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How Your Employer May Have Paid You Less Working Overtime

How Your Employer May Have Paid You Less Working Overtime

Overtime is a common practice in most job unfortunately; getting paid for it is usually not consistent. The first thing to keep in mind is that overtime is voluntary unless it is an emergency situation or an urgent attention.

That is the theory, but in reality we all know that if you repeatedly refuse to do overtime when the situation demands, you are most likely to be fired. If the company asks for an overtime, it is best to do them and if necessary demand the collection for an extra wage at the appropriate time.

How Bad Is Overtime for Us?

Disadvantages of overtime are usually aligned with health and un-productivity. below are some demerits of overtime your should know.

Exhaustion is a condition that you feel completely overwhelmed. It is often caused by stressful or excessive work, making you feel sick, tired and weak. According to a recent study by the Aragon Institute of Health Sciences, people who work more than 40 hours a week increase their risk of exhaustion six times compared to people who work less 35 hours per week.

But the question is, are employers really obligated to pay you for overtime and on what ground should you be paid for an overtime?

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How Is Overtime Paid?

Overtime is generated[1] when an employee exceed the standard working hour or time agreed. However, The remuneration of these extra hours can be made with money, days off or with the corresponding hours of rest pending on employer.

If it is with money, overtime must be reflected in the payroll and in no case can be paid with an amount less than the normal working hour. In fact, it is normal for the value of the overtime worked to be greater than the remuneration of an ordinary hour and more if those overtime hours were generated on a weekend or on a holiday.

When Must A Company Pay For Overtime Working?

During interviews,[2] employers do not inform potential employees of a need for overtime. However, the terms are often stated in the agreement papers or employment guide which most employee are not aware of.

The concept of non compliance with overtime far outweigh the consequences of not paying employees. Sometimes companies deliberately ignore employees right.

Below are some concepts your should know about overtime:

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1. When Your Employer Is Covered by the FLSA Law

If your employer is covered by the FLSA,[3] they are obligated to pay you for an overtime. However, If you fall into the “exempt” categories, you are not entitled for any payment. However, if your employer isn’t covered by the FLSA, you may be entitled to overtime under state law or otherwise.

2. When the Company’s Annual Income Meets the Specific Standard

Not all companies are eligible to pay employees for overtime. To determine if you are eligible first, determine whether it’s covered by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), and if it has $500,000 and above in annual sales and income. If not paying for overtime is at the companies discretion.

3. When You Are Asked to Report Duties Early

Sometimes employers may ask you to resume for duties early. However, most employees do not realize that starting before the appointed time could count as overtime. If this happens and you work on a clock system, you are entitled to extra payment.

Who Gets Paid For Overtime?

For employees working more than 40 hours a week are qualified to extra pay for the overtime hours. This is simple the standard as stated in the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, which requires the payment of overtime fro non-exempt employees.

Basically, there are two types of employees:[4]

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Non-Exempt Employees – 1.5 Times Regular Rates

Firstly, If you are employed as a non-exempt employee, then you are entitled to be paid a minimum of one and one-half times your regular rates of pay if your working hours exceed 40 hours in a week.

Exempt Employees – Obligated to Be Paid

If you were employed as an exempt personal then your company has a right to pay you for overtime at their discretion for engaging in overtime.[5] However, you are obligated to get paid for working overtime.

Anything to Do to Cope with Overtime?

There are times when overtime is not recommended. For example, if your employer made you do overtime on an earlier occasion and never acknowledge it. You must then demand for clear terms on working overtime.[6]

Accepting to work overtime should depends on many factors. It is advisable to analyze all the pros and cons of working longer hours for a company. If you see that it benefits you, do not hesitate to accept it.

Here are some helpful hints for accepting overtime.

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Establish a Relationship

There is nothing absolutely outstanding than a cordial relationship with your superior. Thus, to help you alleviate the burden that comes with overtime, develop a great relationship with your superior he or she could likely be a helping hand during overtime.

Analyze Company Practices

Each company has its own philosophy when it comes to schedules. When you join a company try to investigate the policies in the schedule so that you have full knowledge of the company’s practices.

Work from Home

There is always the possibility of taking work home, so you can avoid overtime. Try to reach an agreement with your company if this possibility is feasible.

Be Familiar with the FLSA Laws and Know Your Rights

Above all, be conversant with the FLSA Laws regarding employers and employees and you will be at the knowhow of your companies compliance regarding your rights.

Featured photo credit: Stocksnap via stocksnap.io

Reference

[1] UnitedStatesDepartmentOfLabor: Overtime Pay
[2] SiliconGap: Interview Using Body Language Spotting a Potential and Productive Fellow
[3] UnitedStatesDepartmentOfLabor: Handy Reference Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act
[4] TheBalance: The Difference Between an Exempt and a Non-exempt Employee
[5] OvertimeLawsInWashingtonState: How to Calculate Overtime Pay
[6] OfficeOfFinancialManagement: Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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