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Changing Expectations: What Millennials Now Look For in a Career

Changing Expectations: What Millennials Now Look For in a Career

Members of older generations have had a lot to say about millennials, and millennials have provided them with plenty of rebuttals. From the older generation’s corner, accusations of laziness and entitlement fly, while millennials insist that poor economic conditions and inflation have made success nearly impossible for their generation. But neither of these perspectives focuses on the positive changes millennials have brought to the workforce, and to the world. In reality, an incredibly positive revolution is happening just below the surface – and while millennials are getting flack now, they are simultaneously paving the way for a more innovative career culture in the future.

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One of the common reasons older generations view millennials as fickle and lacking in dedication is because they are much less likely to stick with one employer throughout their lives. In fact, a 2008 study showed that 75% of millennial participants expected to have between 2 and 5 employers in their lifetime. In a more recent assessment, more than one-quarter of millennials said they expected to have 6 employers or more.

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From the surface, this might appear fickle – why so much change? But one can also interpret this trend as enhanced focus, rather than a lack thereof. Millennials are well-aware of when they outgrow a position, and will quickly move along to a new role that better suits them. Also, millennials are the most underemployed generation, struggling in jobs that don’t pay the bills and that fall far below their level of expertise. In this case, continued career upgrades are not only smart but financially necessary – especially for those that plan to get married and have children.

Brands With Values

Gone are the days when corporations could act on questionable ethics and get away with it. Nowadays, corporate scandals go straight to social media, sometimes even going viral within hours. Millennials strive for careers with “purpose,” not ones in which they will be spinning their wheels or making unethical decisions just to avoid being fired. In a Brand Amplitude poll, 75% of millennials claimed businesses should impact society in a positive way, along with creating jobs and profit. Thus, millennials have taken a special interest in social enterprise and sustainable business.

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Not only are millennials doing things differently, but they are also more numerous, intensifying their impact on modern businesses. According to a report by PwC, “Millennials make up 25% of the workforce in the US and account for over half of the population in India. By 2020, millennials will form 50% of the global workforce.” For this reason, companies who are hiring millennials would be wise to have strong brand values, and most importantly, ensure that they embody those values in their actions.

Personal Development

Millennials are an individualistic generation, valuing personal growth and skill-building over job security. They are not tied to the idea of obtaining a fixed, specific role – such as becoming an accountant at a top bank. Rather, they are interested in finding a job that fits them. Perhaps this is why one poll found that “71% of American adults think of millennials as “selfish.” But does making work-life balance a priority equate to selfishness? Or rather, is it an indication that millennials have standards and goals for how they want to live their lives?

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Offering opportunities to learn, grow, and experience new things is another smart choice for modern companies that want to attract and retain millennials. A Business Insider survey showed that nearly 20% of millennials polled named Google as their ideal employer – a higher percentage than both Apple (13%) and Facebook (9%). It is no coincidence that Google offers paid maternity leave for parents, tuition reimbursement, and paid vacation. Thus millennials have clearly indicated that they are willing to be productive and dedicated to a company that helps them achieve work-life balance.

Dubbed “creative disrupters” in a 2015 Bank of America study, millennial influence is expected to grow as other generations diminish. The challenge for millennials will be to manage technology without letting it overtake them, along with managing the stress that inevitably comes with a technology-driven, fast-paced work environment.

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Featured photo credit: Flickr | ITU Pictures via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager (2018 – present)

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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