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5 Reasons Kids Should Aspire To Be Software Developers When They Grow Up

5 Reasons Kids Should Aspire To Be Software Developers When They Grow Up

As a kid growing up, you are always encouraged to follow your dreams. Practically every kid in the world at some point in their life dreams of being a doctor, lawyer, police officer, teacher, or even a firefighter. It’s almost as if our society has preconditioned kids to believe that the only way you can be successful in life is to have a job in public service. While I do believe that public service jobs can be very rewarding, these jobs are not the only pathways to success and children should be taught that early on in their lives.[1]

Technology has become a vital part of the educational system in America over the last ten years.[2] A recent study was conducted on students and the activities they engage in on a daily basis and the reports were astonishing. According to this groundbreaking study, students spend approximately 7 hours and 51 minutes per day utilizing technology in some capacity.[3]

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With this increase in technology usage, students are now suddenly introduced to both math, science, and technology in a new and revolutionary way that makes software development an even more popular career choice than in the years prior.

Why exactly should kids consider software development as a career choice? Here are a few reasons why:

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Your Job Will Always Evolve

Most people quit their jobs year after year because they don’t feel challenged when they go to work. While some may enjoy being stagnant in their roles, there are many individuals in the world who feel their career growth is directly attached to how challenged they feel. Having a job in software development not only guarantees challenges, but it also guarantees constant evolution because technology literally changes daily.

High Demand

Every single day a brand new application is born on the internet. Because applications are constantly being built, the number of software developers need to increase in order to maximize the demand. Jobs in software development are responsible for apps, websites, and a host of other products and services we use on a daily basis, making the industry visible and demanding in unprecedented ways.[4]

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The Pay is Good

As a kid growing up, many kids dreamed of being doctors because, well, the job paid well. While software developers may not make the same as some medical doctors, the salaries are impeccable. According to Glassdoor, the average software developer makes about 85,000 dollars a year.[5] The best part of the salary is that you don’t have to spend your entire life in college (or in debt, for that matter) in order to make money in this industry.

Potential Loan Forgiveness

One of the ongoing conversations across the country is the growing number of student loan debt. Because of a bill presented by President Obama, students now have the option to have their student loans forgiven if they work in public service.[6] Because technology is a necessity in a variety of industries, the potential for loan forgiveness is unlimited as a software developer. A software developer could be a teacher that teaches students how to code, a software developer for the local police department, or even the software developer at your local library. If you’ve somehow gotten yourself into an insurmountable amount of debt that you’re hoping to eliminate immediately after graduation, the opportunities are definitely endless.

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Job Security

Unemployment rates across the country continue to go up and down, leaving many professionals wondering if their jobs will be necessary in weeks, months, or even years into the future. As a software developer, you are not exempt from layoffs, however, statistics have proven that those in software development are less likely to become unemployed (and stay unemployed) than any other, making this industry a place for job security.

It doesn’t matter what industry you choose to work in, especially when you’re a kid still trying to figure your life out. However, every parent should echo one sentiment into their child’s life, and that is to encourage them to always follow their dreams.

Reference

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Stephanie Caudle

Content Creator

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Last Updated on August 14, 2020

How to Find a Career That Is Right For You

How to Find a Career That Is Right For You

There are thousands of careers to choose from. No wonder finding the one that’s right for you can feel like a guessing game.

Choosing or changing careers can be scary. Even if it’s right for you now, you might wonder, who says it’ll still be a fit in the future?

The truth is, you have to start somewhere. Whether you’re looking for a first job out of college or need a new career, follow this process to find the right one for you:

1. List Out Careers You Could Pursue

It sounds simple, but it’s good advice: Start with what you like. Even before you begin looking for the right career, you probably have an idea of what you’re interested in.

Next, make a second list, this one including your strengths. If you aren’t sure whether you’re actually good at something, ask someone close to you who’ll give you a truthful answer.

Once your lists are made, cross-reference them: What do you like to do and do well?

In a third list, rank these. If you’re skilled at something you don’t particularly like, for instance, that should fall lower on the list.

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2. Take a Career Assessment

Standardized tests shouldn’t make decisions for you, but they can get you pointed in the right direction. Career assessment tests gauge your abilities and interests and make recommendations for career paths based on the answers you give.[1]

Before reviewing your results, take a break. Getting some perspective can help you see whether your answers were guided by your mood. Look at the percentage match and ask yourself whether you could see yourself doing the work of the career or role every day.

For example, if your responses emphasized helping others, the test might point you to a medical career. However, if you don’t want to work in a hospital or clinical environment, you might cut that option or place it lower on your list.

3. Sweat the Details

Every career has gratifying and frustrating things about it. Before you choose one, you need to be clear on those. Reading reviews and job descriptions you find related to each career, make a list of its pros and cons.

There are a lot of factors to think through. Key questions to ask yourself include:

  • What are the hours required by this type of work? Can they be flexible?
  • What skills are required? Do I possess them, or would I be willing to learn them?
  • What are the education requirements? Can I afford to go back to school?
  • How much do jobs in the field pay? Is the payscale top-heavy or evenly distributed?
  • What does job growth in this sector look like? Are they traditional or contracted roles?
  • Are opportunities in the field available in my area? If not, would I be willing to move?
  • Would I be working solo or on a team?

In answering these questions, you’ll find yourself crossing a lot of careers off your list. Remember, that’s a good thing: You’d rather find out a career isn’t right for you now than after you’ve put yourself on that path.

4. Find the Sweet Spot

The crux of the career question is this: What’s the “sweet spot” between your interests and strengths and the market’s needs? The greater the overlap, the better.

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Be warned that you’ll have to compromise. Perhaps you enjoy working with animals, but there’s no demand for that line of work in your area. You might be good at math, but you wouldn’t want to crunch numbers in a cubicle for a living. Finding balance is crucial.

5. Start Networking

What’s the best way to get the real story about the careers you’re interested in? Talking to professionals in the field.

Where should you find these people?

  • Reach out to local businesses.
  • Scour your social media networks, particularly LinkedIn.
  • Ask a past employer for recommendations.
  • Sign up for industry events and conferences.

Schedule a short interview with each of your new connections. Ask them to weigh in on the comments you see online. Every role and company is a bit different, so don’t be surprised if their responses don’t align.

Regardless of who you find or what they say, write it down. If one interviewee’s responses differ wildly from online responses, chat with someone else in the field. Do your best to find out what’s the rule and what’s the exception.

6. Shadow and Volunteer

As valuable as networking can be, you need a firsthand glimpse of the work. If you hit it off with one of your interviewees, ask to do some job shadowing. Sitting beside someone as they work can help you understand not just the pay and the responsibilities but also the culture and work environment associated with each career.

Job shadowing is a good way to get your feet wet before taking a career plunge. If you felt uninterested or unhappy during your shadowing experience, it’s a good sign that you should ponder a different career path. If your shadowing experience made you want to come back for more, you may have found your calling.

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Volunteer work is an alternative to job shadowing that can get you the experience you need as you analyze your career options. As a volunteer, you can be more flexible with your time and get opportunities you wouldn’t find elsewhere.

7. Sign Up for Classes

Many careers have an academic component that you can’t ignore. If you decide you want to be a lawyer, for instance, you might want to know you can survive law school first.

Sign up for an introductory class or two related to each career you’re interested in. The earlier you do this, the better. If you’re still in college, the class will count as an elective and may be covered by your scholarship, but if not, look for a community college option to keep costs low.

Taking a single class is not the same as earning a degree in the field. With that said, it’s a good way to test the waters before you invest thousands of dollars.

If the content interests you and you look forward to class each week, that’s a good sign. If you start dreading the class or choose to drop it, focus your attention elsewhere.

8. Enter the Gig Economy

Contracted work is a great “try it before you buy it” career tactic. Skipping to an entry-level role requires more commitment than you might want to give while you’re still investigating your options. The gig economy offers the best of both worlds: paid work as well as flexibility.[2]

Gig workers take work from companies or individuals that do not directly employ them. Plumbers and artists are good examples. Rather than receiving a regular paycheck, they sell their services by the task or deliverable.

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In the gig economy, you aren’t bound by long-term agreements. If you don’t like the experience, you can simply move on.

You never know if you’ll enjoy something until you try it. And because contractors work with professionals in the field, gig workers naturally get networking and shadowing opportunities.

9. Market Yourself

As you zero in on your dream career, there’s one final test you can use to find out whether you’ll be successful: marketing yourself as a candidate for hire. Whether you get bites is a key indicator of how you’ll fare in the field.

Beware that, as someone without much experience in the field, you’re going to get a lot of rejections. Don’t be discouraged. If you get two interviews out of 50 applications, think of it as two opportunities you didn’t have before to find your ideal career.

Just as important as outreach is a good inbound strategy. Set up a website, and post your portfolio on it. Describe your dream job on your social media.

Recruiters are constantly on the lookout for candidates that fit their company. The more exposure you get, the more people will be interested in what you have to offer. Put yourself out there, and you just might find the perfect fit.

Don’t Give Up!

Nobody ever said it was easy to find a career that’s right for you. Finding one is tough enough, and even then, you may find yourself looking for a new field ten years into your career.

Whatever you want from your professional life, you have to be willing to put in the time. Don’t hesitate, and don’t give up. Start your search today.

More Tips on How to Find a Career

Featured photo credit: Saulo Mohana via unsplash.com

Reference

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