Advertising
Advertising

Typical Day of A Minimalist vs A Maximalist

Typical Day of A Minimalist vs A Maximalist

“As much as we like our stuff, they really aren’t a part of us,” said Thomas Gilovich, a Cornell University psychology professor. A minimalist defines themselves according to their experiences rather than what they own. As Gilovich describes:

“Arguably, we are the sum total of our experiences. It’s almost like building up a resume by virtue of the things that you did.”

Minimalist vs. Maximalist in Daily Life

When they get up

When they get up

    Tidying up the bed usually has been becoming a habit for a minimalist.

    Advertising

    When they’re preparing to go out

    When they’re preparing to go out

      A minimalist puts a simple makeup when they prepare to go out.

      When they cook

      When they cook

        When they cook, minimalist tends to keep the kitchen environment clean and neat.

        Advertising

        When they use the computer

        When they use the computer

          A minimalist keeps their pc desktop neat. They love neatness, anyway.

          When they take rest

          When they take rest

            When they need to search for items they need

            Advertising

            When they need to search for items they need

              Since minimalist people usually have a neat home and put things back at the right place, they tend to get the item they need easily when they’re looking for it.

              When they’re working

              When they’re working

                Minimalist people also keep their work environment neat.

                The Advantage of Valuing Experiences Over Material Possessions

                Gilovich has dedicated himself to the study of happiness and how it is connected to experience and possessions for more than a decade. He said, there are three central reasons why doing something brings about more satisfaction and feeling of fulfillment than owning something: what we experience forms part of our identity; when we experience things, we connect socially with others; and there is no jealousy connected with experiences whereas there is often envy when it comes to others material things.

                Advertising

                Material Things Are Not Memories

                People who have not yet become minimalists often believe that things represent memories. They confuse material possessions with what they recall and value.

                “We hold onto these things because we think they’re going to be useful in some hypothetical future that doesn’t actually exist,” Millburn said. “We hold onto almost everything just in case we might need it some day. I learned that the memories aren’t in things either. That’s why I was holding onto so many things because I thought the memories were in those things, but they weren’t.”

                The minimalist knows that memories are part of us and our thoughts and are not contained in material things.

                More by this author

                Rebecca Beris

                Rebecca is a wellness and lifestyle writer at Lifehack.

                Which Is Better: Morning Workout Or Evening Workout? Why Your Habits Hinder You From Reaching Your Goals Science Says Silence Is Much More Important To Our Brains Than We Think 16 Unhealthy Habits You Should Get Rid Of By 35 Years Old How To Get Rid Of A Headache Without Medicine

                Trending in Lifestyle

                1 Is Caffeine Bad For You (And How Much Caffeine Is Too Much)? 2 10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively 3 3 Simple Steps to Reduce Your Gut Inflammation 4 What Helps Yeast Infections: Foods To Eat And Avoid 5 What to Eat When Constipated? 10 Foods to Improve Your Gut Health

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising
                Advertising

                Published on May 28, 2021

                10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively

                10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively

                Perhaps one of the hardest things a 4-year-old kid can learn is to tie his shoes. On the contrary, for adults like us, it’s the simplest and probably the most boring activity we can think of. I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t want to register for a seminar on how to lace shoes, right!

                It’s obvious, you don’t even need to use your brain when tying shoelaces. Look back up, I said most b-o-r-i-n-g a while ago when I mentioned lacing shoes up. But I will take that back. Why? Because when I saw the post from Diply featuring videos of lacing up shoes artistically, I realize how intricate, complicated, and creative it is to lace up shoes. That is if you do it like the way we do it on the featured videos.

                1. Lattice

                2. Hidden Knot

                3. Ladder

                4. Display

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYAOnCxO8To

                5. Loop Back

                6. Checkerboard

                7. Double Back

                8. Zipper

                9. Sawtooth

                10. Riding Bow

                Read Next