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Don’t Feel Hurt When Others Say “You’re Weird”, Take It As A Compliment Instead

Don’t Feel Hurt When Others Say “You’re Weird”, Take It As A Compliment Instead

Have you ever been called “weird?”  What exactly does that mean?

Usually when someone refers to you as weird, it conjures up negative feelings. You are being told that you are odd, different and that you don’t fit the conventional norms of the day. We are taught early in life that being different is social suicide and going off the quintessential “beaten path” is choosing a life of solitude and ridicule.

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I’ve been blessed to have worn the “weird” label my whole life. And the truth is–I am weird. I have weird views on life, finances and romance. I march to the beat of my own drum and forge my own paths where none previously existed. In short, I am extremely proud and honored to be called “weird.”

“So you’re a little weird? Work it! A little different? OWN it! Better to be a nerd than one of the herd!”~Mandy Hale

Society has conditioned us to be conformist. When you are called weird instead of hearing an insult, you should understand that you have just been paid one of the highest compliments. You have just been told that you are unique, bold, daring, exceptional, authentic and that you are special. Weird people think differently and choose to respond to the world around them differently – they own their individuality. It takes courage to go against the grain and to choose a distinct path in life.

Weird people are divergent thinkers

Being able to see the world, problems and situations from a perspective that is unique from the masses is truly a gift. When you are younger it does cause you a lot of problems. As a child, I’m guessing that your inquisitiveness – like mine – was mistakenly viewed as being obstinate, and difficult and efforts were made to quickly stamp out that “perverse” thinking before it could infect the others. In school, unfortunately we are taught what to think and not how to think for ourselves.

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Divergent thinkers are the ones who change the world. Throughout history, most of our true heroes had views that were directly opposed to the popular opinion of their day. They stood – many times alone – and championed their cause with or without help from others. Being able to see the world through a different set of lenses enables you a unique vantage point and the ability to attack problems and issues in away that no one else can. Your one weird idea could be the catalyst for change this world needs – don’t be tricked into conforming.

Being Weird is a superpower

The ability to own being weird gives you the power to accept the dare. The world throws so much at us and many times ordinary people live ordinary lives because they do not dare rise to the challenge. And this doesn’t mean (although it could) solving world hunger or putting an end to violence forever. Daring behavior shows up in our day-to-day thinking about small things. It is displayed in how we think and respond to political decisions, how we raise our children or how we make financial decisions.

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My husband and I were married very young and we decided that we wanted to live a life without debt or with very little debt. So our first small step was the decision not to use credit cards to make any purchases. When we shared our new endeavor with our loved ones we were patted on the head and told that it was an impossible and very impractical way to live. We were informed that you HAD to have a credit card to travel, rent cars and conduct certain types of business–no two ways about it–it just wasn’t doable in today’s society. My husband and I listened carefully to the advice of our well meaning friends and family and we quietly accepted the dare.

Twenty years later we are still credit card free, have traveled all over the world and rent cars regularly. The most phenomenal part about the whole process is the dare taught us how to be fiscally responsible, set us up for a very early retirement, helped my husband choose his career (he’s an accountant) and given us the ability to counsel others financially. The genesis of our financial success began with a simple dare.

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Denise Hill

Speech Writer/Senior Editor

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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