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8 Times Your Mom Was Right And You Can’t Deny Them Now

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8 Times Your Mom Was Right And You Can’t Deny Them Now

You remember the days when you thought you knew it all and your mother was nothing but a nag. Don’t get me wrong, you loved her, but she needed to get off your back. She’d just always carry on these longwinded, nonsense conversations, clearly not understanding you at all… And then one day, you grow up, and realize she was right all along.

1. “You Can Make a Meal Out of Anything”

Money was tight growing up, so we had a lot of ‘concoctions’, as my mother called them. 20 years later, my sister and I still make fun of this one meal in particular that she made. A curious mixture of things to say the least! All I can recall is an orange broth, dumplings and corn mixed together. Although it appeared totally gross, my mom insisted her concoctions were still worthy of being a good meal. She was right though, it was good enough to fill our belly. Now that I’m a busy mom of four, I find myself making a lot of concoctions from leftovers too.

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2. “The Older You Get, the Less You Care”

We all remember those periods of our lives, especially during our teenage and high school years, when everything seemed so important and so significant. We were young and didn’t experience life enough yet to know what really mattered most. My mom would always tell me, “the older you get, the less you care.” That advice didn’t matter much to me then. I was 15 years old, and the way that girl looked at me was a huge deal! Sure, I can laugh about it now… Now that I’m old enough to know that mom was right; I don’t care about that dumb stuff anymore.

3. “Learning to Swim Is Good for You”

When I was younger, our public pool gave free swim lessons, and my mom wasn’t going to pass up the opportunity for us to learn how to swim (especially since it was free!). I admit it though, I hated to swim. I was afraid of the water, and yes, I was one of “those” kids. I managed to have a mysterious stomachache every morning before lessons. I would never let go of the side of the pool. Put my head under water?! Umm… No way! Luckily, my mother didn’t fall for my fake illness and made me take the lessons anyways. It’s what mom’s do to help keep us safe.

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4. “Hold the Door”

Like most moms, my mother taught us to be polite, use our manners, and say “hello”. She was big on little gestures of kindness. If another vehicle on the road let me turn first, I should wave a ‘thank you.’ If someone was walking out behind me, I should always hold the door. Sometimes it’s the little things that matter.

5. “Change Your Socks and Underwear”

Let’s face it; kids don’t give a darn about dirty clothes. They will go days on end in the same clothes, and it won’t even occur to them until mom starts yelling about it. Good hygiene is an essential part of life, so I can’t image where I’d be right now without all the longwinded lectures about it. Dirty underwear when I went into labor? No thank you! How about the time I injured my calf at the gym and the hunky instructor came over to inspect what could have been an unshaved leg?! Yes, you were right mom. Thank you for the good hygiene lectures.

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6. “We Didn’t Have Much, but We Survived”

Sure, we had a family car to get around in, but it wasn’t one us kids would want to be seen in. Yeah, I had new clothes; new from the thrift store. My siblings and I had bicycles, but my brother’s was a pink ‘Huffy’. We owned our own house, but not one I’d want the kids on the school bus to see me being picked up in front of. Now that all us kids are adults, we can look back on my mom’s famous words, “we didn’t have much, but we survived,” and be grateful for how that helped mold us into who we are. Children and teens worry about materialistic things. Adults worry about family, love, and experiencing life.

7. “Don’t Judge Others”

“Kids will be kids”, they say. Sad but true, they have ‘cliques’. They tease. They bully. And yes, I was a culprit of it at some point. I think we all were. As the saying goes through, “don’t judge someone until you’ve walked in their shoes.” Mom always made sure we were open to and accepting of others.

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8. “Hard Work Will Pay Off”

Kids only see a mean mom that yells all the time. She’s too strict and bedtimes are dumb. Mom’s always nag about doing chores and getting homework done. However, schedules, deadlines, routines, and hard work are necessary to succeed in the adult world. Mom wasn’t being a nag; she was setting a strong foundation for our future. Moms just want us to be smart and make good, healthy decisions.

It usually takes us becoming adults or parents ourselves before we see the true meaning behind our mother’s teachings. We may not see it as children, but as adults, we are thankful for it!

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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