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Fun Facts About Toilet Paper That Will Blow Your Mind

Fun Facts About Toilet Paper That Will Blow Your Mind

Toilet paper isn’t a common topic of conversation because it’s usually saved for intimate occasions. After all, how many of us have ever really wondered about toilet paper? I mean, beyond if there’s any left or not? However, there are a lot of interesting toilet paper statistics and fun facts that might impress you.

Toilet Paper is a Pretty New Invention

    Image via Flickr by Dean Hochman

    The first recorded use of toilet paper may have been in China in the 6th century, but the Chinese government didn’t start mass producing it until the 14th century. You couldn’t go out and buy packaged toilet paper in the United States until 1857. Also, it wasn’t until 1935 that a manufacturer promised a splinter-free toilet paper. In 1973, Johnny Carson joked that there was a toilet paper shortage. Everyone believed the joke and ran out to the store to stock up. It then took up to three weeks for some stores to resupply their toilet paper stock.

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    You Can Use Toilet Paper in More Than Just the Bathroom

    During Desert Storm, the U.S. Army camouflaged their tanks with coloured toilet paper. Also, Charmin sponsored a contest to design and make wedding dresses out of toilet paper. That’s no joke. The winner actually received $2,000. The Japanese horror novelist famous for writing “The Ring” printed an entire novel on a single roll of toilet paper. The novel takes place in a public bathroom and the story is about three feet long.

    Many People Don’t Use Toilet Paper

    About four billion people, or 70-75% of the world’s population, do not use toilet paper. Some people don’t use toilet paper because of a lack of trees in the region. Others don’t use toilet paper because they can’t afford it or there’s insufficient plumbing. In many European countries, bidets are preferable to toilet paper because of culture, customs, and effectiveness (after all, water is the universal solvent, not paper).

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    They do use regular toilet paper on the International Space Station, but they have to seal and compress it in special containers. When researchers asked people what necessity they would bring to a deserted island, 49% said they would bring toilet paper before they would bring food.

    We Use More Toilet Paper Than You’d Think

    The world population uses nearly 30,000 trees every day in toilet paper. That means we use 10 million trees each year in toilet paper. Americans use an average of 8.6 sheets of toilet paper each trip to the bathroom. Visitors will use a single roll of toilet paper in a public restroom on average 71 times. 61% of people use toilet paper for nose care, 17% use toilet paper to wipe up small spills, and 8% use toilet paper to remove makeup. The Pentagon uses an average of 666 rolls of toilet paper each day.

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    Even though it’s probably never a topic of conversation you thought you’d have (I mean, who would really?), there are a lot of fun facts about toilet paper in the world. For example, Did you know that the average amount of time a toilet paper roll lasts in the most used bathroom of a house is 5 days? Also, There is a “right” and “wrong” way to hang a roll of toilet paper. 72% of people hang the toilet paper roll with the end of the paper roll going over the top, which is considered the “right” way. The other 18%, well, they just need to get with the program.

    Conclusion

    Whether you want to know what kind of toilet paper Beyoncé uses, what your toilet paper placement says about your intelligence, or what the best toilet paper is, there’s an answer to your question. If you know your toilet paper fun facts, you’ll always be a hit at a party!

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    Featured photo credit: Dean Hochman via c1.staticflickr.com

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    Last Updated on December 2, 2018

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

    The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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    The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

    Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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    Review Your Past Flow

    Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

    Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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    Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

    Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

    Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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    Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

    Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

    We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

    Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

      Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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