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4 Signs That People Have Stopped Growing Mentally When Getting Older

4 Signs That People Have Stopped Growing Mentally When Getting Older

Does everyone improve with age?

Just because someone has grown into middle or old age doesn’t mean that they have continued to grow as an individual.  It is easy to remain in one’s comfort zone and preferred ways of doing everyday tasks. This can cause unnecessary stress when someone is forced to experiment with new ways of working.

For example, a worker who is accustomed to carrying out their tasks in a certain way at work may become irritated or uncomfortable when someone suggests them to change the way they work.

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Signs that someone is stuck in their comfort zone

There are a few key signs to watch for that can help you discern whether you have become a little too entrenched in your comfort zone. You can also look out for these signs in your older co-workers and acquaintances.

1. They trust their own experiences more than anything else

Do you know someone who tends to overlook sensible potential solutions to a problem in favor of their extensive past experience? Of course, it is a good idea to reflect and learn from the past, but it is important to realize that the world is constantly changing and what worked well in the past may not apply to the present.

For example, a worker who has been working in marketing for several decades may overlook the potential of digital marketing in favor of more old-school print-based methods. This could be detrimental to the results of the company.

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2. They only focus on efficiency and overlook effectiveness

Older people who like to stay in their comfort zone may focus on how quickly they can complete a task, rather than the quality of the end result. For example, they may focus on crossing tasks off a do-to list rather than considering whether they have carried out each job to the best of their ability.

They may also be resistant to the suggestions of other people regarding how a particular job may be executed to a higher standard, especially if acting on these suggestions would entail making significant changes to the way they usually work.

3. They like doing repetitive and operational tasks

For a person who has become stuck in their comfort zone, repetitive and operational tasks requiring minimal creativity are more appealing than those that necessitate innovation.

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For instance, they may prefer tasks such as cleaning and keeping track of basic accounts to brainstorming new ideas or helping outline the aims of an exciting new project. Doing so helps them feel safe. In repeating the same tasks day after day, they create for themselves the illusion that nothing unexpected will come along and surprise them. This can minimize feelings of anxiety.

4. They tend to judge others rather focus on improving themselves

One of the key foundations for personal growth is the ability to channel one’s energies into self-improvement rather than passing judgment on what other people are doing. Those who want to go beyond their comfort zones know that the only way to better themselves is to take an honest ongoing inventory of their strengths and weaknesses.

People who are resistant to change typically find the prospect of self-examination daunting. Instead, they often spend their time looking for weakness in others and passing negative judgments. For instance, if a coworker tries a new method of working on a problem and does not immediately succeed, someone stuck in their comfort zone is likely to judge them harshly rather than praise them for their attempts at innovation.

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Conclusion

Knowing the signs that someone is stuck in their comfort zone can help both you and others to continue along the path of personal growth at all stages of life. Sometimes, a degree of self-awareness is all that is needed to get back on track and remain open to new ways of thinking and behaving.

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Jay Hill

Jay writes about communication and happiness on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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