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Last Updated on February 9, 2021

Too Tired at Work? 4 Ways to Regain Focus and Balance

Too Tired at Work? 4 Ways to Regain Focus and Balance

I once heard it said, “No one gets a prize for burnout.” It’s a lovely saying, but how many of us abide by this ideology? Not many because if we did, Botox and wrinkle cream would be a thing of the past. We’re tired at work and because of work.

Since childhood, we’re groomed to work for the weekend, but working for two free days per week robs us from enjoying the other 260 days. None of us grew up with the mission to be exhausted, yet far too many of us have accepted this rat race as business as usual.

From Monday to Friday, we complain about the craziness, and then we escape on Saturday and Sunday with a pitcher of sangria. Isn’t this the way that life is supposed to be?

There’s nothing wrong with hard work. It’s what makes the world go round, but if our only moment of joy is zoning out to Hulu in our comfiest pajamas, we might need to rethink our chaotic schedule.

If you’re tired of grabbing your coffee on the run, yelling at the kids as you race to the door, and driving like a maniac to make it to your morning meeting, grab a nice glass of wine and enjoy this read.

In this article, I’ll reveal a couple of reasons why your exhausted and give you some practical tips to keep your sanity and social life without experiencing so much fatigue. Let’s get you started on this journey.

Why You Might Be Exhausted

Before I go to the practical tips, let’s first discuss the two main reasons why you might be tired, especially at work.

You Are Tied to Technology

According to Deloitte, most employees are exhausted. But more specifically, their source of depletion is tied to operating in an “always on” and “always available” work culture.[1]

Technology has removed all boundaries, and in many ways, it has removed an employee’s right to say no. Employees don’t feel like they have the option to shut off their phones, have a life separate from their job, or escape the piles of paperwork.

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This reality is leading to burnout and stress. Many employees feel like they can’t escape or even take a breath when they’re away from work because, in all honesty, they’re never away from the office.

Technology has made a business structure without walls, but that also means that there are no doors. This open concept of business is a blessing, but it’s also created a corporate environment that doesn’t respect personal boundaries.

This constant access to employees might work well for a company’s bottom line, but it will lead to higher burnout levels and employee dissatisfaction in the long run.

You Value Performance Instead of Purpose

Workforce Institute conducted a study and found that “95 percent of HR professionals perceive that employee burnout is sabotaging productivity” within the workplace.[2]

Repeat after me: “Life is more than the weekend.”

No amount of burnout will get you to the corner office. It doesn’t take higher energy levels to reach your goals. It requires making the right decisions. Remember, it’s not about working hard—it’s about working smart.

The hamster wheel will not get you to where you want to be. It will only lead you to more fatigue and frustration. If you feel stuck and tired at work, you’re not alone. You can shift your narrative and your sleep schedule, but if you want to change your life, then you need to change your habits.

4 Ways to Change the Way You Work

Change takes time. It also requires you to ask what you want out of life. When you take the time to know who you are and what you need, you’ll have the confidence to write your story. Pinning down your boundaries protects your purpose.

All of us experience exhaustion. But if you’re tired at work 99.9% of the time, then something needs to change, and it’s not always the job. Many times, the most significant change starts with us.

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You can regain your focus, but you need to take some time for personal introspection before experiencing higher productivity. Here are four tips that you can put into effect now!

1. Remember Your “Why”

What is your motivation?

When you were younger, you were compelled by your goals and driven by your dreams, but once you hit 30, you realized that you couldn’t pay the rent with pretend money or your 3-year vision board.

Sacrifice is a part of adulthood. After all, we’ve all learned how to pivot and survive the twists and turns. There’s nothing wrong with being responsible, but whether we like it or not, the strains of reality pop our bubble and push many of us towards burnout.

Stepping away from our foundational dreams comes at a price, which can include our health, our wholeness, and our sense of purpose. If we want to regain our focus, we need to take the time to rediscover what makes us tick. We have to make space in our schedules to work on our “why.” We can’t just be led by our “what.”

If we don’t take the time to remember the reason behind our work, we lose ourselves in it. If you want to regain your focus and stop being tired at work, you need to remember your purpose. Once you make that the foundation of your life, all of your decisions will center around that focus.

You can learn more about finding and sharpening your focus in this free guide: End Distraction And Find Your Focus

2. Recenter Your Life

One of the biggest things that you can do is to carve out time for contemplation. Now, I’m not talking about a quick morning ritual or a meditation retreat. I mean seeing yourself as a priority on your task list, not an option.

Too many of us sacrifice ourselves for the sake of deadlines. We spend days preparing our presentation and researching statistics, but we put off going to the gym or getting that extra hour of sleep. We worship doing more than being.

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Numerous studies have come to the same conclusion: We all need to put ourselves first if we want to thrive in business. But we don’t listen to the research. Too many of us continue to live off of coffee and spreadsheets regardless of the numbers. It’s not healthy, but it is tied to corporate culture.

Far too many companies reward this type of behavior. They expect their employees to be available 24/7 and bleed paperclips and printouts day-and-night. And it’s only gotten worse since we’ve started working from home.

According to the Harvard Business Review, “one of the best ways to manage through chaos is to anchor yourself in routine.”[3] Self-care has to be a part of our daily routine if we want to stop feeling tired at work. Regaining focus requires us to recenter ourselves. It demands that we place our needs into the equation without feeling guilty.

You can start by getting your blood flowing with exercise, drinking plenty of water, and taking at least 30 minutes each day to do something that brings you joy.

3. Rethink Your Expectations

We all remember the iconic line from Family Matters. Steve Urkel would hike up his pants, adjust his glasses, and utter those four iconic words that made him an endearing celebrity of the 90s.

“Did I do that?”

We can still picture his squeamish expression as he faced another kerfuffle that he had created. Many of us can relate.

After hours of exhaustion, we desperately try to keep our eyes open at work without running into walls. We blankly stare at the piles of paperwork, mindlessly nod as our boss asks us to add one more item to our checklist, and pray that we don’t drool through our endless meetings.

For many of us, this is our average workweek. We color-coordinate our schedules, add endless monotonous tasks to our week, and hope that we can balance everything without losing our sanity. What if there was a better way to survive?

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4. Reorganize Your Task List

If you’re continuously exhausted at work, one of the biggest things you can do to regain focus is to rethink your task list. You don’t need to accomplish everything, and even if you do, your task list doesn’t necessarily have to be solely done by you.

Before you begin the rat race on Monday mornings, use Sundays to restructure your work week. Write a list of people that you work with and their correlating skill sets. Then, look at your list of important tasks.

Break your task list into three columns. Fill the first section with tasks that only you can do. Then, fill the second section with functions that don’t need to be done or can be pushed to a future date. Lastly, fill the third section with tasks that can be done by others.

Adding items to your checklist might leave you feeling a sense of accomplishment, but if you continue to micromanage your task list, you won’t be able to move forward in the long term.

If you want to regain focus and stop being tired at work, start with your planner. Not everything needs to be crossed off or completed. Sometimes, the best way to meet your goals is to remove the ones keeping you stuck.

Final Thoughts

If you’re tired of being tired at work, take a look at these four tips, and implement one of these practices into your week. Remember, it’s not a race, and these tips are not just another thing to add to your task list. Their purpose is to help you understand your specific triggers that lead to burnout.

If you want to restore your joy, remember your why, and recenter your life—you need to understand yourself. Take time to implement boundaries that provide work-life balance. Make this the year that you enjoy your work week, not the year that makes you pray for the weekend.

More Tips For When You’re Tired at Work

Featured photo credit: Shane via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Dr. Colleen Batchelder

Diversity and Inclusion Consultant and Leadership Strategist | Executive Coach | Dr. Batchelder teaches business leaders how to create corporations where Millennials want to work.

64 Monday Motivation Quotes to Start the Week Right How To Be a Self-Starter And Take Initiative At Work Too Tired at Work? 4 Ways to Regain Focus and Balance How To Be Proactive At Work: 4 Habits To Build 6 Surefire Tips to Build Self-Confidence That Is Unstoppable

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Published on April 14, 2021

How To Relieve Stress And Restore Energy

How To Relieve Stress And Restore Energy

You didn’t get to where you are in life without learning how to relieve stress along the way. But just because you’ve “been there, done that” doesn’t necessarily mean it is going to be easier this time around. Granted life experience will likely have taught you the old refrain, “this too shall pass” but that same life experience will also likely have taught you something about the active role you need to take to combat stress from time to time and how we could all stand to benefit from a stress-busting reboot.

I think we all know the dangerous side effects of too much stress in our lives. Stress is a major contributor to many poor health outcomes, such as diabetes, weight gain, hypertension, poor memory, and a whole host of mental health issues.[1] Therefore, how we manage the stress in our lives, needs to be revisited with a fresh and new perspective, in the same way, we need to clean out and freshen up our closet every so often.

Below are my top 10 strategies to relieve stress and restore energy with a fresh look at some old favorites that are guaranteed to help you self-optimize for health and happiness in body, mind, and spirit.

1. Compartmentalize—Prioritization on Steroids

People think of the compartmentalizing tactic in different ways, and there are negative associations with this term. However, when I suggest that you compartmentalize to manage your stress—or better yet, relieve stress—what I am referring to is the idea that you block out certain parts of your life that are distracting you from what you need to do in your daily life.

For example, you are at work but also have some extraordinary stress in your private life due to ailing parents with no siblings to share in the caretaking. Managing this alongside your own family and professional responsibilities, which were already heavy enough, places an enormous amount of stress on you.

When you compartmentalize, you put up mental blinders to help you focus on the task in front of you with the knowledge that managing your parent’s living and financial situation will be handled in due time after work hours.

Learning how to block out these different realms of your life will help you prioritize and manage the work that is in front of you.

2. Get Outside, It’s Like Therapy

Simply getting outside in the fresh air will automatically bring down your stress levels and restore some lost energy.[2] The research around this growing field known as ecotherapy is proving once again how powerful nature is and how we can improve our mental wellbeing along with our physical and spiritual health with time outdoors.[3]

When you are outside, you are more likely to have increased activity levels and will be exposing yourself to the mood-boosting sun, which helps our body create vitamin D. Research on vitamin D indicates that those who are vitamin D deficient may be more susceptible to inflammatory illness, depression and lowered resistance to stress, and more and more of us are becoming vitamin D deficient across the United States.[4]

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Spending as little as 10 minutes outside every day can be enough to improve mood, mental focus, and decrease blood pressure. Think of the increased concentration and improved efficiency you will get as a return on investment that yields way better growth on your aptitude and attitude for life.

3. Do an Organization Reboot

We all know the secret to success is largely due to organization or at least some form of it. I would argue that organization is a process. We build structures to organize information and life events based on our current demands. Over the course of your life, this will vary and probably increase as your life becomes more complicated, which will force you to innovate and change things up as you go.

What was enough in college or your first job out of college may not be enough at this point in your life. Furthermore, many, many systems can help us organize, and too many can detract from their intended benefits.

Assessing and weeding out the unnecessary systems or consolidating from the many to one might just be the answer.

Is a family calendar on Google more efficient than the calendar hanging in the kitchen? Don’t just assume that the answer will be in tech. Sometimes the old-fashioned pen and paper is more practical and might also serve as a better physical reminder—think of the whiteboard in the kitchen vs the hidden “to-do list” on your smartphone with reminders that consistently fail.

Another strategy for your organization reboot is an organization self-assessment. First, what it is that you need help organizing, and what the intended outcome is? Is it for communication purposes—to make sure that everyone is on the same page—or is it to help you process and think about the workload in front of you? Answering these 2 questions will help you move forward as you think about what makes the most sense for you, your family, or your team at work.

Another way to approach an organization reboot is to ask other people how they stay organized. This is especially helpful when taking on new responsibilities that might come with a job change or a new family dynamic.

I did this in a new position I recently took and by collecting data on how other people approached their work (think of the complex systems in public education), I was able to create “a best practice” that worked for me and that I could share with my colleagues. Something that could earn you some extra kudos is a bonus, especially when you are the new kid on the block.

4. Engage Your Creative Brain

When we engage the creative parts of ourself we tap into the part of our brain that releases dopamine, which has a naturally calming, therapeutic effect. Needless to say, this will almost immediately help us to relax and will lower our stress levels. One of the premises for which art therapy has been well established.

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In one study, in particular, it was found that after just 45 minutes of engaging with artistic materials, regardless of the level of production or artistic talent the person had, there was a notable decrease of cortisol in 75% of the participants.[5]

Music therapy is another form of creative art that can relieve stress and restore our energy.[6] Many of us use music to help us decompress or move into another part of our day or activity. Music also taps into this part of our brain that increases focus and can help us emulate the feeling or “vibe” we perceive in the music. As we know, upbeat music will help you feel more positive while slower music can help you feel more relaxed by easing some of the tension in your body.

There are tons of great playlists out there aimed at stress relief. The next time you are on your preferred music streaming service, test out a few and see which works for you. Needless to say, music is one of those things that we can have in the background while moving forward with other parts of our day.

Perhaps this is another area in need of a reboot that could enhance your stress relief routine.

5. Do You Need a Vacation or Weekend Away?

Vacation opportunities may not be as readily available as we would like. However, it doesn’t have to be a week in the tropics to feel the benefits of a short break from your everyday routine.

If we are optimizing our time with some of the above strategies, perhaps we might be able to sneak in that weekend getaway or even just a day trip with the family. Getting out of your everyday environment, especially when trying to build in some respite and relieve stress, can do wonders for our mind, body, and spirit.

We may love our homes, but they do represent the endless “to-do list” and remind us of all the things that contribute to our stress levels. Getting away from this environment where you can get outside and engage in some of your favorite activities with your favorite people will free your mind and your body.

Granted, COVID-19 has definitely hindered our road trip or vacation opportunities. However, with a little creativity, we can build in the little breaks that we need to relieve some stress, reconnect with the people who are important in our lives, and help us to feel ready for the next hurdle in front of us.

6. Meditation and Mindfulness, Make Them a Habit

Meditation and mindfulness can offer endless benefits to us emotionally and psychologically, which will naturally relieve stress. Many of those benefits include increased focus, relaxation, and a decrease in the mental clutter in your head.

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One of the biggest challenges with mediation or mindfulness is that to feel the impact, we need to practice it consistently, which takes discipline. The people who are most successful at integrating mediation and mindfulness into their self-care and stress relief routines are people who build it into their daily practices.

And as is true with many strategies, we don’t need to spend hours doing it. Just 5 or 10 minutes a day can make a difference, but we do need to make sure we are doing it.

Maybe there is a 5 or 10-minute window at the end or beginning of your day where you could fit this consistently? There are lots of great apps to help guide you through your mediation with music and visualization.

7. Fight Off “Aloneliness” and Find Your Alone Time

I read an article recently about “aloneliness,” which is the opposite of loneliness. As an introvert, I have always been that person who replenishes her energy from time alone but never quite thought about the craving as a likening to loneliness for the introvert.

The benefits of alone time are science-backed and include those things that many times go out the window when we are stressed and overwhelmed—things like creativity, mental strength, and productivity. The COVID-19 pandemic has left many people without the opportunity to have their alone time, which could be another reason that you are feeling more stressed and less able to deal with your daily challenges.

You might need to be strategic, but you could build some alone time into your life with a walk outside to get lunch for example, which will also be incorporating strategy #2 on this list.

8. Find Balance in Your Life

Stress can turn our lives upside down and throw everything off-kilter. Finding your equilibrium, getting your bearings straight, and finding the balance in your life between the many demands of family, partner, work, and friends is essential.

If you are feeling increased stress, take a look at the demands around you and make sure that there is a balance between the different parts of your life—in particular, the areas where you find more nourishment for the soul.

Incorporating the well-known life coaching strategy “life wheel” is a great way to think about the different parts of your life to ensure that you are giving all areas the time and attention that they need.

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9. Maintain Good Sleep Hygiene

It’s no secret that sleep can be your best friend or public enemy number one. As the saying goes, “what a difference a day can make” is in large part due to a restful night’s sleep. However, when we are stressed, sleep is one of the first things to get out of whack.

If you are going through a period of high stress, you are likely feeling an increase in outside or family demands. Finding the time to fit it all in may naturally creep into your sleeping hours or, on the other hand, the stress might keep you from being able to get a restful night’s sleep. Either of these two scenarios is a case where it might be good to take a look at your sleep routine and force you to be a little more protective of it.

Some of my go-to tips and strategies around maintaining healthy sleep hygiene are:[7]

  1. Plan ahead
  2. Maintain your physical activity
  3. Limit alcohol
  4. Sleep in a cooler environment
  5. Get plenty of fresh air

So, before you get to thinking that you can sleep “later,” remember that healthy people and well-balanced lives have a healthy amount of sleep in their lives.

10. Animal Love

There’s tons of research out there about the benefits of having a pet, in particular, a dog or a cat. Taking care of a pet or any member of the animal kingdom can have such a positive impact on our mood and psychological well-being that our brain releases a hormone known as oxytocin, dubbed the love hormone.

We get this hormone from other nurturing (human) relationships as well, but we cannot underestimate the impact this can have on us when we care for and connect with one of our four-legged buddies. A case in point is the fact that many pet owners report feeling a connection to their pet that rivals that of any significant human connection and, in some cases, can even be more significant than a human-to-human connection.[8]

Additionally, having a pet will likely promote other healthy habits. Some of which I spoke about above, such as being outside more often and increasing your physical activity. On a social level, connecting with friends and neighbors about your pet creates a shared connection—another protective factor in the fight against stress.

Botton Line

Modern life places many demands on us which hits us in different ways during different periods of our lives. Maintaining our physical, mental, and spiritual well-being requires a fresh and renewed approach every so often.

If you take the time today—to take care of yourself for tomorrow by revamping the old worn-out items in your self-care toolbox—you will reap the benefits 20 fold! Learning how to relieve stress from our life is a process that we will need to revisit time and time again, each time getting better and better.

More Tips on How to Cope With Stress

Featured photo credit: Candice Picard via unsplash.com

Reference

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