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Collaborate like the Jedi Council

Collaborate like the Jedi Council

Collaboration is hard work. Clearly communicating what you want to accomplish requires time, energy, and planning; unless, of course, you’re a Jedi. For a Jedi, a simple wave of the hand and the weak of mind do exactly as you request.

For everyone else, millions of dollars of productivity are lost each year because of failures of communication. Whether it’s employees being terminated because a manager doesn’t believe that they are performing well enough or employees running for the door because they don’t believe in their manager. The cost is astounding and a massive percentage of it could be avoided through better communication and collaboration.

Is being a Jedi really the easiest management job in the world? Did Obi-Wan simply envision the outcome and the path to achieve it and Anakin just knew what he intended? Learning to collaborate like Masters of the Jedi Council such as Yoda and Mace Windu takes time; here are some keys to collaboration we can learn from the Jedi:

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1. It takes time

“Patience you must have my young Padawan.” – Master Yoda

You can’t expect a Padawan to be a Jedi Master in a month. The Jedi Order has long required a lengthy apprenticeship, typically over a decade. Imagine how aligned your thinking would be if you and your mentor, apprentice, or boss spent 10 weeks doing every job together, let alone ten years!

Early on in the Padawan and Master relationship the Master Jedi leads and the Padawan follows, no questions asked. The expectation is clear that this is how things will remain for some time. This level of delegation requires strong leadership from the Master and extremely clear direction and relentless follow up. During the early days of these relationships they are less collaborative, however it builds the basis of trust and is a foundational transfer of knowledge.

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Be patient with your team members, especially when they’re new. Ask yourself the following questions: “Have I clearly set expectations?”, “Does Anakin (or insert Padawan or associate’s name) know how I like to communicate?”, and “Have I clearly conveyed the goal and why it’s important?”.

2. Focus on the “Why” before the “How”

“It’s against my programming to impersonate a deity.” – C-3PO

In Empire Strikes Back, while Luke Skywalker is trapped in the ice plains of Hoth he is visited by the ghost of his early mentor Obi-Wan Kenobi and told to travel to Dagobah to train under his old master Yoda. When Luke arrives on Dagobah, Yoda’s focus is on helping young Skywalker understand the importance of controlling the Force and not on how use a light saber. Yoda is constantly seeking to get Luke to understand the “why” rather than the “how” of controlling the Force.

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Before embarking on your next project, take the time to align everyone’s understanding of what you are working towards. Strive to show how each part is essential to the overall success and why this project is important to the company and each of the team member’s individually. Once C-3PO understood the “why” behind impersonating a god in front of the Ewoks in Return of the Jedi, he easily executed the technical skills necessary to achieve the “how”.

3. Write it down

“If an item does not appear in our records, it does not exist.” – Jocasta Nu

Despite the strength of the Force even the Jedi have a centralized repository of information. Located on Coruscant in the Jedi Temple are the Jedi Archives, a place where any Jedi can seek out the laws and knowledge of the Order, and the universe.

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Just as the Jedi need a central place to store information so does your team. Collaboration requires it. Whether your team works from a shared Google Doc, a white board, or a project management software (be it Kanbanchi, Asana, Basecamp or anything other – you name it) the likelihood of a team collaborating effectively if they are in the dark is low. A centralized information site allows parties to see progress (a key element of motivation) who is responsible for what task, and therefore where to direct questions, in addition to what to expect down the road.

Even with the power of the Force to aid them, the Jedi have to work to collaborate effectively. By being patient, taking the time to clearly communicate your needs, explaining why the team is doing what they’re doing, and then creating a forum to share information, and track progress you will be well on your way to collaborating like the Jedi Council. May the Force be with you.

Featured photo credit: The Jedi Council near the end of the Clone Wars via starwars.wikia.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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