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Valuable Lessons Disney Movies Can Teach Adults

Valuable Lessons Disney Movies Can Teach Adults

Disney movies are great for keeping the kids entertained so you can get things done. However, the lessons these movies teach don’t just apply to children. Even though they’re cartoons, these classic Disney films impart life lessons even adults can learn from.

1. Tangled

Disney Tangled Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

    …so does…all your hair glow like this? …even down there?

    An overbearing mother grounds her daughter for life. As oppressed girls do when they come of age, the young girl goes wild and falls for the first man she meets. Soon, the girl teams with the older man to rebel against her mother. They live happily ever after until the girl realizes she’s just like her mother.

    Lesson:The more you oppress a person, the more likely they are to do exactly what you don’t want them to.

    2. Alice in Wonderland

    Disney Alice in Wonderland Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

      Watch your drinks, ladies…

      Bored with her day-to-day life of privilege, young Alice begins taking drugs and chasing the white rabbit through Pan’s labyrinth. She travels to a small village in the Amazon where she drinks peyote tea and confronts her mommy issues. Like a typical American travelling overseas, Alice runs amok, eventually drawing the ire of local law enforcement. After inciting a riot, Alice is deported back home, where she now speaks with a pretentiously fake British accent, to the chagrin of friends and family.

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      Lesson: Sometimes you have to just take a chance and travel down the rabbit hole.

      3. Meet the Robinsons

      Disney Meet the Robinsons Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

        Portrait of an American Family…

        Two orphans take very different paths in life–one follows his dreams, while the other envies him for it. Years later, the envious orphan gives up on competing with his adult rival, and instead battles his son. Still a loser, he gets in touch with his inner child, which is the only child you’re allowed to touch in questionable ways.

        Lesson: Jealously looks good on no one.

        4. The Nightmare Before Christmas

        Disney Nightmare Before Christmas Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

          Next we’ll combine Valentine’s and St. Patrick’s Day…

          Everyone’s celebrating Halloween, but Jack yearns for Christmas. Jack decides to begin selling Christmas decorations before Halloween. Jack’s decision wreaks havoc on all holidays and towns in the world. Soon, Jack sees the error of his ways, and teams up with Santa to destroy the Boogey Man.

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          Lesson: Walmart puts their Christmas decorations out way too early.

          5. A Goofy Movie

          Disney Goofy Movie Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

            Why don’t we ever talk about my mother?

            A goofy, yet well-meaning, father takes his goofy teenage son on a road trip in order to bond. His son, however, isn’t interested in hanging out with dad–he wants a girl. After much miscommunication between the two goofs, dad finally decides to stop cock-blocking his son and let him grow up.

            Lesson: You have to give your kid space to grow.

            6. Hercules

            Disney Hercules Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

              I’d like another layer of spray tan, please…

              The most perfect human specimen has 100 problems, and a girl is just one. Caught up in his parents’ sibling rivalry, the man grows up poor. Overcoming all obstacles, Hercules saves the world, gets the girl, and lives happily ever after. Centuries later, the poor, muscular Hercules is reimagined as a skinny, wealthy carpenter.

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              Lesson: The more perfect someone looks, the bigger their problems are.

              7. Wreck-It Ralph

              Disney Wreck It Ralph Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

                Good guy Ralph donated his cherry to the homeless…

                Ralph has a problem–he’s a disrupter, and everyone hates him for it. He’s a grown man with no wife or kids, so he’s dedicated to his job. Desperate to fit in, Ralph leaves to earn a medal, befriending a young glitch along the way. Ralph’s quest earns him the respect and acceptance of his neighbors, although he still sleeps alone.

                Lesson: Be compassionate to everyone, especially the outcasts.

                8. Mulan

                Disney Mulan Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

                  I’m  sorry you’re disappointed the man you fell in love with is really a woman…

                  In order to save her father, Mulan pretends to be a boy and joins China’s Million Man Army. As the first woman in the military, Mulan easily outsmarts the brutish men, saves the emperor, and wins the heart of the general. This is one of few examples of consensual relations in the military. By comparison, women in the modern American military fight an Invisible War.

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                  Lesson: Gender roles are overrated–anyone’s capable of changing the world.

                  9. A Bug’s Life

                  Disney Bugs Life Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

                    You gave birth to how many babies?!?

                    In a regimented world, one ant has an idea. Rather than blindly following orders, he seeks ways to make things more efficient for the entire colony, which annoys literally everyone but his best friend. When the grasshoppers attack, however, the ants rally around the quirky one to defeat their formidable foes and reinvigorate the colony.

                    Lesson: Listen to your employees; you never know what great ideas they may have.

                    10. Dinosaur

                    Disney Dinosaur Versability Brian Penny Lifehack

                      Flat-earthers beware…

                      In the prequel to Ice Age, God punishes the dinosaurs for having been placed on Earth by the Devil for the sole purpose of tricking scientists into debunking Christianity. Somehow the cursed demons survive just a smidge longer.

                      Lesson: Evolution happened…deal with it.

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                      Last Updated on August 6, 2020

                      6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                      6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                      We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

                      “Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

                      Are we speaking the same language?

                      My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

                      When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

                      Am I being lazy?

                      When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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                      Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

                      Early in the relationship:

                      “Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

                      When the relationship is established:

                      “Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

                      It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

                      Have I actually got anything to say?

                      When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

                      A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

                      When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

                      Am I painting an accurate picture?

                      One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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                      How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

                      Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

                      What words am I using?

                      It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

                      Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

                      Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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                      Is the map really the territory?

                      Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

                      A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

                      I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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