Advertising
Advertising

Make Your Life Easier and More Enjoyable in 10 Easy Steps

Make Your Life Easier and More Enjoyable in 10 Easy Steps

Wouldn’t it be great if genies were real and you could wish for a simpler life? As unfortunate as it is that mythical creatures don’t exist, you can learn to cultivate a more simple life on your own. The key to doing so lies in taking a deep breath, and thinking about the little choices you make every day.

1. Turn off your cell phone

If you’re constantly looking down at your phone, life is passing you by without you even realizing it. Use your cell phone only when absolutely necessary, and at other times put it away so you can engage with friends and family and be in the moment. You know those people you see out to dinner with a spouse constantly looking down at their phone to check their latest fantasy football stats? Don’t be one of them.

2. Savor the simple things

Waking up to puppy-dog kisses, taking a walk outside on a sunny day and enjoying a really good cup of coffee. Sometimes, it’s the simple things that make the biggest difference in your day. Don’t let them slip away without acknowledging them. Savor and delight in the simple things, soaking up all the happiness they bring you.

Advertising

3. Slow down and unwind

We live in a fast-paced world that is all about instant feedback and gratification. Take time to escape the rat race by slowing down and unwinding at some point during the day. Sit outside on the porch to read the paper and drink your morning coffee for a nice, peaceful start to your day. If you need to unwind at the end of a long day, pop in a yoga DVD to do when you get home. Figure out what makes you feel most relaxed, and find a way to make it a part of your daily routine.

4. Focus on things you’re passionate about

The wise Aristotle once said, “We are what we repeatedly do.” If you’re doing something you aren’t totally enthused about, you might want to rethink its role in your life. Obviously, there are certain things you have to do out of necessity, but beyond that, if it’s not necessary and it’s draining to you, cut it out of your life.

5. Cut back on your social media time

Don’t waste time on social media when you could be spending that time having face-to-face conversations with people who matter to you. Spending excessive amounts of time on social media is like bingeing on junk food. It feels good at the time, but you’ll probably just end up regretting it later. In fact, according to this infographic, 43 percent of teens express a desire to disconnect at times.

Advertising

6. Have a sense of humor and laugh off mistakes

If you’re human, you’re going to make mistakes. It’s part of the deal. Rather than agonize over them, laugh them off and learn from them. Life’s too short to take yourself too seriously.

7. Simplify your wardrobe

If you have a closet full of clothes (and I am guilty as charged), you can save time and simplify your life by simplifying your wardrobe. Keep the basics that you need and donate the rest. You’ll save yourself time in the morning when your wardrobe options have been cut in half.

8. Simplify your meals

Don’t feel like you have to be Rachel Ray in the kitchen every night. Look at the ingredients you already have on hand, and tap into your creativity to come up with a dish based on what you’ve got. Plan ahead and shop for meals a week at a time. On Sundays, map out what you want to have each night of the week, and shop for everything at once so you don’t have to make multiple runs to the store during the week.

Advertising

9. Communicate within designated parameters

Now that we have cell phones, email, Facebook messaging, Twitter, Skype and a variety of other communication means at our disposal, it’s important to be intentional about how much time you spend communicating. Set aside 10 to 15 minutes twice a day to deal with emails, and leave it at that. Don’t get suckered into the time-wasting trap of checking your inbox every 20 minutes.

10. Don’t be afraid to say no

If someone asks you to do something and you’re dreading the thought of completing the task, don’t be afraid to say no. Being upfront is much better than committing and having to back out later, and if you word it nicely, the other person will probably understand. Besides, standing up for yourself is nothing to cower away from. Don’t buy into the idea that you have to do everything.

Simplifying your life isn’t rocket science; it’s actually quite simple. Put these 10 principles into practice today, and the simpler life you’ve been dreaming of can be yours.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: photo credit:

More by this author

20 Money-Saving Hacks for Parents 20 Things All Mothers Need to Hear 12 Jaw-Dropping Vacation Spots That Will Leave You Awestruck The 20 Most Enjoyable Companies to Work For 40 Creative Ads That Will Inspire You

Trending in Communication

1The Gentle Art of Saying No 217 Ted Talks for Kids to Inspire Little Minds to Do Big Things 310 Toxic Persons You Should Just Get Rid Of 4Striving Towards Secure Attachment: How to Restructure Your Thoughts 5Being Self Aware Is the Key to Success: How to Boost Self Awareness

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

Advertising

But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

Advertising

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

Advertising

But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Advertising

Read Next