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5 Simple Ways to Stop Procrastinating for Good

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5 Simple Ways to Stop Procrastinating for Good

Procrastination is a dream killer. The goals, desires, and dreams we have can become reality once we overcome our procrastination. In this post, we’ll share 5 simple ways you can stop procrastinating for good.

1. Forgive yourself

As humans, we can’t expect ourselves to be perfect all the time. There will be times when we slip and fall, and instead of letting one moment bring us down, we should forgive ourselves and move on.

The language we use is often key here, and most of us are harder on ourselves than we think. While it’s important to have high expectations for ourselves, it can also be damaging.

Instead of saying “I’m so lazy…”, try saying “I’m just human, and even the most successful people have bad days.”

Instead of “I’m probably not going to succeed…”, try saying “I’m going to give it my best shot, and in the worst case scenario, I’ll still be fine.”

2. Prepare the night before

Studies have shown that humans have a finite amount of willpower, and procrastination usually comes from lack of motivation.

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Preparing for our day the night before allows us to take action from the moment we wake up, instead of being in reaction mode. This is because planning can take up a significant amount of energy that should be used to get important tasks done instead.

The method of preparing will vary from person to person, but my personal favorite is to schedule my day using a digital calendar, like Google Calendar.

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    For others, it could be creating a to-do list or simply working on the most important task for the day. Whatever your method, it’s important that you have some level of structure to your day planning.

    3. Say “No” more

    What we say “No” to in our life will determine the quality of the work we do. It’s impossible to take on every opportunity that comes at us, and it’s critical that we have a framework for prioritizing our everyday decisions.

    At Rype, we use a framework called the Eisenhower Matrix to make many of our decisions.

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    Here’s a plan of action for each quadrant:

    1. Urgent & Important: Do it immediately.
    2. Non-Urgent & Important: Decide when you’ll do it.
    3. Urgent & Non-Important: Delegate to someone else.
    4. Non-Urgent & Non-Important: Do it later.

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      4. Discover your “ONE Thing”

      Most activities that we do during our day, week, or month, have little impact on our end result.

      I’ve been personally guilty of this, trying to fill up my schedule with “busy” work instead of work that matters. The result was that I eventually burned out with very few results to show at the end of the day.

      Then I discovered the “ONE Thing,” which was introduced by the bestselling author Gary Keller. The “ONE Thing” is described as the one activity or task that will make everything else easier or unnecessary.

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        If you want to get in shape, you can go for a run every morning instead of trying out every different diet system that is advertised on TV.

        If you want to grow your business, you can increase your prices and focus your efforts on the 20% of clients bringing you 80% of sales instead of pleasing everyone.

        If you want to learn a new language, you can find a professional teacher who can work with you one-on-one instead of learning from books, Youtube videos, mobile apps, etc.

        5. Follow the 2-minute rule

        Most of us have probably experienced a cliffhanger moment on TV. It’s that moment where something unexpected or exciting happens, and before you get to the conclusion, the episode ends.

        It turns out that Hollywood has been leveraging what’s called the Zeigarnik Effect, which was named after the psychologist Bluma Zeigarnik.

        The Zeigarnik Effect states that once we start something without finishing it, we have a natural tendency to finish what we started. Studies also show that our perception of the task changes after we start, and we often end up enjoying the task.

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        This is why the 2-minute rule is powerful. By simply starting a task, even for 2-minutes, it’s likely that we’ll continue what we started or end up finishing it at a later time.

        If you want to read more books, read the first few pages and you’ll likely end up reading for hours.

        If you want to get healthier, just get to the gym and you’ll probably work out for an hour.

        If you want to learn Spanish, find a professional teacher online and you’ll be motivated to learn every week.

        Over to you

        What’s the one thing you’re procrastinating on? Which of these strategies will you use to take action?

        More by this author

        Sean Kim

        Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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        Last Updated on November 25, 2021

        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

        There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

        Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

          What Does Private Browsing Do?

          When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

          For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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          The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

          The Terminal Archive

          While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

          Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

          dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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          Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

          Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

          However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

          Clearing Your Tracks

          Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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          dscacheutil -flushcache

          As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

          Other Browsers and Private Browsing

          Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

          If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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          As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

          Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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