Advertising
Advertising

Tips for Shoring up your Finances in 2017

Tips for Shoring up your Finances in 2017

Von Goethe wrote, “Many people take no care of their money ’til they come nearly to the end of it …” The new year is time to create new resolutions and revisit old ones. One-quarter (25 percent) of Americans want to spend less and save more money as part of their resolutions, according to Nielsen. Unfortunately, far too many people break their promise of becoming more fiscally responsible. When it comes to your wallet, it’s key to be disciplined and have a good game plan. Here are ways to do just that and have a prosperous year.

  1. Measure your money.

As the saying goes, “What gets measured gets managed.” Create a budget and differentiate between your needs and wants. It’s key to know your disposable income so you’re clear about spending limits. Growing your bank account simply involves putting in more money than what you take out.

Moreover, you should be realistic when creating your budget and to remove non-essential items from your buying list. Non-essential spending usually arises from impulse shopping. It is comprised of things that don’t add much value to your life over the long-term and that end up as junk in your garage.

Advertising

  1. Pay on time and track your credit.

Paying bills on time will avoid negative reports on your profile as delinquencies will lower your score and increase your borrowing cost over the duration of the loan.

Most Americans want good credit. A 2016 Credit Confidence Study by Capital One found that 86 percent of respondents say they want to increase their credit score while 82 percent say they’re willing to do what it takes to improve their score. How does this metric improve your finances?

Your credit score affects your ability to get key loans such as car loan or home mortgage. Moreover, your credit profile impacts your borrowing costs and ability to pass a background check. Each year, you can access your credit report from the three major credit bureaus, as provided by federal law. There are free apps such as CreditWise that let you monitor your score without adverse consequences to your credit profile.

Advertising

    1. Leverage technology.

    Your smartphone is the gateway to discounts and perks offered by companies that want to attract your business. Consider downloading mobile apps offered by your favorite retailers to unlock savings and offers. For example, RetailMeNot and SlickDeals are all-in-one discount apps that hunt for deals from thousands of retailers. If you shop at big box stores like Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Target, and Best Buy (to name a few), their mobile apps have shopper-friendly features that let you compare prices and redeem vouchers, among other features, all from your mobile device.

    The key is stick to essentials. Level Money is an app that helps you track your key expenses and figure out what portion of your income you can responsibly spend.

    Advertising

    1. Digitize and be organized.

    A paper trail of receipts, warranty cards, and gift vouchers are a thing of the past. They’re inefficient and difficult to verify when damaged or lost. Consider using mobile wallet technology which digitizes your purchase information, account details, gift vouchers, and other records.

    Also, consider using scanning apps that let you use your smartphone’s camera to scan your paper receipts, coupons and other purchase information. Storing your data in digital format gives you peace of mind when records are damaged or misplaced.

    Most everyone wants to improve his or her finances. There’s a roadmap to get there that includes creating a reasonable budget, monitoring your credit profile, using technology to get discounts and offers, and organizing your wallet. The new year is time to shore up your finances!

    Advertising

    Featured photo credit: Photo credit: Flickr (commercial use & mods allowed) via flickr.com

    More by this author

    Marvin Dumont

    Entrepreneur, Disruptor

    Tips for Shoring up your Finances in 2017 5 Ways Technology Can Make Your Travel Stress-Free 5 Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Tips to Beat the Holiday Rush Five Myths that can Harm your Credit Score 5 Ways to Outsmart Hotels and Save Money

    Trending in Money

    1 How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years 2 Top 5 Spending Tracker Apps to Manage Your Budget Smart in 2019 3 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 4 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 5 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on April 3, 2019

    How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

    How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

    Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

    By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

    This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

    Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

    1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

    This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

    It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

    Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

    Advertising

    Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

    My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

    Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

    2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

    You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

    Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

    If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

    3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

    This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

    Advertising

    It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

    4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

    Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

    This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

    For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

    Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

    5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

    If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

    In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

    Advertising

    6. Get Aggressive About It

    Consider these points:

    Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

    Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

    Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

    Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

    7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

    Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

    By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

    Advertising

    Finally (and most importantly)…

    8. Keep Trying

    Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

    Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

    Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

    The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

    More Resources About Better Money Management

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

    Read Next