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Want To Stop Procrastinating? You Should Fine Tune Your Mindset In This Way

Want To Stop Procrastinating? You Should Fine Tune Your Mindset In This Way

While procrastination is thought to be a prominent barrier to growth and long-term development, it can also have a debilitating impact on our everyday lives. After all, procrastination prevents individuals from completing tasks that must be done, whether they are important in their nature or regular, household chores such as ironing.

To understand the impact of procrastination further, let’s consider how such an outlook may be detrimental to your long-term finances. If you delay the repayment of monthly or ad-hoc bills, for example, you can quickly accumulate debts and create a scenarios where you are unable to claim credit in the future.

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How to Fine Tune Your Mindset and Avoid Procrastination

While the potential impact of procrastination is clear, the question that remains is how can such a mindset be avoided? The key to overcoming procrastination lies with initially understanding its triggers, before creating a solution that tackles this issue directly.

In many instances, procrastination is caused by the complexities of long-term planning and the way in which this can overwhelm the human mind. So even if you have clearly-defined goals, attempting to plot a long-term growth course and achieve your objectives over time can be extremely challenging.

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The obvious solution to this is to compartmentalize tasks and larger-scale projects into manageable portions, but your execution is key to ensuring that this is successful. You therefore need to chose a strategy that is easy to implement and capable of delivering measurable returns.

Why You Should Think Only in the Frame of 24 Hours

One strategy that should be recommended is to think only in the frame of 24 hours, as this is an excellent way of compartmentalizing goals and the individuals that are required to realize them. This not only negates the stress, anxiety and confusion that long-term planning can cause, but it also improves your daily productivity and ensures that objectives are easier to achieve.

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This strategy could not be easier to implement, either, regardless of the long-term goals that you are trying to achieve. Let’s say that you looking to lose a predetermined amount of weight in two months, for example, and want to create a plan that can drive success. Starting with the first 24 hours, you set the manageable goal of eating as healthily as possible and enjoying as much exercise as your schedules allows during this time.

You then repeat this process every day, adhering to the same basic objectives for the duration of the two months. At the end of each day you spend 10 minutes considering your priorities for tomorrow, while at no point do you think about the following day or the weeks ahead. In terms of measuring your progress, simply weigh yourself and mark down any losses that you have achieved each day in a journal.

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How to Implement This Strategy

When used correctly, this strategy can be extremely successful and enable you to create a wealth of positive habits. Its most important advantage is that it negates the often overwhelming nation of longer-term planning, helping you to maintain clearer thought processes and enhance your daily productivity. Above all else, it eradicates much of the pressure associated with goal setting and accomplishment, which can cause widespread procrastination and doubt.

In terms of implementing this strategy, you should remain true to its structure and maintain a rigid focus on each, 24-hour period. If you find that you are not achieving initial success, you should look to set more specific goals within each time period and create actionable steps rather than generic ones. This could enhance your daily productivity further, while also making it easier to complete everyday objectives.

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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