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3 Signs It’s Time To Dump Your Job For A Better One

3 Signs It’s Time To Dump Your Job For A Better One

It’s a familiar story: job seeker finds job, falls madly in love, and thinks they’ll be happy together forever. But then, slowly, things start to change. They aren’t as passionate about the job as when they first met. It might happen after a few years or after just one month, but eventually the honeymoon period ends and it becomes obvious this may not be the right employment relationship after all.

It happens to the best of us: A job doesn’t turn out like we’d hoped or a position fails to keep up with our personal development, yet we don’t leave. Maybe it’s insecurity, fear, or just finding comfort in the monotony that’s holding us back. Or maybe we’re just worried that there’s nothing better out there.

There is.

But you’ve got to be willing to put yourself out there. Here are three signs it’s time to break up with your job and go after the career you really want.

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1. Time is not your friend.

Depending on how badly your mother wants grandkids, you’ve probably already begun to feel some pressure about your biological clock. But have you ever thought about your professional career clock?

Now let me be clear: it’s never too late to make a career change. It takes some people decades of trying out different jobs before they find the right one for them. However, staying in an unfulfilling job is a waste of time. Period.

If your daily duties and responsibilities bore you today, they won’t suddenly be your life’s passion next year. Instead of going into work every morning waiting for things to get better, your time would be better spent exploring new opportunities.

That’s not to say you need to jump into a new job right away. You could spend your time taking a class or freelancing in order to further develop your skills. There are countless options that will help your long-term career more than sticking with a dead-end job.

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2. You’re stuck in your comfort zone.

As underwhelming as it can be, being stuck in a professional rut does provide a sense of comfort. Sure, there may be nothing challenging or exciting about your job, but there’s also little chance of failure. And as long as that safety net is there, you’ll never step out of your comfort zone and find what you really were meant to do.

It’s scary to suddenly give up a steady paycheck in order to find something better, something you’re not even positive is out there. But fear can be a great motivator. Without the crutch you’re used to, you’ll have to get creative about deciding what to do next. And you might be surprised where your instincts take you.

Not to mention, once the initial shock wears off after you quit your job, you’ll feel an incredible sense of liberty. That will let you examine your career choices with fresh eyes so you can figure out what went wrong and what type of path will lead you to the success you want.

3. You’ve got a wandering eye.

One of the biggest signs that a relationship is over is when one of the parties starts to check out what other options are out there. If you perk up when you hear about your friends’ jobs or catch yourself daydreaming about an entirely different industry, it’s time to admit the truth: you and your job just aren’t meant to be.

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Once you face that fact, you’ll be free to truly examine all the options that are available to you. You can peruse job boards or go out on informational interviews without feeling guilty.

Your perfect career path is out there. You just have to know what resources are also out there and how you can best use them.

Don’t be afraid to take the time to get to know yourself a little better. Take an online personality quiz or try out the free career assessment available on my app, PathSource. After all, you’ll never know what job will bring you long-term happiness unless you know what it is that you really want.

Breakups are never easy. Especially when you’ve invested as much time and energy as many of us do in our careers. But, hey, you and your job aren’t married and there are plenty of other careers out there. You’ve just got to be brave enough to go out and find them.

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What are some other signs that it’s time to quit your job? Share in the comments below!

Featured photo credit: keshavnaidu via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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