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7 Best Websites To Upgrade Your Skills If You’re Busy

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7 Best Websites To Upgrade Your Skills If You’re Busy

We get it. You want to continue to learn and develop your skills, but you just can’t seem to find the time to fit it into your busy schedule.

No matter what stage you are at in your career, upgrading your skills is one of the most important things you can do to get ahead in life. Whether this means adding a foreign language or a software skill to your resume, we’ve got you covered.

In this post, we’ll share with you the 7 best websites to upgrade your skills if you’re busy. You can get started today!

1. Khan Academy

Skills: Mathematics, Science, High school topics

If you’re in high school, university, or simply just want to brush up on the topics you learned in the past, Khan Academy is one of the best resources to check out. Most of the courses are taught by Salman Khan, who was recognized by Bill Gates as one of his favorite teachers online. This is why hundreds of thousands — if not millions — of students around the world can thank Khan Academy for getting them through high school and college.

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    2. Audible

    Skills: General audiobooks

    Acquired by Amazon, Audible operates the largest audiobook library in the world. With over 180,000 audio titles available today, you can find just about any book of your choosing.

    Whether you’re driving to work, doing the laundry, or riding the metro, Audible will read your book for you without any hassle. If you’re especially keen on going through more books faster, then you can increase the speed of the books being read to you by 1.5x or even 2x.

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      3. Rype

      Skills: Foreign language (Spanish)

      Rype is your 24/7 personal language coach, offering unlimited private language lessons with native-speaking professionals 24/7. If you’ve ever thought that you were too busy to learn a new language, you can rid of that limiting belief today!

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      The best part is that you can get started for free and try it out for yourself before you decide if it’s right for you.

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        4. Go High Brow

        Skills: General

        Do you have 5 minutes a day to learn something new?

        Go High Brow offers daily, 5-minute courses for you to learn any skill, like business, marketing, history, technology, etc. All you have to do is sign up and they will send you an email daily with a new episode.

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          5. OneMonth

          Skills: Programming, design, marketing

          Similar to Go High Brow, OneMonth offers courses on programming, business, and marketing, except instead of 5 minutes a day, OneMonth helps you learn the skill in one month. A slightly different approach, but a great tool for busy individuals nonetheless!

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            6. Duolingo

            Skills: Foreign languages

            Duolingo brings a unique, gamified approach to learning a language. By allowing you to upgrade to new levels and rewarding you with points, it’s a fun way to develop your foreign language skills. It’s worth noting that Duolingo has its limitations, since it can’t help you with your speaking skills. Nevertheless, it’s a great way to dip your feet into the pool if you’re just getting started with learning a new language.

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              7. theSkimm

              Skills: Current events, news

              Praised by Oprah herself, theSkimm helps you learn about what’s happening around the world (according to your interests) by sending you news summary right to your inbox. If you don’t have time to scour the web or wait through commercials on TV, then theSkimm is a great resource to sign up for.

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                What’s your favorite resource?

                Was there a particular tool or resource that stood out for you? Which one will you try out today to upgrade your skills in less time? Let us know in the comments!

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                Sean Kim

                Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                  What Does Private Browsing Do?

                  When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                  For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                  The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                  The Terminal Archive

                  While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                  Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                  dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                  Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                  Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                  However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                  Clearing Your Tracks

                  Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                  dscacheutil -flushcache

                  As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                  Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                  Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                  If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                  As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                  Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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