Advertising
Advertising

Get the Best Deal to Your Next Travel Destination in Minutes With Hitlist

Get the Best Deal to Your Next Travel Destination in Minutes With Hitlist

Whether you’re trying to see different parts of the world, visit family, or work, many rely on air travel to get where you want to go. Airfare can make or break plans, but it’s not always easy to stay updated on the best deals during your travel window.

When you’re trying to go somewhere, you are at the mercy of time. You either actively search for deals to get to your destination in your limited free time and hope that you find a good price, or you wait for a promotion to pop up. You may even ask all your friends to be on the lookout for cheap flights.

None of these methods of bargain-hunting guarantee success. Despite your best efforts, you might still be left paying a steep price or abandoning your travel plans altogether.

Planning is hard—even when you do your homework on airfares. It can take a lot of effort to go through different sites and input combinations in the hopes of snagging a great deal. Then, when you think you’ve found something, you have to pounce on it, not knowing whether it will be cheaper in the future. The search for a good flight at a low price can be mentally exhausting.

If you too are unsatisfied with the price of tickets, you’ll be excited to know that there’s an app designed to simplify the process of finding the perfect itinerary.

Hitlist makes it easier than ever to find the right flight

The Hitlist app takes the guesswork out of finding the best deal. With Hitlist, you can browse current airfare, and the app will notify you when a great deal pops up. Hitlist arms you with knowledge so that you don’t have to second-guess the quality of the bargains you identify.

Advertising

1. Make your Hitlist to receive targeted travel deals

When you create a profile with Hitlist, enter your home airport and add destinations that you’d like to visit to your hitlist. To access your hitlist, select the “Profile” icon on the bottom righthand corner of your screen.

    Alternatively, you can add locations to your hitlist by selecting the “My Hitlist” icon. After you add a location to your hitlist, the app scours the internet for the best deals, and sends you a notification when it finds flights that meet your criteria.

    To enable notifications, find the gear shaped icon at the top right of the profile page. This will take you to the app’s settings.

      Update your profile and preferences at any time on the “Settings” page.

      Advertising

        The fourth option down on the settings page is “Notifications.” Going to the “Notifications” sections allows you to enable email and push notifications. Curtail these notices to meet your preferences.

        For this example, I have chosen to be notified when Hitlist finds a spectacular deal by push notification only. The mobile device icon is highlighted in blue to indicate that that is the option I have selected.

          2. Access flight deals based on flexible dates or destinations

          The search function allows you to look for deals based on location. You can either search for a specific destination, or you can peruse the deals Hitlist has found for you.

          Advertising

            When I visit the “All Deals” option on the search page, Hitlist offers me a list of suggested destinations, the number of deals for each location, and the lowest price for a trip.

            By selecting a location, you can view the deals that Hitlist has identified. The app will show you the airline, dates, length of the trip, and the cost.

            3. View historical ticket prices to make informed travel decisions

            One of the best features of Hitlist is that it makes it easy to find out whether the deal you see is actually a good deal. The app sifts through historical data on itineraries similar to yours, and then it labels the deals as average, good, great, or spectacular. These options are color-coded so that it’s simple to tell how your itinerary ranks.

            For example, if I wanted to take a trip from Honolulu to Hong Kong soon, I could quickly locate all the deals that would take me to Hong Kong. When I select my destination, that app generates a list with prices ranging from lowest to highest.

            If I select the lowest-cost deal, the following information shows up:

            Advertising

              Hitlist ranks this itinerary as a great deal, and it displays the criteria that it would need to meet to be considered a spectacular deal.

              Knowing this information, I might choose to seize this opportunity because I’d rather pay the $445 now than risk losing that deal to potentially save $15. If Hitlist categorized this as average airfare, I’d be tempted to hold out for something better.

              4. Plan trips with your friends

              People are much more mobile than they used to be, which means that it’s not uncommon for groups of friends to be scattered to the four winds. On your profile page, you can add friends by clicking on the icon that looks like a person with a plus sign next to it.

              When you have added your friends, you will be able to see the places that they’d like to go. You could plan your next big adventure together on Hitlist.

              Download Hitlist to find the best deals

              Hitlist saves you money and time when you’re planning your next trip. The user-friendly interface makes finding deals a breeze, and the customizable features allow you refine the capabilities of this app to better serve you.

              Hitlist is free to download through the Apple Store. A beta version is currently available for Android devices, but it promises to have all the functionality of the fully developed Apple version soon.

              Don’t let the prospect of being overwhelmed by information be a barrier to travel. Hitlist takes all the guesswork out of the airfare so that you can spend time doing other things—like planning what you’ll do when you reach your destination.

              More by this author

              Brian Lee

              Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

              100 Incredible Life Hacks That Make Life So Much Easier 10 Best New Products That People Don’t Know About Book Summary: The Power of Habit in 2 Minutes 1 Minute Book Summary: How To Make People Like You in 90 Seconds or Less 2 Minutes Book Summary: Thinking Fast and Slow

              Trending in Smartcut

              1 How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide) 2 How to Find New Growth Opportunities at Work 3 How to Ask for Help When You Need It Most 4 How Much Do You Need to Give Up to Start Over? 5 Is It Really Better to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone?

              Read Next

              Advertising
              Advertising
              Advertising

              Last Updated on March 21, 2019

              11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

              11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

              Most gurus talk about habits in a way that doesn’t help you:

              You need to push yourself more. You can’t be lazy. You need to wake up at 5 am. You need more motivation. You can never fail…blah blah “insert more gibberish here.”

              But let me share with you the unconventional truths I found out:

              To build and change habits, you don’t need motivation or wake up at 5 am. Heck, you can fail multiple times, be lazy, have no motivation and still pull it off with ease.

              It’s quite simple and easy to do, especially with the following list I’m going to show to you. But remember, Jim Rohn used to say,

              “What is simple and easy to do is also simple and easy not to do.”

              The important things to remember when changing your habits are both simple and easy, just don’t think that they don’t make any difference because they do.

              In fact, they are the only things that make a difference.

              Let’s see what those small things are, shall we?

              1. Start Small

              The biggest mistake I see people doing with habits is by going big. You don’t go big…ever. You start small with your habits.

              Want to grow a book reading habit? Don’t start reading a book a day. Start with 10 pages a day.

              Want to become a writer? Don’t start writing 10,000 words a day. Start with 300 words.

              Want to lose weight? Don’t stop eating ice cream. Eat one less ball of it.

              Whatever it is, you need to start small. Starting big always leads to failure. It has to, because it’s not sustainable.

              Start small. How small? The amount needs to be in your comfort zone. So if you think that reading 20 pages of a book is a bit too much, start with 10 or 5.

              It needs to appear easy and be easy to do.

              Do less today to do more in a year.

              2. Stay Small

              There is a notion of Kaizen which means continuous improvement. They use this notion in habits where they tell you to start with reading 1 page of a book a day and then gradually increase the amount you do over time.

              Advertising

              But the problem with this approach is the end line — where the “improvement” stops.

              If I go from reading 1 page of a book a day and gradually reach 75 and 100, when do I stop? When I reach 1 book a day? That is just absurd.

              When you start a habit, stay at it in the intensity you have decided. Don’t push yourself for more.

              I started reading 20 pages of a book a day. It’s been more than 2 years now and I’ve read 101 books in that period. There is no way I will increase the number in the future.

              Why?

              Because reading 40 to 50 books a year is enough.

              The same thing applies to every other habit out there.

              Pick a (small) number and stay at it.

              3. Bad Days Are 100 Percent Occurrence

              No matter how great you are, you will have bad days where you won’t do your habit. Period.

              There is no way of going around this. So it’s better to prepare yourself for when that happens instead of thinking that it won’t ever happen.

              What I do when I miss a day of my habit(s) is that I try to bounce back the next day while trying to do habits for both of those days.

              Example for that is if I read 20 pages of a book a day and I miss a day, the next day I will have to read 40 pages of a book. If I miss writing 500 words, the next day I need to write 1000.

              This is a really important point we will discuss later on rewards and punishments.

              This is how I prepare for the bad days when I skip my habit(s) and it’s a model you should take as well.

              4. Those Who Track It, Hack It

              When you track an activity, you can objectively tell what you did in the past days, weeks, months, and years. If you don’t track, you will for sure forget everything you did.

              There are many different ways you can track your activities today, from Habitica to a simple Excel sheet that I use, to even a Whatsapp Tracker.

              Peter Drucker said,

              “What you track is what you do.”

              So track it to do it — it really helps.

              But tracking is accompanied by one more easy activity — measuring.

              5. Measure Once, Do Twice

              Peter Drucker also said,

              “What you measure is what you improve.”

              So alongside my tracker, I have numbers with which I measure doses of daily activities:

              For reading, it’s 20 pages.
              For writing, it’s 500 words.
              For the gym, it’s 1 (I went) or 0 (didn’t go).
              For budgeting, it’s writing down the incomes and expenses.

              Tracking and measuring go hand in hand, they take less than 20 seconds a day but they create so much momentum that it’s unbelievable.

              6. All Days Make a Difference

              Will one day in the gym make you fit? It won’t.

              Will two? They won’t.

              Will three? They won’t.

              Which means that a single gym session won’t make you fit. But after 100 gym sessions, you will look and feel fit.

              What happened? Which one made you fit?

              The answer to this (Sorites paradox)[1] is that no single gym session made you fit, they all did.

              No single day makes a difference, but when combined, they all do. So trust the process and keep on going (small).

              7. They Are Never Fully Automated

              Gurus tell you that habits become automatic. And yes, some of them do, like showering a certain way of brushing your teeth.

              But some habits don’t become automatic, they become a lifestyle.

              What I mean by that is that you won’t automatically “wake up” in the gym and wonder how you got there.

              It will just become a part of your lifestyle.

              Advertising

              The difference is that you do the first one automatically, without conscious thought, while the other is a part of how you live your life.

              It’s not automatic, but it’s a decision you don’t ponder on or think about — you simply do it.

              It will become easy at a certain point, but they will never become fully automated.

              8. What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

              Marshall Goldsmith has a great book with the same title to it. The phrase means that sometimes, you will need to ditch certain habits to make room for other ones which will bring you to the next step.

              Don’t be afraid to evolve your habits when you sense that they don’t bring you where you want to go.

              When I started reading, it was about reading business and tactic books. But two years into it, I switched to philosophy books which don’t teach me anything “applicable,” but instead teach me how to think.

              The most important ability of the 21st century is the ability to learn, unlearn, and relearn. The strongest tree is the willow tree – not because it has the strongest root or biggest trunk, but because it is flexible enough to endure and sustain anything.

              Be like a willow, adapting to the new ways of doing things.

              9. Set a Goal and Then Forget It

              The most successful of us know what they want to achieve, but they don’t focus on it.

              Sounds paradoxical? You’re right, it does. But here is the logic behind it.

              You need to have a goal of doing something – “I want to become a healthy individual” – and then, you need to reverse engineer how to get there with your habits- “I will go to the gym four times a week.”

              But once you have your goal, you need to “forget” about it and only focus on the process. Because you are working on the process of becoming healthy and it’s always in the making. You will only be as healthy as you take care of your body.

              So you have a goal which isn’t static but keeps on moving.

              If you went to the gym 150 times year and you hit your goal, what would you do then? You would stop going to the gym.

              This is why goal-oriented people experience yo-yo effect[2] and why process-oriented people don’t.

              The difference between process-oriented and goal-oriented people is that the first focus on daily actions while others only focus on the reward at the finish line.

              Set a goal but then forget about it and reap massive awards.

              10. Punish Yourself

              Last two sections are pure Pavlovian – you need to punish bad behavior and reward good behavior. You are the only person who decides what is good and what is bad for you, but when you do, you need to rigorously follow that.

              Advertising

              I’ve told you in point #3 about bad days and how after one occurs, I do double the work on the next day. That is one of my forms of punishments.

              It’s the need to tell your brain that certain behaviors are unacceptable and that they lead to bad outcomes. That’s what punishments are for.

              You want to tell your brain that there are real consequences to missing your daily habits.[3]

              No favorite food to eat or favorite show to watch or going to the cinema for a new Marvel movie- none, zero, zilch.

              The brain will remember these bad feelings and will try to avoid the behaviors that led to them as much as possible.

              But don’t forget the other side of the same coin.

              11. Reward Yourself

              When you follow and execute on your plan, reward yourself. It’s how the brain knows that you did something good.

              Whenever I finish one of my habits for the day, I open my tracker (who am I kidding, I always keep it open on my desktop) and fill it with a number. As soon as I finish reading 20 pages of a book a day (or a bit more), I open the tracker and write the number down.

              The cell becomes green and gives me an instant boost of endorphin – a great success for the day. Then, it becomes all about not breaking the chain and having as many green fields as possible.

              After 100 days, I crunch some numbers and see how I did.

              If I have less than 10 cheat days, I reward myself with a great meal in a restaurant. You can create your own rewards and they can be daily, weekly, monthly or any arbitrary time table that you create.

              Primoz Bozic, a productivity coach, has gold, silver, and bronze medals as his reward system.[4]

              If you’re having problems creating a system which works for you, contact me via email and we can discuss specifics.

              In the End, It Matters

              What you do matters not only to you but to the people around you.

              When you increase the quality of your life, you indirectly increase the quality of life of people around you. And sometimes, that is all the “motivation” we need to start.

              And that’s the best quote for the end of this article:

              “Motivation gets you started, but habits keep you going.”

              Keep going.

              Advertising

              More Resources to Help You Build Habits

              Featured photo credit: Anete Lūsiņa via unsplash.com

              Reference

              [1] Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Sorites paradox
              [2] Muscle Zone: What causes yo-yo effect and how to avoid it?
              [3] Growth Habits: 5 Missteps That Cause You To Quit Building A Habit
              [4] Primoz Bozic: The Lean Review: How to Plan Your 2019 in 20 Minutes

              Read Next