Advertising

Remember These 2 Rules When You Compliment Your Kids

Advertising
Remember These 2 Rules When You Compliment Your Kids

As a parent, you want your children to feel successful. Even more than that, you want your children to feel confident about who they are and who they can become. In your effort to promote healthy growth in your children, you may feel confused or overwhelmed about what to do. There is so much parenting advice out there and so many sources claiming to have all the answers regarding how to nurture healthy self-esteem and instill positive values. Fortunately, there are simple tips you can follow when complimenting your kids that will promote positive growth.

Reward Effort, Not Outcomes

Some kids express clear talents from an early age. They may have an ear for music, a head for numbers, or a passion for the arts. Other children’s gifts, however, are not as readily apparent, and they take time to discover and cultivate. As a result, it’s important to reward your children for their efforts and not for the outcome of their actions. If you focus too much on results, kids with a special talent will learn to coast and not push themselves. Children who are still developing their talents will worry that they can never measure up to their peers.

Advertising

Focusing on results sets kids up for a mindset of comparing themselves to others. They will learn that as long as they are performing better than the people or children around them, they don’t need to continue learning or growing. This mindset treats learning like an undesirable activity instead of a playful adventure. Since children naturally love to learn, it takes adult interference and over-emphasis on performance to dull their curiosity.

Advertising

Complimenting your children’s efforts instead of their performance will keep them engaged in the learning process and will ensure that they stay in a growth mindset. Children become less likely to judge each other or themselves when they make a mistake or don’t perform well. Kids with a growth mindset will look for ways to challenge themselves and improve for next time without the pressure to perform.

Advertising

Make Rewards Experiential, Not Material

As a busy parent, it may be tempting to buy your child a toy or reward him or her with some other material gift if he or she does something exceptional. A better alternative to using materialistic rewards is to reward your child with new experiences. Giving many material rewards keeps children in a materialistic mindset and sets them up to believe that getting new “stuff” is what life is all about.

Advertising

If you instead provide new experiences as a reward for good behavior, you will keep your children focused on a growth mindset. Experiences also provide children with an opportunity to interact with their parents, siblings, and friends. These shared experiences help cultivate joyful relationships and provide happy memories that will last a lifetime. Children learn that relationships and experiences are far more important than obtaining material possessions. They also learn that if they do well, they will be presented with even more opportunities to learn and grow. As a result, learning itself becomes a reward. Children who see learning as a reward are far more likely to learn on their own and pursue higher levels of education. They know that no material possession can match the feeling of excitement they experience when mastering a new skill or concept and sharing it with the people they love.

With our culture’s emphasis on material success, children need help navigating outside these shallow cultural values. Rewarding them materially will only reinforce the cultural message that “having lots of stuff” is what makes life valuable. In order to set kids up on a more authentic path of self-discovery, choose your words of praise wisely. Highlight your children’s efforts and show them that learning is a better reward than anything money can buy. That way, they will become confident adults who are eager to contribute to the world and to share their love of learning with generations to come.

Advertising

More by this author

Lindsay Shaffer

Lindsay is a passionate teacher and writer who shares thoughts and ideas that inspire people to follow their passions.

We Must All Face The Choice Between What Is Right And What Is Easy Psychology Explains Why Busy People Should Always Make Fun A Priority In Life Having a Mentor Doesn’t Mean You’re Not Smart Enough, It Actually Means the Opposite 10 Best Sites That Offer Gorgeous Free Images for Blogs How You Can Generate The Next Million Dollar Idea By Doodling On A Napkin

Trending in Parenting

1 How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades 2 50 Single Mom Quotes On Staying Strong And Loving 3 10 Things To Remember When You Feel Like a Failure as a Parent 4 Why Spending Time With Your Family Is Important (And How To Do So) 5 How to Talk to Teens And Have Real Conversations

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Advertising
How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

Advertising

You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

Advertising

3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

Advertising

6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

Read Next