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4 Things You can Do to Turn Your Kids Into High Achievers

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4 Things You can Do to Turn Your Kids Into High Achievers

I recently talked to a friend who’s raising a boy about different parenting methods and he said that he doesn’t give the whole thing much thought; after all, his parents let him bang his head all he wanted and he turned out to be just fine.

That is true and he is quite a character, but I disagree with his ignorance regarding parenting. Although you shouldn’t keep your kid under a glass bell and prevent them from experience the good and the bad in the world, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t guide them towards a concrete goal – to make your children high achievers.

Raising my girl has so far been a very rich experience for me and I expect nothing less than that in the future. She showed various talents and aspirations and I’m very satisfied with where she’s headed, which is why I’d like to share several things I have learned so far.

1. An Early Start

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    It’s never too early to start this process. Some parents neglect their careers in order to devote their full time and attention to raising a high achiever and I believe this is a mistake – the fact that you have a child doesn’t mean you should stop being a complete person.

    A very important thing here is balance. Investing everything you have in your child’s future will put a lot of pressure on them and that is a ticking time bomb waiting to explode sooner or later. It is possible to mold a brilliant mind without it snapping.

    So, keep your career, don’t put all the weight of the world on your child’s back, but do pay close attention to their development by keeping track of affinities they manifest during all kinds of activities like precise coloring, extra developed motor skills, etc. That way, your kid will be aware of their capacities very early, which is a major confidence boost, and confidence plays a very important role in molding your child into a high achiever.

    2. Creative Upbringing Methods

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      Most parents present themselves as an authority figure and they never leave that position. If you consider doing this, you should know that “Because I said so” won’t work forever. In fact, you can be sure that it will cause rebellion at an early age and there’s very little you can do about that in case you don’t change.

      No, you shouldn’t be just friends with your child because they do need a guide, but you can be a parent/friend, which I believe is a perfect balance. As soon as your child starts talking and their sentences start to make sense, everything you two do together should be a matter of agreement. If you want them to clean their room, explain why that is necessary – that simple.

      Also, the old reward/punishment system should be upgraded a bit, because it’s not all black and white in parenting. Naturally, you should teach your child that bad actions have their consequences and that being helpful and productive has its reward, but there’s so much more to parenting than this.

      3. Learning Is Fun

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      I love to read

        Which brings me to my next point – you can and should indulge your child’s curiosity. Allow them to try as many things possible and enable them to discover the world by themselves and experience as much as possible – with your supervision, obviously. Children’s minds are like sponges and they gather absolutely everything they see, feel, smell, taste and touch.

        Acting this way and introducing them to the world in this manner will enable them to lower confusion levels maximally, boost their confidence even more and help them develop resourcefulness, which is a magnificently useful tool to have.

        You should also explore the meaning of a growth mindset and try to plant this kind of approach into your child’s mind, because it will enable them to look at problems as a challenge that requires a unique solution and not as something that causes anxiety and frustration.

        4. Freedom of Choice

        This is a part I’d like to emphasize because it is a common mistake a lot of parents out there make. You must have had daydreams about what you want your child to be when he or she grows up, but you should make peace with the fact that they are not an extension of you that exists to fulfill your long-lost aspirations.

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        It would be nice if your child actually turns out to be a healthcare expert who invents a medicine, an extremely talented dancer who charms the whole world with the elegance of movement or a legend of football who will go right down in history. A truly successful high achiever needs to do what they actually enjoy doing.

        The bottom line is that you want your child to be happy, so don’t forget to enable them to have a careless childhood and this is something that slips parents’ minds very often. Basically, you should introduce discipline and hard work without presenting them as must-do obligations and shower them with affection and support whenever possible – this is a balance you need to strive towards.

        Featured photo credit: https://unsplash.com/photos/ZSrgSSGJiQs via pexels.com

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        Ivan Dimitrijevic

        Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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        Last Updated on January 5, 2022

        How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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        How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

        Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

        What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

        When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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        You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

        1. Help them set targets

        Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

        2. Preparation is key

        At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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        3. Teach them to mark important dates

        You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

        4. Schedule regular study time

        Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

        5. Get help

        Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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        6. Schedule some “downtime”

        Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

        7. Reward your child

        If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

        Conclusion

        You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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        Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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