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Designing the Superior Man: 15 Powerful Qualities (Part 3)

Designing the Superior Man: 15 Powerful Qualities (Part 3)

This is Part Three (of Three) describing 15 qualities of superior men. Each part will discuss 5 key qualities to embrace in order to design the superior man.

Read Part One here (Part 1).

Read Part Two here (Part 2).

The superior man is willing to take massive action, step out of have his comfort zone, and do whatever it takes to accomplish those things that have never been done before. Additionally, the superior man has the ability to separate how he feels from what he does, or even how he leads.

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Jim Collins describes how great leaders transform others in his best-selling book Good to Great. In his book, Collins discusses the Level 5 Leader.

Part Three is dedicated to those Level 5 Leaders in my life. To those who continue to inspire me to this day, even in death. I dedicate this post to those great men. These are the Level 5 Leaders and the key qualities they represent. They are truly superior men.

1. Puts things into perspective

“To lead people, walk behind them.” – Lao Tzu

Asking “did anyone die?” really puts things into perspective. A great leader in my life repeatedly solicits this question. It is amazing how this simple question completely puts things into proper perspective. This leader has the awesome ability to see through lesser men and is always able to put things into perspective.

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2. Lives the virtue of all virtues – humility

“Humility is not thinking less of yourself, but thinking of yourself less.” – C.S. Lewis

Humility may just be the most difficult quality in life. Yet, it is one of the most discussed and pursued qualities. One of the most important leaders in my life lives this quality better than anyone I know. He is the role model for role models. This superior man is someone we should all strive to become.

3. Not afraid to run into danger

“People say everything happens for a reason, so when I reach over and smack you in the face, remember… there was a reason.”

The superior man is one who is not afraid to run into danger. He is a man who confronts those things normal people refuse to. He is a man who recognizes that, if he does not run toward the enemy, no one will.

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A good friend of mine was killed protecting those he loved. He was killed because he was not afraid to fight. He was the type of man who runs toward danger when everyone else runs away.

4. Not afraid to stand alone

“A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” – Rosalynn Carter

The superior man is one who is not afraid to take a stand, even if he must stand alone. He is a man who recognizes that standing alone does not mean being alone. It means he is strong enough to stand for things; things that are right and just; things other men know are right, yet are afraid to stand for.

5. Chooses to live on a higher level

“When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. I believe I have made that effort and that is, therefore, why I will sleep for eternity.” – Nelson Mandela

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You can immediately tell when someone is good. They live and breathe on a higher level. Just being around the person lifts you up and inspires you. I met one of the greatest leaders to ever enter my life a couple years ago. I was only around this man for one year, yet he was the ultimate superior man.

The first time my wife met him, she was inspired. As a military spouse, she has seen all types of leaders. She holds the ability to immediately identify who is a good person and who is a bad person. This leader was not just good, but great.

Colonel Eugene L. Montague died in May 2016. This three-part series of superior men is dedicated to him. He is the ultimate superior man and I want to personally thank him for providing me the inspiration to keep learning, dreaming, and to one day become a leader he would be proud of.

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Dr. Jamie Schwandt

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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