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7 Things Only Best Friends Would Understand

7 Things Only Best Friends Would Understand

Best friends often make life way more fun than it should be (let’s face it, things become pretty bleak when there’s nobody around to laugh at your terrible jokes). There’s nothing quite like having someone around who totally understands you and won’t judge you (or will judge you, depending on the situation). They’re brutally honest, interesting even after they’ve recited the same story to you a thousand times, and are aware of all the little inside jokes that crack both of you up no matter how many times you say them. Thanks to this close connection there’s a bunch of things that you’d only understand if you’re someone’s best friend, and I’ve listed a chunk of them below.

1. The look of abject horror on your best friend’s face when they see someone they hate.

7bestfriends#1

    Everybody hates somebody (insert laugh track here)! So it’s nice when your best friend is there to nod their head and say, “don’t worry man, I know exactly how you feel.” It’s even better if they proceed to join you in glaring at said hated person.

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    2. That hysterical expression you both make when you see the person who has been the brunt of your inside jokes for the past several years.

    7bestfriends#2

      In my small little group of best friends we’ve been dragging along an inside joke that’s lasted for several years, and it’s all based around one particular (unintentionally) hysterical person. When we see him, we can barely control ourselves.

      3. The fear and trepidation you both feel when arriving at a party that’s either full of creeps or people you don’t know.

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      7bestfriends#3

        So your best friend thought it’d be a good idea to drive out into the middle of nowhere and go to a party hosted by an acquaintance he knew in his freshmen English class a couple years back. You arrive and neither of you see anybody you know. Simultaneously, everyone in the party turns to glare at you suspiciously as you waltz in. You’re thankful you have a buddy because at this point you and your best friend might as well be (mentally) holding hands.

        4. If you’re of the opposite sex, having people think one of you friendzoned the other.

        4

          Having a best friend of the opposite sex is often a bit of an ordeal, as you’ll get people saying that you’re perfect for each other or assuming that one of you secretly has a crush on the other. In reality, you’re as platonic as can be and would much rather go out and be each other’s wingman/wingwoman than to do anything freaky together! That being said…

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          5. Planning to marry your best friend in case all of your plans fall through.

          7bestfriends#5

            Hey, you may not actually love your best friend in anything more than a “let’s drink beers and talk about Doctor Who” way, but it’s always nice to have a “we’ll marry each other when we’re 40” plan in place in the case that for some strange reason you’re both still alone!

            6. Downing a lot of alcohol together before dealing with people you aren’t comfortable with.

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              Everyone’s been in this situation before. You’re in your dingy little college apartment, vodka in one hand, whiskey in the other. Your best friend looks at you with an “eh, might as well” expression, and you both proceed to down as much as you can before the annoying acquaintance people show up at your doorstep. After a few minutes of sharing bottles and patting each other on the back, you’re finally ready to treat the incoming outsiders as if they were family (no matter how much this may freak them out).

              7. Feeling like you’ve just talked yesterday, when in reality you haven’t seen each other in months or years.

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                This is the mark of a true best friend! I often had friends go away in college for programs abroad only to pick up right where we left off when they got back. Same with my high school best friends: our relationships are almost exactly how they used to be, despite the fact that we’ve all been separated for multiple years due to college. You really can’t ask for more!

                Featured photo credit: pics_268/MorgueFile via mrg.bz

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                Last Updated on January 18, 2019

                7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

                7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

                Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

                But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

                If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

                1. Limit the time you spend with them.

                First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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                In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

                Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

                2. Speak up for yourself.

                Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

                3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

                This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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                But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

                4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

                Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

                This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

                Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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                5. Change the subject.

                When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

                Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

                6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

                Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

                I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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                You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

                Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

                7. Leave them behind.

                Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

                If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

                That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

                You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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