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10 Mistakes 20-Somethings Should Stop Making Now

10 Mistakes 20-Somethings Should Stop Making Now

You are young and free. It’s sometimes hard to see how the decisions you make in your 20’s affect the rest of your life. The truth is, your 20’s are the foundation for the rest of your life. Here are 10 mistakes 20-somethings should stop making now to ensure a bight future.

You should stop wasting time.

You can waste time in many ways, especially before establishing your future. With your entire future ahead of you, it often can seem like there are unlimited amounts of time. It’s not the case. Use your time to do things that matter to you. Spend time on things like traveling, networking, building relationships, and climbing the corporate ladder. If your time-wasting hobbies are keeping you from being productive, take a hard look at limiting or eliminating them.

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You should stop wasting money.

Too often, in our 20’s, we want stuff. From expensive designer clothes, to fancy electronics, and many other possessions that take up a huge chunk of our income. Stop wasting money on these things. They are going to be out of date and out of style quicker than you imagine. Take your disposable income and invest in your future to ensure you have great experiences. Remember, memories last forever, so spending money on that trip to Europe will always be more valuable than a big screen TV that will need to be replaced in three years with the newer, larger model.

You should stop relying on social media.

Social media has it’s place, no doubt. It keeps us connected and can be a great way to stay in touch. But it can’t be the only way! Make sure you are maintaining real relationships and giving your friends and family the face time they need and deserve. You can see what someone is doing on Facebook, but unless you are with them in person, you’re viewing their memories rather than making your own.

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You should stop making everything a #1 priority.

Priorities. It seems like everything is vying to be at the top. Relationships, family, career, friends, pets, houses, school… they can be overwhelming! Take time to prioritize your life. It will make things less hectic and keep you from feeling overwhelmed.

You should stop spending time in a dead-end career.

It’s easy to stay in a career that’s leading no-where. Serving, bar-tending and retail can be great careers, but you want to make sure you understand the future ramifications. When you’re in your 20’s, working crazy hours and nights and weekends may seem like a perfect scenario. But as you get older and start with a family and friends, you can miss a lot based on that choice. Make sure you think about the future before deciding on the career you will pursue.

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You should stop staying in bad relationships.

Your first love can be hard to get over. And bad relationships can linger much too long. Stop spending time with people who don’t make you a better person. When you’re in a bad relationship, it will make the rest of your life more difficult. Evaluate your relationships and don’t wait to get out of poor situations.

You should stop relying too much on others.

Whether it’s depending on your parents for bills or relying on your co-workers to pick up the slack, your 20’s are a time to become more independent. Take help when you need it, but start working towards financial independence.

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You should stop worrying about the small stuff.

Too often we spend time worrying and dealing with petty things that turn into big, huge problems. Stop worrying about the small stuff. Whether it’s a fight with your significant other, a problem with your co-worker, or a problem in some area of your life, spend the time to fix it and move on.

You should stop partying like a rock star.

Have fun! You’re young. But you’re probably not a rock star. Stop acting like one. Don’t let having fun get in the way of what you need to do on a daily basis. Find other things to keep you occupied besides bars and clubs. You’ll quickly find you can have much more fun at the museum, at a sporting event, or a small festival. There’s plenty of ways to have a great time.

You should stop risking your future.

The key to it all? Make sure your 20’s set you up for a great future. Start saving your money. Make sure you are optimizing your career path. Ensure you find a great, healthy relationship that will be strong for years to come. Set yourself up so your future is bright. If you’re doing things that risk this future, change it now. There’s a lot of years in front of you, make sure you make them great.

Featured photo credit: Josef Seibel via flickr.com

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Kyle Robbins

Founder, BrandingBeard.com

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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