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How to Remove a Tattoo at Home Quickly

How to Remove a Tattoo at Home Quickly

Choosing to get a tattoo removed is a big decision, but once the choice has been made, most people are itching to get the ink out of their skin as soon as they can. While it’s tempting to jump on the internet and start looking up how to remove a tattoo at home quickly, I caution you against that route.

Removing a tattoo at home is anything but quick and easy. It can often be painful and may even leave you more regret than your tattoo did in the first place.

Using Salabrasion/Dermabrasion To Remove Tattoos At Home

The internet is full of terrible suggestions. Ranging from dermabrasion, which literally sands away the unwanted pigmented skin, to using a salt mixture to heat up and scrape away your skin (salabrasion). If you were to attempt one of these DIY tattoo removal processes, you may or may not find that the tattoo is lightened or removed at the end of the healing process, but many people who attempt an at-home tattoo removal find that a scar is left in its place.

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One doctor goes as far as claiming these at home tattoo removal methods are the equivalent of throwing kerosene on your tattoo and lighting it on fire. For this exact reason, it is extremely important to consider your options and research the methods available to you before making a decision on how you want to have your tattoo removed.

I know that it’s tempting, but performing at home tattoo removal isn’t just slow and ineffective, it’s risky. Using dermabrasion or salabrasion to remove the top layer of your skin in a non-sterile environment can lead to infection and severe health concerns, especially if the area is large. To put things simply, you probably shouldn’t even be considering any tattoo removal method that utilizes salabrasion or dermabrasion.

Topical At-Home Tattoo Removal Methods

A few other options are left for people looking up how to remove a tattoo at home quickly, most of them topical remedies that are intended to lighten the tattoo using repeated applications of a cream, or other natural ingredients. While these are often safer than salabrasion or dermabrasion, they don’t usually provide the kind of complete removal effect that you are looking for.

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Creams marketed specifically for tattoo removal do exist, but many people experience adverse symptoms ranging from minor skin irritation to discoloring or even blistering of the skin after using these products. Other topical treatments involve chemical peels, but they aren’t any safer than the above-mentioned methods and can cause scarring as well.

All Natural Tattoo Removal methods

Other options for removing tattoos at home include applying lemon juice, honey or a mixture of aloe vera, paederia tomentosa, and vitamin E. These are much more natural remedies, but focus on gradually lightening of the whole area of skin and take a long time to show results. These are considered much safer options, but it’s unlikely you will be pleased with the results.

The Best Tattoo Removal Method

In order to get the best results with the least discomfort and lowest risk, I highly recommend seeking a professional laser tattoo removal service in your area. Laser tattoo removal is not only the safest method of removing tattoos, but it is also the fastest.

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Nonetheless, there are still a few very specific things you need to do before and after laser tattoo removal. A single session can last between 2 and 30 minutes, and most tattoos are completely removed within 3 to 6 sessions total. Tattoo removal shops have professionally trained medical staff, prepped with all of the necessary comforts to make the tattoo removal process quick and painless.

The Bottom Line

Once you have decided your reasons for removing a tattoo, it’s important to remember removing a tattoo at home quickly is simply not a realistic expectation. The quickest, safest, and by far most effective solution requires a visit with a professional.

At home tattoo removal methods are generally too risky and ultimately too ineffective to consider them a realistic solution. If you have time and are strapped for cash, it doesn’t hurt to do further research on natural remedies that are proven safe, but temper your expectations.

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If you want your tattoo removed quickly and with the least amount of risk, you require professional laser tattoo removal. Whatever method you choose to pursue, please perform additional research and do what you can to minimize the risk of burning and scarring.

Featured photo credit: boymeetsfashion.com via boymeetsfashion.com

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Breslin Borland

Part time blogger, full time space pirate

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Last Updated on October 23, 2018

Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

My mother was a great knitter and produced some wonderful garments such as Aran sweaters which were extremely fashionable when I was young. She also knitted while my father drove, which caused great amusement. I often wondered why she did that but I think I know the answer now.

Knitting is good for your mental health, according to some research studies. The Washington Post mentions a 2013 survey of about 3,500 knitters who were asked how they felt after a knitting session. Over 80% of them said they definitely felt happier. It is not a totally female occupation as more and more men take it up to get the same benefits. Harry Styles (One Direction) enjoys knitting. So does Russell Crowe although he does it to help him with anger management!

The Neural Knitwork Project

In Australia, Neural Knitworks was started to encourage people to knit and also become aware of neuroscience and mental health issues. Knit-ins were organized but garments were not the only things created. The knitters produced handmade neurons (1,665 of them!) to make a giant brain. The 2015 project will make more neural knitted networks (neural knitworks) and they will be visible online. You can see some more examples of woolly neurons on the Neural Knitworks Facebook page.

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While people knitted, crocheted and crafted yarn, they listened to experts talking about mental health issues such as addiction, dementia, depression, and how neurons work.

The knitting and neural connection

The human brain has about 80 billion neurons. Learning new skills, social interaction, and physical activity all help to forge neural connections which keep the brain healthy and active. They are creating networks to control movement and make memories. The knitters learn that as they create the woollen neurons, their own neurons are forming new pathways in their brains. Their creations are mimicking the processes in their brains to a certain extent. At the same time, their brains are registering new and interesting information as they learn interesting facts about the brain and how it works. I love the knitworks and networks pun. What a brilliant idea!

More mental health benefits from knitting

Betsan Corkhill is a physiotherapist and has published some results of completed studies on her website, appropriately named Stitchlinks. She conducted some experiments herself and found that knitting was really helpful in reducing panic and anxiety attacks.

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“You are using up an awful lot of brain capacity to perform a coordinated series of movements. The more capacity you take up by being involved in a complex task, the less capacity you have for bad thoughts.”- Betsan Corkhill

Knitters feel happier and in a better mood

Ann Futterman-Collier, Well Being Lab at Northern Arizona University, is very interested in how textile therapy (sewing, knitting, weaving and lace-making) can play an important role in mood repair and in lifting depressive states.

She researched 60 women and divided them into three different groups to do some writing, meditating and work with textiles. She monitored their heartbeat, blood pressure and saliva production. The women in the textiles group had the best results when their mood was assessed afterwards. They were in a better mood and had managed to reduce their negative thoughts better than those in the writing and meditation groups.

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“People who were given the task to make something actually had less of an inflammatory response in the face of a ‘stressor’.” – Dr. Futterman Collier

The dopamine effect on our happiness

Our brains produce a chemical called dopamine. This helps us to feel happy, more motivated, and assists also with focus and concentration. We get a boost of dopamine after sex, food, exercise, sleep, and creative activities.

There are medications to increase dopamine but there are lots of ways we can do it naturally. Textile therapy and crafting are the easiest and cheapest. We can create something and then admire it. In addition, this allows for a little bit of praise and congratulations. Although this is likely not your goal, all these can boost our dopamine and we just feel happier and more fulfilled. These are essential in facing new challenges and coping with disappointment in life.

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“Sometimes, people come up to me when I am knitting and they say things like, “Oh, I wish I could knit, but I’m just not the kind of person who can sit and waste time like that.” How can knitting be wasting time? First, I never just knit; I knit and think, knit and listen, knit and watch. Second, you aren’t wasting time if you get a useful or beautiful object at the end of it.” – Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit’s End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much.

If you thought knitting and textiles were for old ladies, think again!

Featured photo credit: DSC_0012/Mary-Frances Main via flickr.com

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