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10 Powerful Books To Inspire Every Little Girl

10 Powerful Books To Inspire Every Little Girl

Reading to and encouraging children to read is terribly important, though it’s also important that the books they read are empowering and uplifting. When it comes to little girls, it’s particularly helpful to encourage them to believe in themselves and their abilities. The following ten books are fun and absolutely essential for anyone trying to empower young girls.

The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch

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    The Paper Bag Princess humorously chronicles the bravery of a young princess whose fiancé is kidnapped by a dragon. When she tries to save her prince however, he criticizes her unkempt appearance. A witty tale for young girls, this powerful book shows readers to never settle for less than they deserve.

    I Love My Hair by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley

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      I Love My Hair is a powerful story for young girls. A toddler named Keyana complains about her hair one night while her mother gets her ready for bed. Keyana’s mom helps her to understand why her hair is special and why we should celebrate things that set us apart. A beautifully illustrated story to help little girls accept and be proud of their looks.

      Odd Velvet by Mary Whitcomb

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        Odd Velvet centers around a little girl who sticks out like a sore thumb. Velvet’s odd qualities keep her from getting to know people at school and she starts to feel left out. As Velvet gets a chance to show her qualities to her classmates however, they see her for who she really is. A great book that celebrates every little girl’s uniqueness.

        I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont

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          I Like Myself is a powerful book about self acceptance for little girls. Set to rhyming verse, this upbeat story celebrates a little girl who loves who she is. Sure to help little girls appreciate themselves for who they are, I Like Myself is an enjoyable, humorous read.

          Winners Never Quit by Mia Hamm

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            In this fast-paced story from Olympian Mia Hamm, a young girl learns to love playing a sport more than winning or losing. Emphasizing the joy of pursuing what you love, this book is sure to engage young girls. An encouraging and powerful book, Winners Never Quit is perfect reading material for those with little girls.

            Black, White, Just Right by Marguerite W. Davol

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              This uplifting tale celebrates a multicultural family whose little girl is “just right.” Inclusive and optimistic, this book helps little girls admire differences in themselves and others. It also encourages girls to look past skin color and see a person based on their personality.

              The Skin You Live In by Micheal Tyler

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                Every young child is celebrated in this nursery rhyme, focusing on the ways skin makes us both different and similar. Ultimately the story highlights the importance of who we are beneath the skin, in a fun, upbeat way.

                Not All Princesses Dress In Pink by Jane Yolen

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                  This lighthearted book celebrates girls across a wide spectrum of interests and hobbies, all with optimistic rhyming text. The book doesn’t follow a particular story, instead opting to celebrate girls’ uniqueness in a free-form fashion.

                  Wilma Unlimited: How Wilma Rudolph Became the World’s Fastest Woman by Kathleen Krull

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                    This gripping story follows the life of Wilma Rudolph, who was expected to never walk again at just five-years-old. Instead of giving up, Wilma not only walked, but became an Olympic hero. An uplifting and supportive story, this book encourages girls to shoot for the stars.

                    Matilda by Roald Dahl

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                      No list of powerful books for girls is complete without this classic book by Roald Dahl. Chronicling the story of a little girl with no one to rely on, Matilda shows little girls to pursue their dreams, even when things look hopeless. An ultimately upbeat and inspiring tale, this book reminds girls they are capable and strong. 

                      Featured photo credit: Dana via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                      You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                      1. Connecting them with each other

                      Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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                      It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                      2. Connect with their emotions

                      Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                      For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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                      3. Keep going back to the beginning

                      Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                      On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                      4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                      After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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                      Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                      5. Entertain them

                      While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                      Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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                      6. Appeal to loyalty

                      Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                      In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                      7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                      Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                      Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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