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How Saving Money Is Still Possible Even If You’re on a Tight Budget

How Saving Money Is Still Possible Even If You’re on a Tight Budget

We have all been there. Checking our bank accounts obsessively, fruitlessly hoping that money will just show up. Maybe you’re in the midst of a job transition, or maybe you don’t have a steady job at all. Whether you make your money through odd-jobs, a steady salary or part time work, there is a way to save money, despite the budget.

It’s scary, right? Trying to make ends meet while not turning into a recluse and always having to make up excuses while you can’t go out. You can start to feel like a bad friend and a lame person. But that’s just not the truth. We’ve all struggled with money, despite our age or profession. It takes time, effort and a whole lot of patience and self-forgiveness before you can figure out the right way to save. But there is hope!

When You Get Money in Your Account, Pay Yourself First

Even if you don’t earn much at the moment, there is no excuse of spending more than you save. Have you ever heard the expression, “Pay yourself first?” Whether you have a salary in which you automatically contribute a percentage of your paycheck to a 401k or your savings account, or even an old-school piggy bank where you store loose change, it’s so important to pay yourself (aka: put some money aside) before you spend on anything else. And if you use the solutions below, it can be easier than you think.

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Saving Money Can Be Easier Than You Think If You Do These 8 Things Regularly

1. Negotiate new rates and fees

This one can be scary for people who aren’t used to asking for things, but it’s so important and it really does work. I hate owning credit cards, but with an upcoming wedding, it’s sort of a necessary evil for me. But I was really sick of the high APR on the card I used often because I had been a long time customer and always paid more than minimum. Once I had paid the card off, I called and told them they would either lower my interest, or I would take my business elsewhere. Guess which one they chose?

You can also do this with utility bills. Call the companies and ask if they can work with you on the fees. If not, threaten to go to their competition. Don’t be hateful, I’m not encouraging you to start fights, but stand your ground and let them know you’re willing to pay someone else.[1]

2. Unplug the unused electronics (It’s not only an environmentally-friendly practice!)

Well, unplug all the electronics in your house. Did you know that if something is plugged in, regardless of whether or not it’s being used, it’s still sucking up energy and increasing your bills? So unplug your phone charger, the blender, the coffee machine, the TV, your computer charger…. you get the point. You’ll be amazed at what you start to save.

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3. Draft a list before you go shopping

Everyone knows to avoid grocery shopping when they’re hungry. It’s a sure way to buy way more than you intended, all because of your growling tummy. But the same thing happens when you don’t have a list/you don’t stick to your list. Plan ahead and stick to your shopping plan. More so, buy in bulk for cheaper prices and download some grocery store rebate apps on your phone!

4. Balance your checkbook

I know, I know, I sound like your parent. But balancing your checkbook is a great way to know how much money you actually have. Financial apps, like the one your bank no doubt offers, are great, but they aren’t always current to the minute. This can lead to hefty overdraft fees if you aren’t paying attention and spend more than you have. Seriously. Do it.[2]

5. Use cash before your card

The budget I created for myself involves reserving envelopes of cash for specific things. For instance, $200 specifically for groceries, $50 for restaurants/coffee shops and $25 for miscellaneous. I would only spend according to those envelopes, and if I ran out of cash, then I’ve spent all I can. Too bad. This is done in hopes of having a certain amount leftover at the end of the month to be put directly into my savings account. While it isn’t always realistic/smart/safe to carry around envelopes of cash, the idea is a good one. Really limit yourself to what you want to spend, and use cash before your card. There’s something about the feeling of handing over paper money that hurts a lot more than swiping some plastic.

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6. Bank on other people’s poor spending habits

You know that one friend you have who is always spending money on the latest trend and winds up with a box of stuff he/she no longer wears? Maybe they donate it as a tax write-off, or maybe they just throw it out. Tell them you want it instead! You’ll have a constantly changing wardrobe and it won’t cost you a dime! If you don’t have a friend like this, then buy used in general. Thrifting used to be taboo, but now second-hand is all the rage. eBay, Poshmark, ThreadUp and more are all great options to get new items for less.[3]

7. Get a programmable thermostat

This is one of those options that requires you to spend some money in order to save it, but for around $40, you can get a basic model and cut your energy bills by 15% ($45 a month!!). Some of these apps even sync to your phone, so you can adjust the temperature from anywhere. That’s a great feature for someone like me who constantly forgets to set it to 78* before leaving in the morning!

8. Pack your lunch

It can be so tempting to go to lunch nearby every day, especially if you work in the city. But have you ever calculated what you spend in a week on lunch or coffee? It’s sickening! If you go out to lunch 5 times a week, pack your lunch three times next week and see how much you save. You’ll be shocked and your bank account will thank you!

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So what do you think? Doable, right? I told you. Have other money-saving tips not mentioned here? Make sure to share!

Reference

More by this author

Heather Poole

Technical writer

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Last Updated on June 22, 2018

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider consolidating multiple credit cards if possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to pay the full balance you spent each month at the very least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay extra when you can – every small amount counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a plan on how to pay extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out costs for services you do not use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get aggressive about it

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate your progress at set intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start knocking out your debt today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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