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3 Mindset Changes to Master Before Starting Your Business

3 Mindset Changes to Master Before Starting Your Business
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When you are thinking about starting your business it can be like a battle inside your head.

You’ll have many positive feelings also mixed with many negative ones.

Are you excited, motivated but also nervous and uncertain? This mindset is normal especially when you’ve worked at your 9-5 for many years. You’ve been told what time to arrive, what to do and when to leave.

But following someone else’s orders causes you to lose your own sense of self-direction.

Tuning into the right mindset doesn’t mean that you’ll never feel uncertain or nervous. But you’ll be able to control these emotions that are keeping you caged from reaching your potential. You’ll still experience negative thoughts and emotions but the successful mindset automatically transforms into positivity.

With such confidence, you’ll be progressing and will rarely be stuck in procrastination.

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So, let’s look at the 3 mindset changes you need to master before starting your business

The Secret Handler

Your subconscious plays a big role in the thoughts you think and the outcomes as a result of these thoughts. At the moment, if you are not conscious of what your subconscious tells you, then it’s likely to be having a negative impact on your success.

Your subconscious takes in and processes everything around you. It then replays this information back to you like a message of confirmation. Whatever is in your subconscious hard drive can expand or decrease your chances of success when starting your business.

The first step to reprogramming is through meditation. Harvard Gazette explains that meditation changes the structure of the brain. 8 weeks of mindfulness meditation increases the areas of the brain that helps to control emotion regulation and self-referential processing. There is also evidence of decreases in this part of the brain too. Cell volume in the Amygdala, which is responsible for fear, anxiety and stress, showed a lower level for people who meditate regularly.

Alongside meditation, simple quiet time is another great tool. You’ll be finding out the reasons behind why you’re holding yourself back.

Sit in a quiet place where you won’t be disturbed. Get a pen and paper and sit as though you are getting ready to meditate. Write down all of your worries and anxieties. Listen and feel what your subconscious is trying to say.

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What are its fears? Why isn’t it helping you work towards your goals? Is it trying to protect you from something? List the broad reasons and then you can start to dig deeper for specific answers. For example, your subconscious fears success which is a broad reason.

Listen to the specific answers about what it fears about success?

Is it scared of letting people down? Is it scared you might grow apart from your partner? Is it scared that business will take over your life?

Your subconscious is trying to prevent you from harm and disappointment so let it have its say. Use the opportunity to find genuine answers without judgement or anger. By tapping into their reasons why this is the priceless information you need to turn things around and reprogram your mindset.

The Luxury of Negative Thought

Business is tough and sometimes life can turn up the pressure. It can feel easier to stay in pajamas, eat cake and feel sorry for yourself. But this attitude never created anything positive.

Once you start becoming aware of your thoughts and committing to a positive attitude your perception of the world changes and so does your mindset.

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Commit 1 day to being a bystander on your own thoughts. Have you ever seen Supernanny? She spends one day monitoring the family and the next day she tells them where they are going wrong. This is what you will be doing with your own thoughts. Spend a day thinking your usual thoughts without interference. But every time you think a negative thought make a mental note of this.

By the end of the day think about how many negative thoughts you have accumulated? Can you even remember?

If you can’t, then it’s time to change. Instead of unconsciously committing to negative thoughts, why not conscious commit to positive ones?

Think about what makes you happy. Think about who you love. Think about it so much until you can’t help but smile. When you are filled with this positive, warm feeling you can begin to write down the things that you are grateful for. Make this process a personal one. It doesn’t have to be obvious. For example “I’m grateful that my family loves me”.

Make this about you, write down things like…

  • “I’m grateful my dad phones to check I’m home from work safely”
  • “I’m so lucky to have an accountability partner who cares enough to support me when I wanted to quit”

Write down 3-5 items. The next time you have a negative thought, take a minute to gather your thoughts and think of 1 item on your list. Take a deep breath in and breathe out slowly. When you do this imagine that you’re expelling the negativity, only being left with the gratitude of your positive thought.

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Success Steps Look Like This

New start-up owners make goals, want to hit targets and grow their business. But when it doesn’t happen within the time frame it can bring on impatience. The feeling of impatience creates negativity, anxiety and frustration which is the mindset that you don’t want.

A mindset that is constantly in a state of ‘chase’ will always be just out of reach from its intended goal.

You have to relax and know that no amount of shortcuts results in success. The reason it never works is because there is no shortcuts, no secrets and no get-it-faster technique.

Be in a state of focusing on growth and laying down strong foundations so your mindset is in the place of careful processes.

Conclusion

When it comes to starting your business a big mistake is to believe that years of a stagnate 9-5 will have no effect on building a mindset geared for success. You can break this mound and it’s not out of your reach. The mindset you seek is one that you already have; you only have to activate it. The seed is already planted and you just have to grow it.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on mindsets. Leave me a comment

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Featured photo credit: https://unsplash.com/ via unsplash.com

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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