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Feel Like Your Brain Not Working? It’s A Warning Sign That You Need To De-stress

Feel Like Your Brain Not Working? It’s A Warning Sign That You Need To De-stress

Have you ever sat down to complete a task or tried to focus at work and you felt so overwhelmed you just couldn’t get it together? Have you ever felt that your stress levels were at an all-time high and you felt like your mind is scattered and foggy? Have you ever felt constantly exhausted, irritable, distracted, and unhappy overall? Then you probably are suffering from something called brain fog.

The good news is you won’t suffer from this forever. There are many natural ways you can rid yourself of this debilitating condition and get yourself back to a happier you.

Symptoms of Brain Fog

  • Inability to focus
  • Processing information at a slower pace
  • Memory is poor
  • Feelings of grogginess and confusion
  • Anxiety

Keep in mind that brain fog typically tends to worsen when you are feeling stressed, worried, rushed and dealing with too much information at once. Here are 4 ways to de-stress and get rid of brain fog:

1. Get more sleep

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woman-sleeping-in-bed

    When suffering from brain fog, it may be difficult to shut your brain off at night. You may find yourself lying in bed for hours before finally drifting off to sleep, and when you do fall asleep, you may find that you’re unable to sleep through the night without waking up a few times.

    There are quite a few ways that you can unwind prior to getting into bed so you’re able to relax and fall asleep much easier. For example, if you start reading before bed, it sends a signal to your body and mind that it’s soon time to sleep. Or, if you take a warm bath before bed, your body recognizes that the day is coming to a close and it’s time to relax.

    Also, try listening to calming music in conjunction with some stretching and relaxation exercises. The whole point of having a pre-sleep routine is to prep your mind and body for sleep. Figure out when you want to be in bed by and then set aside 30-60 minutes for your pre-sleep time.

    2. Get moving

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    635924574014208042697820024_exercising

      When suffering from brain fog, your brain is unable to get the nutrients and oxygen that it needs to function properly. It boils down to a circulation issue, which can be caused by not getting enough exercise, or having a somewhat sedentary lifestyle. By getting regular exercise, your neural connections increase, and your hormones balance out. Numerous studies have shown that one of the most crucial things you can do for your brain is to get up and start moving around. When we find ourselves stuck in brain fog, we may want to just crawl into bed and sleep away our stresses.

      Get out and experience nature. Take a walk, ride a bike, and link up with a friend to join you. Having a workout buddy is a nice little trick to pick up a daily habit. The clarity you feel afterward will be such a relief.

      3. Keep a journal

      Woman writing in journal against tree in woods

        Keeping a journal is extremely beneficial for a number of reasons. You don’t need to just journal at the end of the day before bed. Carry it with you throughout the day. When you’re feeling overwhelmed, have a random thought that is bothering you, make a point to write it down, regardless of what time of day it is.

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        In addition, keep track of the foods you’re eating, your daily activities, and your sleep patterns. It may seem a little time consuming, but by the process of elimination, you may begin to notice a pattern that triggers your brain fog.

        Either way, sometimes the best way to get out your thoughts is to see them down on paper. Keeping thoughts in your head that cause you any type of mental and emotional discomfort is not healthy.

        4. Meditate

        meditation

          Meditation is good for the mind, body, and soul. When a person meditates, the body produces less of those so-called stress hormones, better known as cortisol and adrenaline and this increases the neurotransmitters. Regular meditation is one of the most powerful activities to improve overall health.

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          Start out practicing for five minutes a day until you’re able to practice for 20 to 30 minutes morning and evening. However, if you can’t dedicate that much time during your day, 10 minutes a day will make a significant difference.

          Stress can cause you to feel overwhelmed, depressed, and anxious. It can make getting out of bed almost unbearable some days. The good news is that there are many natural ways you can reduce your stress and regain control over your mental wellbeing.

          Using the above tips to get rid of brain fog reduces stress and helps us regain normal cognitive abilities like mental clarity, memory, and concentration. Get started today to get yourself back to a better and healthier you.

          More by this author

          Erica Wagner

          Freelance Writer

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          Last Updated on September 10, 2018

          Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

          Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

          We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

          Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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          Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

          Looking at images of loved ones

          While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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          In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

          Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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          Exercise

          Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

          Meditation

          Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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          In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

          When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

          With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

          Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

          Reference

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