Advertising
Advertising

Don’t Feel Hurt When Others Say “You’re Weird”, Take It As A Compliment Instead

Don’t Feel Hurt When Others Say “You’re Weird”, Take It As A Compliment Instead

Have you ever been called “weird?”  What exactly does that mean?

Usually when someone refers to you as weird, it conjures up negative feelings. You are being told that you are odd, different and that you don’t fit the conventional norms of the day. We are taught early in life that being different is social suicide and going off the quintessential “beaten path” is choosing a life of solitude and ridicule.

Advertising

I’ve been blessed to have worn the “weird” label my whole life. And the truth is–I am weird. I have weird views on life, finances and romance. I march to the beat of my own drum and forge my own paths where none previously existed. In short, I am extremely proud and honored to be called “weird.”

“So you’re a little weird? Work it! A little different? OWN it! Better to be a nerd than one of the herd!”~Mandy Hale

Society has conditioned us to be conformist. When you are called weird instead of hearing an insult, you should understand that you have just been paid one of the highest compliments. You have just been told that you are unique, bold, daring, exceptional, authentic and that you are special. Weird people think differently and choose to respond to the world around them differently – they own their individuality. It takes courage to go against the grain and to choose a distinct path in life.

Weird people are divergent thinkers

Being able to see the world, problems and situations from a perspective that is unique from the masses is truly a gift. When you are younger it does cause you a lot of problems. As a child, I’m guessing that your inquisitiveness – like mine – was mistakenly viewed as being obstinate, and difficult and efforts were made to quickly stamp out that “perverse” thinking before it could infect the others. In school, unfortunately we are taught what to think and not how to think for ourselves.

Advertising

Divergent thinkers are the ones who change the world. Throughout history, most of our true heroes had views that were directly opposed to the popular opinion of their day. They stood – many times alone – and championed their cause with or without help from others. Being able to see the world through a different set of lenses enables you a unique vantage point and the ability to attack problems and issues in away that no one else can. Your one weird idea could be the catalyst for change this world needs – don’t be tricked into conforming.

Being Weird is a superpower

The ability to own being weird gives you the power to accept the dare. The world throws so much at us and many times ordinary people live ordinary lives because they do not dare rise to the challenge. And this doesn’t mean (although it could) solving world hunger or putting an end to violence forever. Daring behavior shows up in our day-to-day thinking about small things. It is displayed in how we think and respond to political decisions, how we raise our children or how we make financial decisions.

Advertising

My husband and I were married very young and we decided that we wanted to live a life without debt or with very little debt. So our first small step was the decision not to use credit cards to make any purchases. When we shared our new endeavor with our loved ones we were patted on the head and told that it was an impossible and very impractical way to live. We were informed that you HAD to have a credit card to travel, rent cars and conduct certain types of business–no two ways about it–it just wasn’t doable in today’s society. My husband and I listened carefully to the advice of our well meaning friends and family and we quietly accepted the dare.

Twenty years later we are still credit card free, have traveled all over the world and rent cars regularly. The most phenomenal part about the whole process is the dare taught us how to be fiscally responsible, set us up for a very early retirement, helped my husband choose his career (he’s an accountant) and given us the ability to counsel others financially. The genesis of our financial success began with a simple dare.

Advertising

More by this author

Denise Hill

Denise shares about psychology and communication tips on Lifehack.

3 Reminders to Help You Enjoy Life Even When Life Is Tough 20 Simple Ways to Bring Positive Energy into Life Right Now Why It’s Never Too Late To Redefine Yourself 30 Best Business Podcasts That Help Entrepreneurs Become Successful Day 10 Shocking! Exercise Right After Eating Ain’t That Bad for Health

Trending in Communication

1 12 Things That Will Always Motivate You to Do a Good Job 2 Need a Mood Booster? Here Are 5 Ways to Get Happier in 1 Minute 3 5 Ways to Help Yourself Advance Your Mental Strength 4 How to Use the Wheel of Life to Live the Life You Want 5 9 Reasons Why a Social Media Detox Is Good for You

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on October 6, 2020

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

And if you want to know the difference between an arrogant person and a confident person, watch this video first:

 

1. They don’t make excuses.

Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy at work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses like “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

Advertising

2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone, because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort, because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

4. They don’t put things off until next week.

Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today – because that’s where progress happens.

5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

Advertising

6. They don’t judge people.

Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

8. They don’t make comparisons.

Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

Advertising

10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their life, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like a detective, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

Advertising

14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to Plan A. They make use of any and all weapons that are at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach, until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

15. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth” without thinking about it.

Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so”. They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives, and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

Read Next