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Want To Stop Procrastinating? You Should Fine Tune Your Mindset In This Way

Want To Stop Procrastinating? You Should Fine Tune Your Mindset In This Way

While procrastination is thought to be a prominent barrier to growth and long-term development, it can also have a debilitating impact on our everyday lives. After all, procrastination prevents individuals from completing tasks that must be done, whether they are important in their nature or regular, household chores such as ironing.

To understand the impact of procrastination further, let’s consider how such an outlook may be detrimental to your long-term finances. If you delay the repayment of monthly or ad-hoc bills, for example, you can quickly accumulate debts and create a scenarios where you are unable to claim credit in the future.

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How to Fine Tune Your Mindset and Avoid Procrastination

While the potential impact of procrastination is clear, the question that remains is how can such a mindset be avoided? The key to overcoming procrastination lies with initially understanding its triggers, before creating a solution that tackles this issue directly.

In many instances, procrastination is caused by the complexities of long-term planning and the way in which this can overwhelm the human mind. So even if you have clearly-defined goals, attempting to plot a long-term growth course and achieve your objectives over time can be extremely challenging.

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The obvious solution to this is to compartmentalize tasks and larger-scale projects into manageable portions, but your execution is key to ensuring that this is successful. You therefore need to chose a strategy that is easy to implement and capable of delivering measurable returns.

Why You Should Think Only in the Frame of 24 Hours

One strategy that should be recommended is to think only in the frame of 24 hours, as this is an excellent way of compartmentalizing goals and the individuals that are required to realize them. This not only negates the stress, anxiety and confusion that long-term planning can cause, but it also improves your daily productivity and ensures that objectives are easier to achieve.

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This strategy could not be easier to implement, either, regardless of the long-term goals that you are trying to achieve. Let’s say that you looking to lose a predetermined amount of weight in two months, for example, and want to create a plan that can drive success. Starting with the first 24 hours, you set the manageable goal of eating as healthily as possible and enjoying as much exercise as your schedules allows during this time.

You then repeat this process every day, adhering to the same basic objectives for the duration of the two months. At the end of each day you spend 10 minutes considering your priorities for tomorrow, while at no point do you think about the following day or the weeks ahead. In terms of measuring your progress, simply weigh yourself and mark down any losses that you have achieved each day in a journal.

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How to Implement This Strategy

When used correctly, this strategy can be extremely successful and enable you to create a wealth of positive habits. Its most important advantage is that it negates the often overwhelming nation of longer-term planning, helping you to maintain clearer thought processes and enhance your daily productivity. Above all else, it eradicates much of the pressure associated with goal setting and accomplishment, which can cause widespread procrastination and doubt.

In terms of implementing this strategy, you should remain true to its structure and maintain a rigid focus on each, 24-hour period. If you find that you are not achieving initial success, you should look to set more specific goals within each time period and create actionable steps rather than generic ones. This could enhance your daily productivity further, while also making it easier to complete everyday objectives.

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Last Updated on June 1, 2021

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy (And Need to Change That)

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy (And Need to Change That)

“Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

“Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

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The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

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If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

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6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

So, How To Get out of Busyness?

Take a look at this video:

And these articles to help you get unstuck:

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Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

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