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10 Ideas for Writing a Letter of Love

10 Ideas for Writing a Letter of Love

“Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.”

― Mother Teresa

Does the idea of expressing your feelings to someone you care for make you feel nervous and tongue-tied? Writing a letter of love gives you the chance to take your time and use the right words to express your admiration and appreciation for your nearest and dearest. Whether you make the letter silly, funny, funky, or romantic, your words will come from the heart.

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1. Use an intriguing opener.

Do you have a special name who you call your beloved? You might want to use it at the start to immediately catch his or her attention. If not, consider using words like “My Dear,” “My Darling,” or “My Love” or something that is meaningful to you.

2. Tell the person exactly why you’re taking the time to write.

A love letter is different from any other type of correspondence, so make sure you tell the object of your affection from the outset the reason for your letter.

3. Discuss a happy memory the two of you shared.

During the time you have spent together, there have no doubt been many happy times. As you are writing your letter, relive one in detail and share your impressions of the event with your beloved. You’ll get bonus points if it’s something that he or she may have forgotten over time.

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4. Mention your beloved’s best qualities.

What makes your special person stand out from anyone else you know? Write it down and put it in your letter. The things you appreciate most may not be the things your beloved considers to be his or her most obvious strengths, so just speak from your heart. If you need a writing prompt, start with a partial sentence like:

  • “I appreciate you most when you…”
  • “Your greatest strength is…”
  • “The thing I think of first when your name comes to mind is…”

Complete the sentence with the first impression that you get. It will more than likely be the right one for your letter.

5. Talk about the difference he or she has made in your life.

Naturally, your life has changed for the better since you met the person to whom you are writing, and you’ll want to share this information in your love letter. This is not the place to mention any past loves, since that part of your life is over (and hopefully done with). You do want to share how much richer and fulfilling your life is now that your special someone is part of it.

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6. Choose the right stationery for your letter.

Since a love letter is not a standard piece of correspondence, you don’t necessarily want to write it on plain paper. Pay a visit to a store and look for some special paper in a favorite color or style that will set it apart. Don’t forget to buy an envelope, too. You’ll have to decide whether you want to hand-deliver your letter, mail it, or leave it somewhere for your beloved to find. Another option is to arrange for your letter to be delivered by a courier company, which means you will be sure that it reaches your beloved on a particular day.

7. Pen and paper is best for short notes.

If you are writing a short love letter, then do pick up a pen and paper. Not everyone has good penmanship skills, and if you are going to be writing a letter that is several pages in length, you can do your composing in a keyboard. The advantage of this option is that you can edit and move your text around if you don’t like the way you have written it in your first draft.

8. Choose a romantic font.

If you decide to use your keyboard to compose your love letter, be sure to change your font. Now is not the time to stick to a standard business font like Times New Roman 12 or Helvetica Regular 12. Experiment with the fonts in your word processing program to find one that you like and that fits the occasion. Look for one that imitates cursive writing if you can find it, and don’t hesitate to make the type larger than the standard 11 or 12 pitch to make it more legible. You don’t want your reader to have to squint to make out your words.

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9. Write your letter and let it sit for a day or two before sending.

Love letters are, by definition, highly emotional exercises. Read what you have written before sending it to your beloved after you have had some time to digest it. If you are happy with the results, send it.

10. Your letter doesn’t have to be perfect to be meaningful.

No one is looking for perfection in a love letter. Just write what is in your heart, and you’ll be using exactly the right language.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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