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Typical Day of A Minimalist vs A Maximalist

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Typical Day of A Minimalist vs A Maximalist

“As much as we like our stuff, they really aren’t a part of us,” said Thomas Gilovich, a Cornell University psychology professor. A minimalist defines themselves according to their experiences rather than what they own. As Gilovich describes:

“Arguably, we are the sum total of our experiences. It’s almost like building up a resume by virtue of the things that you did.”

Minimalist vs. Maximalist in Daily Life

When they get up

When they get up

    Tidying up the bed usually has been becoming a habit for a minimalist.

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    When they’re preparing to go out

    When they’re preparing to go out

      A minimalist puts a simple makeup when they prepare to go out.

      When they cook

      When they cook

        When they cook, minimalist tends to keep the kitchen environment clean and neat.

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        When they use the computer

        When they use the computer

          A minimalist keeps their pc desktop neat. They love neatness, anyway.

          When they take rest

          When they take rest

            When they need to search for items they need

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            When they need to search for items they need

              Since minimalist people usually have a neat home and put things back at the right place, they tend to get the item they need easily when they’re looking for it.

              When they’re working

              When they’re working

                Minimalist people also keep their work environment neat.

                The Advantage of Valuing Experiences Over Material Possessions

                Gilovich has dedicated himself to the study of happiness and how it is connected to experience and possessions for more than a decade. He said, there are three central reasons why doing something brings about more satisfaction and feeling of fulfillment than owning something: what we experience forms part of our identity; when we experience things, we connect socially with others; and there is no jealousy connected with experiences whereas there is often envy when it comes to others material things.

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                Material Things Are Not Memories

                People who have not yet become minimalists often believe that things represent memories. They confuse material possessions with what they recall and value.

                “We hold onto these things because we think they’re going to be useful in some hypothetical future that doesn’t actually exist,” Millburn said. “We hold onto almost everything just in case we might need it some day. I learned that the memories aren’t in things either. That’s why I was holding onto so many things because I thought the memories were in those things, but they weren’t.”

                The minimalist knows that memories are part of us and our thoughts and are not contained in material things.

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                Rebecca Beris

                Rebecca is a wellness and lifestyle writer at Lifehack.

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                Last Updated on August 12, 2021

                Learn How To Make Coffee 38 Different Ways With This Stunning Guide

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                Learn How To Make Coffee 38 Different Ways With This Stunning Guide

                 

                If you make your own coffee in the morning, chances are you’re only making the same boring kind everyday. Now it’s time to put an end to the cynical habit and turn you into an instant coffee connoisseur.

                For those who don’t know, there are officially 38 different ways to make coffee. All, except decaffeinated versions will give you the same buzz that can either make you extremely productive or give you anxiety.

                The only difference here is taste. And when it comes to coffee, taste matters. A lot.

                Most of the methods and ingredients from the chart above dates back hundreds of years and have been traditionally passed down from generation to generation. Hence, it’s actually possible to tell where a person came from based on the type of coffee he or she drinks!

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                  38 ways to make a perfect Coffee | Visual.ly

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