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Are Carbs More Addictive Than Cocaine?

Are Carbs More Addictive Than Cocaine?

Mmm, bread. There’s a good chance you love the stuff. And if you can, somehow, turn down a basket of rolls at a restaurant, some other carb probably tempts you. Have you ever wondered why we love eating pasta, pizza, burgers and plain old bread so much? Carbs (not unlike cocaine) give you a rush.

With a new year upon us, there’s a high probability you’ve decided to get in better shape. This involves lessening your bread/carb intake. But this isn’t easy, even if you think of yourself as a motivated and strong-willed individual. You see, carbohydrates create cravings in your brain and can create intense longing for them.

Sure, carbohydrates aren’t a drug, but in the same way coke can wreck your brain, carbs can wreck your body.[1] While some carb lovers may be pointing to the food pyramid for justification, keep in mind that graph was created in the 70’s, long before obesity became such an epidemic.

Gary Taubes, author of Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health says,

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“You could live your whole life and never eat a single carbohydrate—other than what you get from mother’s milk and the tiny amount that comes naturally in meat—and probably be just fine.”

Yes, we need carbohydrates, but our bodies can make them with the good stuff we eat, like leafy greens and even animal fat. We don’t need the refined carbs.

Are carbs necessary?

While we do need a certain amount of carbohydrates to fuel all of our metabolic processes so we can have energy to do things from breathe, digest, run, do work, think, etc. there is too much of a good thing. Especially if the “thing” is refined carbohydrates.

Carbohydrates will short-circuit your body.

Your metabolism normally stores energy from food so you can use it as fuel later, say for a workout or just getting through your work day. If your diet is packed with carbs (think: bagel in the morning, sandwich at lunch, pasta for dinner), you’re going to reprogram your metabolism, locking your food away as unburnable fat. When you get hungry again you will only want carbs.[2]

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    All carbohydrates convert to sugar in your bloodstream.

    It comes down to is this: the more refined the carbohydrates are, the faster they convert to sugar. But make no mistake, even if it happens slowly, all carbs become sugar.

    When your body breaks down a food, your cells look for glucose to convert into energy. They send this on to the muscles and tissues in your body. If they find themselves with extra glucose, they store it, mainly in the liver, but the rest becomes stored fat.

    Too much of any carbohydrate can lead to chronic diseases like obesity and diabetes since it all ends up as glucose.

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    Reap the health benefits of good carbs

      Don’t worry, this isn’t the article that tells you to drop the carbs cold turkey and ignore the cravings. While that would certainly be an impressive success, for now you can focus on choosing carbohydrates full of fiber. These are the carbs that absorb slowly into your system, therefore avoiding those dangerous spikes in your blood sugar levels. These include whole grains, veggies, fruits, and of course beans.

      Minimize the health risk of bad carbs by eating fewer refined and processed carbohydrates that strip away beneficial fiber. While it can be so tempting to pick up a cinnamon bun while shopping at the mall, is it really delicious enough to risk your health over? If you can focus on the long-term effects, saying no to a sweet treat can be simpler.

      Replace refined carbohydrates with vegetables when you prepare or order a meal. One of my favorite tricks is using riced cauliflower in place of rice. It’s excellent in everything from a southern meal to something loaded with curry!

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      And don’t forget you can get enough carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, and protein. Start small and order your next burger without the bun – opt for lettuce instead! It’s not about changing your whole eating routine, but rather substituting some of the poorer habits.

      Do what you can to lessen your consumption of pasta, white bread, white rice, and chips in particular. This is so tricky, since these are the items that always seem to be within reach. If you eat regularly throughout the day and keep your blood sugar steady, it can be much easier to say no to these tempting foods.

      Just say no

      The next time your tempted to reach for a slice of bread at a restaurant or order bagel at Panera, remember that you wouldn’t start your day or begin a meal by ingesting drugs, so why would you pay for something so detrimental to your health? It may feel dramatic to think of it this way, but the research is there; refined carbohydrates are unnecessary, unhealthy and unwise. Dare to resist!

      Featured photo credit: Couleur via pixabay.com

      Reference

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      Sam Aloysius

      Self proclaimed chai expert

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      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

      1. Work on the small tasks.

      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

      2. Take a break from your work desk.

      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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      3. Upgrade yourself

      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

      4. Talk to a friend.

      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

      7. Read a book (or blog).

      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

      8. Have a quick nap.

      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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      9. Remember why you are doing this.

      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

      10. Find some competition.

      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

      11. Go exercise.

      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

      12. Take a good break.

      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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