for a happy future. So answer these questions:

Once you figure out the answers to each of these, you’ll have a much better idea of what you should do with your life.

5. Whom do I admire most in the world?

Following the path of successful people can set you up for success.

Think about the people you respect and admire most. What are their best qualities? Why do you respect them? What can you learn from them?

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You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.[1] So don’t waste your time with people who hold you back from achieving your dreams.

Spend more time with happy, successful, optimistic people and you’ll become one of them.

6. What do I not like to do?

An important part of figuring out what you want to do with your life is honestly assessing what you don’t want to do.

What are the things you despise? What bugs you the most about your current job?

Maybe you hate meetings even though you sit through 6 hours of them every day. If that’s the case, find a job where you can work more independently.

The point is, if you want something to change in your life, you need to take action. Which leads to our final question …

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7. How hard am I willing to work to get what I want?

Great accomplishments never come easy. If you want to do great things with your life, you’re going to have to make a great effort. That will probably mean putting in more hours the average person, getting outside your comfort zone and learning as much as you can to achieve as much as you can.

But here’s the cool part: it’s often the journey that is the most fulfilling part. It’s during these seemingly small, insignificant moments that you’ll often find that “aha” moments that helps you answer the question,

“What do I want to do with my life?”

So take the first step toward improving your life. You won’t regret it.

Featured photo credit: Andrew Ly via unsplash.com

Reference

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