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15 Spanish Phrases You Must Know to Avoid Looking Stupid in Costa Rica

15 Spanish Phrases You Must Know to Avoid Looking Stupid in Costa Rica

How long has it been since you brushed up on your Spanish? Think your vocabulary is extensive enough to help you manage to get around in a Spanish-speaking country?

If you’re thinking of planning a trip to Costa Rica, or even becoming an expat and relocating there permanently, you’ve got your work cut out for you when it comes to learning the lingo.

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You may think you’re all set, because you have a working knowledge of Spanish.  But trust me, Costa Ricans, or (and here’s your first lesson) Ticos and Ticas as they’re called locally, have a language of their own. With a dialect as laid back as their lifestyle, Costa Rican speech is full of slang and idioms.

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Some are informal and used mostly by the younger generation. Others are commonly known and can even be used in formal conversation. Some words and phrases are unique to Costa Rica and have no real Spanish translation. Others have a connotation in Tico culture that means something completely different than their literal denotation. There are even a few that could get you in a whole heap of trouble if you use them in the wrong place at the wrong time.

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Here are 15 Tico words and phrases to know to help you avoid finding yourself in an awkward situation.

  • Pura vida – Literally translated as “pure life,” this phrase is the unofficial motto of Costa Rica. It can be used as a greeting, an acknowledgement, or just to reference anything that’s good. Example: Como estas? Pura vida! (How are you? Pure life.)
  • Mae – Originating from a word that means “dummy,” mae is a nickname you use for a pal or buddy, sort of like “dude.” Example: Mae vamos. (Dude, let’s go.)
  • Detras del palo – Literally translated, this means “behind the tree.” However, when someone says they’re detras del palo, it just means they’re unfamiliar with the topic or don’t know what you’re talking about. Another phrase with a similar meaning is “Miando fuera del tarro,” which literally translates as “taking a pee out of the can.”
  • Buena/mala nota – This translates to “good (or bad) grade,” and it’s used to indicate a job done well (or poorly) or to describe a person’s character. Example: Que mala nota! (What a terrible person!)
  • Rojos and tejas – “Rojos” literally means reds, and a “teja” is a tile.  But you’ll often hear these words used when describing the Costa Rican currency, colones. In that connotation, a “rojo” is the red bill that represents 1,000 colones ($2 US), and a “teja” refers to 100 colones. Una teja is actually 100 of anything, so if someone tells you to go “una teja” and turn left, that’s 100 meters or one block.
  • Harina – On that note, if someone asks you if you have any “harina” for payment, they’re not asking you to barter with a sack of flour (which is the literal meaning of the word). This is actually a slang word for money, sort of like calling it “dough.”
  • Deme un toque – If someone tells you this, understand that they aren’t asking to be caressed.  Even though it literally translates to “give me a touch,” what it really means is “give me a second.”
  • Cabra – If someone mentions they’re bringing their “cabra” to dinner, they probably don’t mean its literal translation, which is “goat.” Instead, “cabra” is the slang term ticos use for their girlfriends.
  • Pura paja – “Paja” is actually the word for “straw,” but this phrase doesn’t mean “pure straw” in Tico culture. It means “bull$#*!.”
  • Chunche – So you’ve had a blowout on some crappy Costa Rican backroad. Your buddy asks you to hand him that “chunche” and motions for the lug wrench. You hand it over, but then you’re confused when he once again motions and asks for another “chunche.” That’s because it doesn’t mean anything specific. It’s just a “thingamajig.”
  • Sodas – These establishments are all over Costa Rica, and they’re basically your typical small, mom-and-pop type restaurants that serve up local cuisine seriously cheap.
  • Pipa – This is something that’s okay to request from the bartender at your resort pool. He’ll hand you a cold, coconut drink. But it’s not a good thing to ask of the other kind of vendor who lurks in dark alleys. To him it’s a hash pipe.
  • Que pega – Literally translated as “what a stick,” this phrase is used to refer to someone or something that’s very annoying.
  • Lava huevos – Here’s another one that means nothing like it’s literal definition. Technically “wash the eggs,” this phrase refers to the act of sucking up to someone.
  • Que torta – This one means “what a patty” and is used to refer to someone who has royally screwed up or made a big mistake. It’s also often used to refer to an unplanned pregnancy.

So before you head to Costa Rica, make sure you brush up on these and other Costa Rican phrases. Don’t find yourself detras del palo!

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

What do I want to do with my life? It’s a question all of us think about at one point or another.

For some, the answer comes easily. For others, it takes a lifetime to figure out.

It’s easy to just go through the motions and continue to do what’s comfortable and familiar. But for those of you who seek fulfillment, who want to do more, these questions will help you paint a clearer picture of what you want to do with your life.

1. What are the things I’m most passionate about?

The first step to living a more fulfilling life is to think about the things that you’re passionate about.

What do you love? What fulfills you? What “work” do you do that doesn’t feel like work? Maybe you enjoy writing, maybe you love working with animals or maybe you have a knack for photography.

The point is, figure out what you love doing, then do more of it.

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2. What are my greatest accomplishments in life so far?

Think about your past experiences and the things in your life you’re most proud of.

How did those accomplishments make you feel? Pretty darn good, right? So why not try and emulate those experiences and feelings?

If you ran a marathon once and loved the feeling you had afterwards, start training for another one. If your child grew up to be a star athlete or musician because of your teachings, then be a coach or mentor for other kids.

Continue to do the things that have been most fulfilling for you.

3. If my life had absolutely no limits, what would I choose to have and what would I choose to do?

Here’s a cool exercise: Think about what you would do if you had no limits.

If you had all the money and time in the world, where would you go? What would you do? Who would you spend time with?

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These answers can help you figure out what you want to do with your life. It doesn’t mean you need millions of dollars to be happy though.

What it does mean is answering these questions will help you set goals to reach certain milestones and create a path toward happiness and fulfillment. Which leads to our next question …

4. What are my goals in life?

Goals are a necessary component to set you up for a happy future. So answer these questions:

Once you figure out the answers to each of these, you’ll have a much better idea of what you should do with your life.

5. Whom do I admire most in the world?

Following the path of successful people can set you up for success.

Think about the people you respect and admire most. What are their best qualities? Why do you respect them? What can you learn from them?

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You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.[1] So don’t waste your time with people who hold you back from achieving your dreams.

Spend more time with happy, successful, optimistic people and you’ll become one of them.

6. What do I not like to do?

An important part of figuring out what you want to do with your life is honestly assessing what you don’t want to do.

What are the things you despise? What bugs you the most about your current job?

Maybe you hate meetings even though you sit through 6 hours of them every day. If that’s the case, find a job where you can work more independently.

The point is, if you want something to change in your life, you need to take action. Which leads to our final question …

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7. How hard am I willing to work to get what I want?

Great accomplishments never come easy. If you want to do great things with your life, you’re going to have to make a great effort. That will probably mean putting in more hours the average person, getting outside your comfort zone and learning as much as you can to achieve as much as you can.

But here’s the cool part: it’s often the journey that is the most fulfilling part. It’s during these seemingly small, insignificant moments that you’ll often find that “aha” moments that helps you answer the question,

“What do I want to do with my life?”

So take the first step toward improving your life. You won’t regret it.

Featured photo credit: Andrew Ly via unsplash.com

Reference

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